Internal Opportunities and Announcements

Dear Colleague Letter on the Ebola Virus (NSF 15-006)
National Science Foundation

post haste: applies to education, social and behavioral sciences, and other disciplines depending on approach.

UPDATE: MSU researchers are actively responding to this call. If you believe your expertise is useful to the following objectives described in this letter, please consider submitting a RAPID proposal. For assistance with a RAPID proposal, please contact the Office of Sponsored programs at 994-2381 and/or the program officer listed in the solicitation.

....................................................

October 16, 2014

Dear Colleague,

In light of the recent emergence of the lethal Ebola virus in the US, the National Science Foundation (NSF) is accepting proposals to conduct non-medical, non-clinical care research that can be used immediately to better understand how to model and understand the spread of Ebola, educate about prophylactic behaviors, and encourage the development of products, processes, and learning that can address this global challenge.

I invite researchers to use the Rapid Response Research (RAPID) funding mechanism, which allows NSF to receive and review proposals having a severe urgency with regard to availability of, or access to data, facilities or specialized equipment, as well as quick-response research on natural or anthropogenic disasters and similar unanticipated events.

Complete guidance on submitting a RAPID proposal may be found here:
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/policydocs/pappguide/nsf14001/gpg_2.jsp#IID1.

Sincerely,

Dr. France A. Córdova
Director

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Information Regarding Automated Compliance Checking of NSF Proposals: Applications Could Be Returned Without Review
National Science Foundation

Effective July 25, 2016

NSF continues to focus on the automated compliance checks of proposals in order to decrease the burden on both the research community and NSF staff.  Effective July 25, 2016, all proposals will be subject to a new series of automated compliance validation checks to ensure proposals comply with requirements outlined in Chapter II.C.2. of the Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide (PAPPG).

The new set of automated compliance checks will trigger error messages for each of the following rules and may result in the return of a proposal without review:

  • Biographical Sketch(es) and Current and Pending Support files are required  for each Senior Personnel associated with a proposal; and

  • Biographical Sketch(es) can only be uploaded as a file, must not exceed two pages and can no longer be entered as text.

Note About Proposal File Update (PFU):  Proposers should be aware should that if a proposal was received prior to July 25 and contained only one Biographical Sketch and/or Current & Pending Support file (rather than individual files for each senior personnel), a PFU addressing any section of the proposal will result in the proposal not being accepted if it does not comply with these new compliance checks.  The checks will be run on all sections of the proposal regardless of which section was updated during the PFU.

Note about Grants.gov:  Proposers should also be aware that Grants.gov will allow a proposal to be submitted, even if it does not comply with these proposal preparation requirements.  Should NSF receive a proposal from Grants.gov that is not compliant, it will be returned without review.

Please note that the new set of compliance checks are in addition to the compliance checks that currently exist in FastLane.  You can view a complete list of FastLane auto-compliance checks, including these checks, by clicking here.  The list specifies which checks are run depending on funding opportunity type (GPG, Program Description, Program Announcement or Program Solicitation) and type of proposal (Research, RAPID, EAGER, Ideas Lab, Conference, Equipment, International Travel, Facility/Center or Fellowship).  It also specifies whether the check triggers a "warning" or "error" message for non-compliant proposals.

We encourage you to share this information with your colleagues. For system-related questions, please contact the NSF Help Desk at 1-800-381-1532 or Rgov@nsf.gov.  Policy-related questions should be directed to policy@nsf.gov.

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Open Access Author Fund at MSU - Pilot Project
MSU Library

The Open Access Author Fund

The MSU Library will run an author's fund on a two year pilot to judge if we can help remove the barrier between MSU authors and open access publishing. The Library will contribute $50,000 to the fund to be dispersed to authors who are being charged an APC. Authors will receive no more than $2,000 per fiscal year on a rolling basis.

Goals

  • To allow MSU created research to reach the greatest number of potential readers.
  • To remove some of the burden on authors as they work to make an impact in their field of expertise.


The Application Process

Eligible Publications and Data repositories

The publication venue must be an established journal or data repository, either, one that does not charge readers or their institutions for access to peer-reviewed articles or datasets, or an established hybrid journal.

Journals or Data repositories should fit at least one of the following criteria:

  • Be listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (unless the journal is too new for DOAJ eligibility) or similar list of data repositories, OR
  • Be a member of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association or adhere to its Code of Conduct, OR
  • Be a publicly available data repository, OR
  • Have a publicly available standard fee schedule.

Eligible Articles and Data

Articles/data should:

  • Be a peer-reviewed article submitted to an open access/hybrid journal or the associated data.
  • Have Publication Status of 'accepted-for-publication', funds are not available for articles still in process.
  • Not have been published prior to the authors' request for funds. Already-published articles are ineligible.
  • The library will not reimburse any author fees that have already been paid by an author.

Articles will be considered only if there is no other source of funding available. The fund is a limited resource intended to support open access publishing across the University. We expect researchers to request funding for open access publication from their funding agency if they can do so. For example, the National Institutes of Health will fund open access publications as part of their research grants. If such funds are not available, we welcome your application.

Eligible Authors

Funds are available for faculty, staff, professional and research positions, and students at MSU - Bozeman.

Eligible Fees

Article processing fees may include publication fees (charges levied on articles accepted for publication, including Open Access page charges). Eligible fees must be based on a publication's standard fee schedule that is independent of the author's institution. Reprint fees are not eligible. Reimbursement will cover only direct costs for open access publication (not the cost of reprints, color illustration fees, non-open access page charges, etc.). Requests for funding will be reviewed by the Library's Scholarly Communication Steering Group and a decision for funding support will be communicated to the author.

Fund Limits

The fund for FY15 is $50,000. Each author is limited to $2,000 per FY. Unused fund amounts do not roll over to future years. If the demand for funds exceeds expectations, publication charges will be paid to the publisher on behalf of an author on a first-come, first-served basis.

Institutional Repository

As an added service, the library will deposit a copy of funded articles in the institutional repository, and willingness to deposit here is a requirement of receiving funding. The placement of an article in the repository helps to build the collection of publications, supports the self-archiving arm of the open access movement, and provides institutional preservation and discoverability.

How do I apply?

Complete the online form.

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Early Stage Investigator Career Awards
American Indian/Alaska Native Clinical and Translational Research Program (AI/AN CTRP)

Application due: Feb. 28, 2019

The American Indian/Alaska Native Clinical and Translational Program requests applications for selection as an AI/AN CTRP Mentored Research Scholar. The program will support early stage investigators with protected time and funding to develop NIH competitive projects. The goal of the program is to support promising early stage investigators as they establish independent research careers.

Applicants must hold a doctoral degree (e.g., PhD, MD, DO) and be current faculty members or faculty candidates with a clear intent to pursue academic careers in areas of health disparities research. Faculty candidates must provide a letter from the institutional hiring authority confirming forthcoming faculty status. Investigators from all CTRP partner and non-partner institutions are eligible.

Engagement with AI/AN communities is prerequisite. Research must be of benefit to AI/AN people and applicants must indicate whether the research area is a tribally-identified priority. Applications also must include letters from named community partners, plans to disseminate study findings to the community, community collaboration in project development, mechanisms for active engagement, and oversight by community members.

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Summer Internship Program in Biomedical Research (SIP)
National Institutes of Health

Application due: Mar. 1, 2019

Summer programs at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) provide an opportunity to spend a summer working at the NIH side-by-side with some of the leading scientists in the world, in an environment devoted exclusively to biomedical research.

At the NIH, biomedical sciences include everything from behavioral and social sciences, through biology and chemistry, to physics, mathematical modeling, computational biology, and biostatistics. The NIH consists of the 240-bed Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center and more than 1,150 laboratories/research groups located on the main campus in Bethesda, MD, and the surrounding area as well as in Baltimore and Frederick, MD; Research Triangle Park, NC; Hamilton, MT; Framingham, MA; Phoenix, AZ; and Detroit, MI. (NOTE: the number of positions in Hamilton, Framingham, Phoenix, and Detroit is limited.)

Internships cover a minimum of eight weeks, with students generally arriving at the NIH in May or June. The NIH Institutes/Centers and the Office of Intramural Training & Education (OITE) sponsor a wide range of summer activities including an orientation to help interns get off to a good start, lectures featuring distinguished NIH investigators, career/professional development workshops, and Summer Poster Day.

The 2019 Summer Internship Program is for students who:

  • are 18 years of age or older on June 15, 2019,
  • are U.S. citizens or permanent residents, AND
  • are in college (including community college) or graduate/professional school at the time of application, OR
  • are high school graduates at the time of application and have been accepted into accredited college or university programs.

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NIH Undergraduate Scholarship Program
National Institutes of Health

Application due: Mar. 18, 2019

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Undergraduate Scholarship Program (UGSP) offers competitive scholarships to students from disadvantaged backgrounds who are committed to careers in biomedical, behavioral, and social science health-related research.

The program offers:

  • Scholarship support

  • Paid research training at the NIH during the summer

  • Paid employment and training at the NIH after graduation

The NIH UGSP will pay up to $20,000 per academic year in tuition, educational expenses, and reasonable living expenses to scholarship recipients. Scholarships are awarded for one year and can be renewed for up to four years.

For each full or partial scholarship year, scholarship recipients are committed to two NIH service obligations. The obligations are actually benefits from the UGSP, providing recipients with invaluable research training and experience at the NIH:

  1. Ten-week Summer Laboratory Experience. After each year of scholarship support, recipients will train for 10 weeks as a paid summer research employee in an NIH research laboratory. This employment occurs after the receipt of the scholarship award. Each scholar will work directly with an NIH Principal Investigator or an NIH postdoctoral fellow, who will serve as mentors.

  2. Employment at the NIH after Graduation. After graduation, recipients will continue their training as a full-time employee in an NIH research laboratory. Recipients must serve one year of full-time employment for each year of scholarship.

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Pilot Projects
Center for American Indian and Rural Health Equity (CAIRHE)

Full Application due: Apr. 1, 2019

The Center for American Indian and Rural Health Equity (CAIRHE) requests proposals for Pilot Projects that address the mission of the Center to reduce health disparities in Native and rural communities in Montana. Use of a community-based participatory research (CBPR) framework is highly encouraged but not required, though all projects must have a health equity focus consistent with the CAIRHE mission.

Faculty applicants may develop projects within a single discipline (e.g., social sciences), but CAIRHE also encourages collaborative projects between biomedical and social and behavioral health investigators. As in all CAIRHE-funded research, projects should have a high likelihood of leading to independent funding from external (non-MSU) sponsors, such as the National Institutes of Health, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the National Science Foundation.

For pilot projects, CAIRHE will award funding for one grant year (September 1, 2019, through August 31, 2020). First-year pilot projects have the possibility of competitive renewal for a second and final year. The award of CAIRHE pilot projects for 2019-20 is contingent upon continuing NIH grant funding to the Center.

After reading the full RFP, if you still have questions about CAIRHE or whether this opportunity is the right fit for you, please contact James Burroughs, CAIRHE program coordinator (jburroughs@montana.edu; 994-4407), to arrange a meeting. We are happy to come to you and answer your questions. In fact, we strongly recommend meeting with us before you consider applying.

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AI/AN CTRP Year 4 Request for Pilot, Development, and Diversity Proposals
American Indian/Alaska Native Clinical and Translational Research Program (AI/AN CTRP)

Pre-Proposal due: Feb. 20, 2019
New or Revised Proposal due: Mar. 20, 2019
Competitive Renewal Proposal due: Apr. 10, 2019

The America Indian/Alaska Native Clinical Translational Research Program is soliciting proposals from investigators to support and develop research programs relevant to AI/AN health disparities in Montana and Alaska.

The AI/AN CTRP has the goal of developing the capacity of several Montana and Alaska institutions to address health disparities that Native communities in these states face. The AI/AN CTRP seeks to: 1) Strengthen Montana and Alaska clinical and translational research infrastructure through continued development of shared facilities, intellectual resources, research collaborations, focused working groups, and training opportunities; 2) Increase the numbers of mentors while developing the careers of clinical investigators in Native health disparities research in Montana and Alaska; and 3) Expand and support sustainable and culturally responsible community-engaged research that will mitigate health disparities in Montana and Alaska Native communities.

Special Emphasis: Priority will be given to proposals that address substance abuse, including, but not limited to, methamphetamine and opioid addiction. However, proposals addressing all health issues in AI/AN communities will be considered.

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Social and Behavioral Science Grant Review Learning Community
Department of Health & Human Development, Women in STEM, and the Office of Sponsored Programs

Tues., Sept. 18, 2018, 12:00-1:00 p.m., 221 Herrick Hall Conference Room

Are you working on a grant in the social and behavioral sciences (SBS)? Join us for a new monthly grant review session starting September 18 and continuing every third Tuesday throughout the year. Each month two people will bring up to three pages of the grant they are working on for the group to read and give feedback. It is a chance for you to read grants in the SBS area and get feedback from colleagues and experts.

Register in advance using the program link below or come to the first session to learn more. Please bring your lunch.

Hosted by Suzanne Held, Professor of Health & Human Development and Women in STEM/SBS Distinguished Professor

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Summer Program for Undergraduate Research (SPUR)
University of Oregon

Application due: Accepted for Summer 2019 program until all slots are filled

Program Dates: June 16 - August 23, 2019

The University of Oregon (UO) Summer Program for Undergraduate Research (SPUR) provides fellowship opportunities for undergraduate students from other Universities and Colleges to participate in ongoing research in Life Sciences laboratories at UO during the Summer months. Each project is a rigorous and rich immersion in a mentored, high-profile science research project with a lab mentor under the direction of a research professor.

We are very interested in enhancing the creativity, diversity, and talent of the next generation of life scientists in research communities. We stress active, experiential learning, because a true understanding of scientific ideas requires immersion into the processes of discovery, and it is reflected in the ability to communicate these ideas. SPUR training stresses active learning for interns and their mentors in experimental approaches, methodological skills, strategic design, creative and critical reasoning, and scientific communication. Professional and social interactions with active researchers at all levels helps interns boost personal confidence. In selecting summer interns, we seek talented, motivated, adventurous, and hard-working undergraduates who would benefit from what our program has to offer, and who perhaps would not otherwise have such opportunities.

The Summer Program for Undergraduate Research aims to train students to become creative explorers, to expand their interest and excitement in science, and to increase opportunities for them to pursue careers in research. We are very interested in enhancing the diversity and talent of the next generation of life scientists in the research community. We stress active, experiential learning, because a true understanding of scientific ideas requires immersion into the processes of discovery, and it is reflected in the ability to communicate these ideas.

SPUR offers closely mentored research projects to provide broad, experience-based training in science research. This training, which stresses active learning for both interns and mentors, includes experimental approaches, methodological skills, strategic design, creative and critical reasoning, and scientific communication. We aim to boost personal confidence by professional and social interactions with active researchers at all levels. In selecting summer interns, we seek talented, motivated, adventurous, and hard-working undergraduates who would benefit from what our program has to offer, and who perhaps would not otherwise have such opportunities.

SPUR contributes to national efforts to raise competence in STEM areas, enhances access to research careers for students with limited access to research facilities and experience, broadens the participation of minority researchers in STEM field related careers, and trains graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to be effective mentors.

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Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)
National Science Foundation

Application due: Varies by program (May 24, 2019 or Aug. 28, 2019)

The Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program supports active research participation by undergraduate students in any of the areas of research funded by the National Science Foundation. REU projects involve students in meaningful ways in ongoing research programs or in research projects specifically designed for the REU program.

This solicitation features two mechanisms for support of student research: (1) REU Sites are based on independent proposals to initiate and conduct projects that engage a number of students in research. REU Sites may be based in a single discipline or academic department or may offer interdisciplinary or multi-department research opportunities with a coherent intellectual theme. Proposals with an international dimension are welcome. (2) REU Supplements may be included as a component of proposals for new or renewal NSF grants or cooperative agreements or may be requested for ongoing NSF-funded research projects.

Undergraduate student participants in either REU Sites or REU Supplements must be U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, or permanent residents of the United States. Students do not apply to NSF to participate in REU activities. Students apply directly to REU Sites or to NSF-funded investigators who receive REU Supplements. To identify appropriate REU Sites, students should consult the directory of active REU Sites on the Web at https://www.nsf.gov/crssprgm/reu/reu_search.cfm.

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Fellowships

NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowships (AAPF)
National Science Foundation

Application due: Oct. 24, 2018

NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowships provide an opportunity for highly qualified, recent doctoral scientists to carry out an integrated program of independent research and education. Fellows may engage in observational, instrumental, theoretical, laboratory or archival data research in any area of astronomy or astrophysics, in combination with a coherent educational plan for the duration of the fellowship.

The program supports researchers for a period of up to three years with fellowships that may be taken to eligible host institutions of their choice. The program is intended to recognize early-career investigators of significant potential and to provide them with experience in research and education that will establish them in positions of distinction and leadership in the scientific community.

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Student Internship Research Participant Program
National Renewable Energy Laboratory/DOE

Applications accepted as positions become available

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsor provides internships at its facilities for undergraduate and graduate students enrolled full-time in a U.S. college or university. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents. The applicant may be eligible for round-trip transportation.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Graduate and undergraduate students have the opportunity to participate in the laboratory\'s research and development programs, initiate new areas of research, and establish a base for ongoing collaborations through NREL\'s Research Participant Program. Students with new ideas and talents can contribute to research of mutual interest in NREL\'s research and deployment disciplines, while also contributing to the transfer of the technology resulting from that research.

Applications are accepted as positions become available.

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Switzer Research Fellowships Program
Department of Health and Human Services

Application due: Feb. 11, 2019

The purpose of the Switzer Research Fellowships Program is to build research capacity by providing support to highly qualified individuals, including those who are individuals with disabilities, to conduct research on the rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities. Fellows must conduct original research in an area authorized by Section 204 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

Section 204 authorizes research, demonstration projects, training and related activities, the purposes of which are to develop methods, procedures, and rehabilitation technology that maximize the full inclusion and integration into society, employment, independent living, family support, and economic and social self-sufficiency of individuals with disabilities, especially individuals with the most severe disabilities, and to improve the effectiveness of services authorized under the Act.

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Idaho National Laboratory Graduate Fellowship
Idaho National Laboratory / U.S. Department of Energy

Application due: Feb. 15, 2019

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is seeking candidates for the INL Graduate Fellowship Appointment. This appointment is awarded to Ph.D. students with interest in advancing the fields of nuclear energy and clean energy deployment. Ideal candidates have exceptional educational capabilities and the potential for significant achievements. This appointment may support candidates represented broadly in an area aligned with INL\'s core areas of interest listed below:

  • Advanced Computer Science, Visualization and Data

  • Biological and Bioprocess Engineering

  • Applied Materials Science and Engineering

  • Chemical and Molecular Science

  • Chemical Engineering

  • Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science

  • Decision Science and Analysis

  • Environmental Subsurface Science

  • Large-Scale User Facilities/Advanced Instrumentation

  • Mechanical Design and Engineering

  • Nuclear and Radio Chemistry

  • Nuclear Engineering

  • Power Systems and Electrical Engineering

  • Systems Engineering and Electrical Engineering

The INL Graduate Fellowship Program is designed to be a triad relationship between the student, their university thesis advisor, and an INL technical advisor. The selected students will receive mentoring support from both the university and INL while pursuing their Ph.D. The student will conduct their dissertation research at INL the last two years of their Ph.D. program.

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Jerry O'Neal Research Fellowship
Glacier National Park Conservancy

Application due: Feb. 15, 2019

Applications are now being accepted for Glacier National Park Conservancy - Jerry O'Neal Research Fellowship. Jerry O'Neal was a scientist, poet, and writer. He had a deep love of nature and was an outspoken proponent for the need to have sound science to support resource management decisions. Jerry began his nearly 30 years of public service as an entomologist with the U.S. Forest Service and was the regional toxicologist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Atlanta. He joined the National Park Service in 1998 as chief of science and resources management at Mammoth Cave National Park and later served as chief of the resource management program for 64 parks in the Southeast. He became deputy superintendent of Glacier National Park in 2002 where he was actively engaged in a range of environmental management projects and was a key park official during the wildfires of 2003.

Jerry grew up in a poor family from the south and was the first to attend college. Education cultivated his commitment to preserving the natural world. In keeping with his model of learning as a way of improving one's life situation and fostering environmental stewardship, the fellowship aims to provide educational assistance for students seeking to understand natural and cultural resource issues and how these intersect with human values. Special consideration will be given to proposals that address the following:

  • Natural resource issues such as aquatic ecology, terrestrial ecology, fire ecology, invasive plants, and climate change

  • Cultural resource issues, such as history and architectural studies, cultural landscape reports, ethnographic research and archeology

  • Social science that informs resource management about a natural or cultural topic and/or that addresses visitor impacts to park resources

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Native American Residency Fellowship (Visual Art)
Harpo Foundation

Application due: Feb. 15, 2019

The Chicago-based Harpo Foundation was established in 2006 to support artists who are underrecognized by the field. The foundation seeks to stimulate creative inquiry to encourage new modes of thinking about art.

The foundation is accepting applications for its Native American Fellowships at the Vermont Studio Center program, which supports the development of artists with the potential for intercultural dialogue. Each year, the program awards two residency fellowships to Native American artists at the Vermont Studio Center, a historic artist colony located along the Gihon River in Johnson, Vermont, a village in the heart of the northern Green Mountains. Each fellow receives a one-month residency, which includes room and board, a private studio, and a $500 travel stipend.

To be eligible, Native American artists must demonstrate strong artistic ability, an evolving practice that is at a pivotal moment in its development, and a practice that engenders dialogue between the artist\'s indigenous world and the surrounding culture.

For complete program guidelines, information about previous fellowship recipients, and applications instructions, see the Harpo Foundation website (use program link, below).

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Interdisciplinary Research Leaders
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Application due: Mar. 13, 2019

Interdisciplinary Research Leaders, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is a leadership development opportunity for teams of researchers and community partners--including organizers, advocates, or other community champions. These teams use the power of applied research--research that informs and supports critical work being done in communities--to advance health and equity. Their innovation helps build a Culture of Health, one that enables everyone in America to live longer, healthier lives.

Each year, applicant teams focus on one of two annual themes. The two themes for the 2019 Interdisciplinary Research Leaders CFA are: 1) Community development and health; and 2) Clinical practice, social services, and health.

IRL fellows receive $25,000 per year for each team member ($75,000 over three years) to support time in the program (approximately one day per week), and a one-time research project grant of approximately $100,000 for the team. There\'s no need to relocate--fellows gather several times per year in-person, then collaborate virtually and apply earnings in real time in their home communities. They become refreshed and recharged, ready to use their innovation and leadership to advance a Culture of Health.

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2019 Fellowships from the BYU Charles Redd Center for Western Studies
Brigham Young University

Application due: Mar. 15, 2019

The Charles Redd Center for Western Studies is pleased to announce Fellowship Awards in Western American History for 2019. These awards provide between $1,000 and $3,500 to students and scholars interested in pursuing research regarding the American West in the L. Tom Perry Special Collections of the Harold B. Lee Library at BYU.

Awards fund up to one month's research. Funds are to be used for research support including travel and lodging expenses, but not as salary. Awards are to be used for scholarly projects including preparation of seminar papers, theses, dissertations, monographs, and books.

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CRI Irvington Postdoctoral Fellowship Program
Cancer Research Institute

Application due: Apr. 1, 2019

The CRI Irvington Postdoctoral Fellowship Program supports qualified young scientists at leading universities and research centers around the world who wish to receive training in fundamental immunology or cancer immunology. A panel of scientists drawn from our Scientific Advisory Council rigorously evaluates each candidate, the intended sponsor and training environment, and the nature and feasibility of the proposed project.

The Institute seeks hypothesis-driven, mechanistic studies in both immunology and tumor immunology. The applicant and sponsor should make every effort to demonstrate the potential of the proposed studies to directly impact our understanding of the immune system\'s role in cancer.

Applicants for the CRI Irvington Postdoctoral Fellowship Program must be working in areas directly related to immunology or cancer immunology. An eligible project must fall into the broad field of immunology with relevance to solving the cancer problem. Applicants must have a doctoral degree by the date of award activation and must conduct their proposed research under a sponsor who holds a formal appointment at the host institution.

Newly awarded fellowships provide a stipend of $55,000 for the first year, $57,000 for the second year, and $59,000 for the third year. In addition, an allowance of $1,500 per year is allotted to the host institution for use at the sponsor\'s discretion to help pay for the fellow\'s research supplies, travel to scientific meetings, and/or health insurance.

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Graduate Research Fellowship in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
U.S. Department of Justice

Application due: Apr. 17, 2019

The Graduate Research Fellowship in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (GRF-STEM) program provides awards to accredited academic institutions to support graduate research leading to doctoral degrees in topic areas that are relevant to preventing and controlling crime and ensuring the fair and impartial administration of criminal justice in the United States. Applicant academic institutions sponsoring doctoral students are eligible to apply only if:

  1. The doctoral student's degree program is in a science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) discipline; and

  2. The student's proposed dissertation research has demonstrable implications for addressing the challenges of preventing or controlling crime and/or the fair and impartial administration of criminal justice in the United States.

Successful applicants must demonstrate clearly how the proposed dissertation research will advance criminal justice practice and/or policy in the United States. Proposals addressing one or more of the following six areas are particularly encouraged:

  • Reducing and preventing violent crime.

  • Combating the opioid epidemic.

  • Promoting law enforcement officer safety, health, and wellness.

  • Rescuing and restoring crime victims.

  • Securing our Nation's borders.

  • Enhancing law enforcement investigations and prosecutions.

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The Irene Diamond Fund / AFAR Postdoctoral Transition Awards in Aging
American Federation for Aging Research (AFAR)

Agency LOI due: Jan. 22, 2019
Full Application due (by invitation only): Mid-May 2019

The Irene Diamond Fund / AFAR Postdoctoral Transition Awards in Aging distinguishes itself from other postdoctoral fellowship programs by providing full-time research training and flexible and portable grant support to senior postdoctoral fellows--those with at least three and not more than six years of prior postdoctoral training--providing leverage to negotiate for junior faculty appointments and independent research programs either at their own or other institutions. The purpose of this program is to facilitate the development of junior faculty members who have training and expertise in translational aging research as described below.

Translational research, in the broadest sense, is defined here as a systematic effort to convert basic research knowledge into practical applications to improve human health and well-being. This program will prioritize Type 1 translational aging research, i.e. research focused on basic aging discoveries that have a clearly articulated pathway towards clinical relevance to the health and well-being of older adults. These may include proof of concept studies or small-scale studies related to new diagnostic, treatment, or preventive modalities related to aging-relevant biology. Type 2 translational research, such as projects that are strictly clinical in nature, are not eligible. Studies should use one or more of the following models:

  • Human subjects
  • Human cells and tissues
  • Mice or other mammals

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Limited Submissions

Montana Healthcare Foundation Grants
Montana Healthcare Foundation

ROUND 1: Internal MSU LOI due: Feb. 2, 2018
Full Agency Application due: Feb. 23, 2018
ROUND 2: Internal MSU LOI due: Feb. 23, 2018; Full Agency Application due: June 15, 2018

The Montana Healthcare Foundation (MHCF) makes grants to improve the health and well-being of all Montanans. For 2018, we are pleased to announce this competitive Call for Proposals (CFP).

We will consider proposals in three areas under this CFP:

  • American Indian Health

  • Behavioral Health

  • Partnerships for Better Health

Projects funded through this CFP will address key health and health care challenges and will address the upstream social, economic, and educational challenges that drive health disparities. We place a priority on proposals that have a high potential for becoming financially self-sustaining.

Project Examples

Please note that these are only examples, and we will gladly consider funding other types of projects if they meet our basic selection criteria.

  • Strategic and business planning: One-year planning grants that will result in a viable plan to fund and implement programming to address an important health issue.

  • Partnerships outside the health sector: Proposals that seek to build partnerships with organizations beyond the health sector (for example: schools, local businesses, community and economic developers, or departments of planning and transportation) to build strong, resilient communities and address issues, such as poor housing, limited opportunities for youth engagement, community support for seniors, unemployment, or access to healthful foods.

  • Upstream influences on health and well-being: Projects that address access to healthful food, housing, transportation, and other upstream influences on health and well-being.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a \"Limited Submission Pre-Proposal\" and select the sponsor, \"Montana Healthcare Foundation (MONHEA012) [P],\" and the program, \"Montana Healthcare Foundation Grants.\"
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is Friday, February 2, 2018.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by February 23, 2018.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist, at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

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Searle Scholars Program
Searle Scholars Program

Internal MSU Letter of Intent (LOI) due: July 9, 2018
Full Proposal due: Sept. 28, 2018

The Searle Scholars Program supports research of outstanding individuals who have recently begun their appointment at the Assistant Professor level, and whose appointment is their first tenure-track position. Grants are $300,000 for a three-year term with $100,000 payable each year of the grant, subject to the receipt of acceptable progress reports. Generally, the program makes 15 new grants annually.

Applicants for the 2019 competition (awards which will be activated on July 1, 2019) are expected to be pursuing independent research careers in biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, immunology, neuroscience, pharmacology, and related areas in chemistry, medicine, and the biological sciences. Applicants should have begun their appointment as an independent investigator at the assistant professor level on or after July 1, 2017. The appointment must be their first tenure-track position (or its nearest equivalent).

MSU is invited to nominate one (1) individual to apply. If you are interested in being nominated for the 2019 Searle Scholars Program, please submit your whitepaper following the process below. Likewise, Department Heads and Deans may submit nominations for excellent nominees using these same instructions.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a "Limited Submission Pre-Proposal" and select the sponsor, "Searle Scholars Program (SEASCH) [P]," and the program, "Searle Scholars Program."
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages. The LOI should address the research that will be undertaken with the Searle award as well as how the award will advance your career as an independent scientist. Please carefully review the Searle website (program link below) for program priorities and eligibility.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is Monday, July 9, 2018. The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select one nomination to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by September 28, 2018. The Office of Sponsored Programs will submit the nomination on behalf of the institution and then provide the nominee with login instructions where the application resides.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist, at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

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The NCI Predoctoral to Postdoctoral Fellow Transition Award (F99/K00)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Internal MSU LOI due: Nov. 19, 2018
Agency LOI due: 30 days before application due date
Full submission due: Feb. 22, 2019

SYNOPSIS: The purpose of the NCI Predoctoral to Postdoctoral Fellow Transition Award (F99/K00) is to encourage and retain outstanding graduate students recognized by their institutions for their high potential and strong interest in pursuing careers as independent cancer researchers. The award will facilitate the transition of talented graduate students into successful cancer research postdoctoral appointments, and provide opportunities for career development activities relevant to their long-term career goals of becoming independent cancer researchers. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) does not allow applicants to propose to lead an independent clinical trial, but does allow applicants to propose research experience in a clinical trial led by a sponsor or co-sponsor.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The objective of the NCI Predoctoral to Postdoctoral Fellow Transition Award (F99/K00) is to identify and encourage outstanding graduate students who are recognized by their institutions as having high potential and strong interest in pursuing careers as independent cancer researchers, and then to facilitate their successful transition to postdoctoral positions.

The F99/K00 award is intended for individuals who require 1-2 years to complete their Ph.D. dissertation research training (F99 phase) before transitioning to mentored postdoctoral research training (K00 phase). Consequently, applicants are expected to propose an individualized research training plan for the next 1-2 years of dissertation research training and a plan for 3-4 years of mentored postdoctoral research and career development activities that will prepare them for independent cancer-focused research careers.

The F99/K00 award is meant to provide up to 6 years of support in two phases. The initial (F99) phase will provide support for 1-2 years of dissertation research (final experiments, dissertation preparation, and selection of a postdoctoral mentor). The transition (K00) phase will provide up to 4 years of mentored postdoctoral research and career development support, contingent upon successful completion of the doctoral degree requirements and securing a cancer-focused postdoctoral position. The two award phases are intended to be continuous in time. A K00 award will be made only to a PD/PI who has successfully completed the F99-supported training, secured a cancer-focused postdoctoral appointment, and provided NCI with a strong research and career development plan.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a Limited Submission Pre-Proposal and select the sponsor, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the program, The NCI Predoctoral to Postdoctoral Fellow Transition Award (F99/K00).
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is November 19, 2018.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by February 22, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu, Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist at ebrock@montana.edu, or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

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Macy Faculty Scholars Program
Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation

Internal MSU Letter of Intent (LOI) due: Jan. 14, 2019
Full Proposal due to Agency: Feb. 13, 2019

The Macy Faculty Faculty Scholars Program is designed to identify and nurture the careers of promising educational innovators in medicine and nursing. The program aims to develop the next generation of national leaders in medical and nursing education. The program will support the Macy Faculty Scholars in leading new educational innovations at their home institutions and will provide opportunities for further career development through national meetings and participation in other Macy activities.

Five awards of up to $100,000 (plus fringe) will be awarded per year for two years. In addition, Scholars will receive funding to participate in the Harvard Macy Institute programs, for travel to the Annual Macy Faculty Scholars Meeting, and for other program-related travel.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a Limited Submission Pre-Proposal and select the sponsor, Josiah Macy Foundation (JOSMAC) [P], and the program, Macy Jr Foundation Macy Faculty Scholars.
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is Monday January 14, 2019.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by February 13, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist, at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

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Shakespeare in American Communities: Schools
National Endowment for the Arts

Agency Letter of Intent (LOI) due: Dec. 7, 2018
Full Application due: Feb. 14, 2019

Shakespeare in American Communities, a national theater program of the National Endowment for the Arts in cooperation with Arts Midwest, brings high-quality professional productions of Shakespeare's plays to middle- and high-school students in underserved schools across the United States.

Arts Midwest currently is inviting proposals from nonprofit theater companies to perform works by Shakespeare for middle- and high-school students between August 1, 2019, and July 31, 2020. Grants will be awarded to up to 40 theater companies to support performances and related educational activities for students from a minimum of 10 schools. Applicant review will be based on artistic excellence and merit. The standard grant award is $25,000. Grants must be matched one-to-one from other sources.

Applicants must be a U.S.-based nonprofit, tax-exempt 501(c)(3) theater company that compensates all professional performers and supporting professional personnel at no less than the prevailing minimum compensation; have produced Shakespeare or classically-based repertoire within the past five years; and have a minimum of three years' experience providing performances and educational activities to middle and/or high schools.

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2018 CTR-IN Pilot Projects Program (CP3)
Mountain West Research Consortium

Internal MSU Applicant Nominations due: Mar. 12, 2018
Nominations due to Agency: Mar. 28, 2018

The overall objective of the CTR-IN Pilot Projects Program (CP3) is to develop a culture of collaborative multidisciplinary clinical and translational health disparities research within and across western IDeA institutions to positively impact health in our communities.

To achieve this objective, the CP3 supports three pilot funding mechanisms:

  1. Health Disparities Pilot Projects. These awards are intended for single Principal Investigator projects that are focused on a health disparity. The CP3 core will work closely with the BERD, Community Engagement and Outreach and Administrative Cores to define our focus on health disparity research areas to ultimately identify at risk population(s). The goal of this clinical or translational research project should be to generate the key preliminary data that will allow the investigator to subsequently submit a competitive extramural grant application to NIH or other funders.

  2. Multisite Pilot Projects (MSPPs). Nationally successful clinical trials research often involves multiple recruitment and implementation sites. To model and support \"gold-standard\" approaches for nationally competitive clinical trials research, the CP3 administers larger-scale multisite pilot projects. Each MSPP will involve participant recruitment through a minimum of two of the 13 partner institutions. The projects typically will be led by a more experienced investigator but can include junior investigators at partnering sites. The MSPP goal is to build the necessary infrastructure to address regional health disparities in the MW region and to compete nationally for multisite clinical trials and related research.

  3. Developmental Translational Team Grants (DTTG). To foster the CTR goal of cross-disciplinary integration of basic, clinical, and translational research, the CP3 will coordinate with other IDeA programs to support small team-building grants. Faculty at our partner institutions include a broad cohort of IDeA-supported basic science, preclinical investigators (e.g., INBRE, COBRE) and clinical investigators, yielding opportunities for building teams and leveraging core resources to advance research among faculty from these various backgrounds for the greater benefit to patients and communities.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a \"Limited Submission Pre-Proposal\" and select the sponsor, \"Mountain West Research Consortium (MOUWES013) [P],\" and the program, \"2018 CTR-IN Pilot Projects Program (CP3).\"
  2. Include your Applicant Nomination as an attachment on the clearance form. The attachment must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format.
  3. The deadline for the Internal MSU Applicant Nominations is Monday, March 12, 2018.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select nominations to go forward to the Sponsor. MSU may send up to four applicant nominations for the Health Disparities Pilot Grant, and up to one applicant nomination where MSU will serve as Lead site. All nominations will be due at the Sponsor by March 28, 2018. CTR-IN will notify MSU as to which applicants may submit a full application.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist, at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

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EPSCoR Research Infrastructure Improvement Program: Track-2 Focused EPSCoR Collaborations (RII Track-2 FEC)
National Science Foundation

Internal MSU LOI due: Oct. 29, 2018
Agency LOI due: Nov. 26, 2018
Full Application due: Jan. 25, 2019

The Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) is designed to fulfill the mandate of the National Science Foundation (NSF) to promote scientific progress nationwide. Through this program, NSF establishes partnerships with government, higher education, and industry that are designed to effect sustainable improvements in a jurisdiction's research infrastructure, Research and Development (R&D) capacity, and hence, its R&D competitiveness.

RII Track-2 FEC builds interjurisdictional collaborative teams of EPSCoR investigators in scientific focus areas consistent with NSF priorities. Projects are investigator-driven and must include researchers from at least two RII- eligible jurisdictions with complementary expertise and resources necessary to tackle those projects, which neither party could address as well or rapidly alone.

The Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) research and education activities should seek to broaden participation through the strategic inclusion and integration of different types of individuals, institutions, and sectors throughout the project. Proposals must describe a comprehensive and integrated vision to drive discovery and build sustainable STEM capacity that exemplifies diversity of all types (individual, institutional, geographic, and disciplinary). The development of diverse early-career faculty is a critical component of this sustainable STEM capacity.

For FY 2019, RII Track-2 FEC proposals are invited on a single topic: "Harnessing the Data Revolution to solve problems of national importance."

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a "Limited Submission Pre-Proposal" and select the sponsor, "National Science Foundation (NSF) [F]," and the program, "EPSCoR Research Infrastructure Improvement Program: Track-2 Focused EPSCoR Collaborations (RII Track-2 FEC)."
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages. PIs may use the NSF LOI format as instructed in the funding opportunity announcement.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is Monday, October 29, 2018.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by January 25, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist, at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

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NIH Blueprint Program for Enhancing Neuroscience Diversity through Undergraduate Research Education Experiences (R25)
National Institutes of Health

Internal MSU Letter of Intent (LOI) due: Oct. 15, 2018
Agency LOI due: Jan. 15, 2019
Full Application due: Feb. 15, 2019

The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research education activities in the mission areas of the NIH. The over-arching goal of this NIH Blueprint R25 program is to encourage individuals from diverse backgrounds, including those from groups underrepresented in the biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research workforce, to pursue further studies or careers in research.

To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on Courses for Skills Development, Research Experiences, and Mentoring Activities.

The fully integrated educational activities should prepare undergraduate students from diverse backgrounds, including those from groups underrepresented in biomedical and behavioral sciences, to enter Ph.D. degree programs in the neurosciences. To accomplish this goal, this initiative will provide institutional awards to develop neuroscience research education programs comprised of collaborative partnerships integrated across different educational institution types.

Each partnership must include: a) one or more institutions that either: 1) have a historical and current mission to educate students from any of the populations that have been identified as underrepresented in biomedical research as defined by the National Science Foundation NSF, see http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/wmpd/) (i.e., African Americans or Blacks, Hispanic or Latino Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, U.S. Pacific Islanders, and persons with disabilities) or 2) have a documented track record of recruiting, training and/or educating, and graduating underrepresented students as defined by NSF (see above), which has resulted in increasing the institution's contribution to the national pool of graduates from underrepresented backgrounds who pursue biomedical research careers; b) a research-intensive institution that has an established neuroscience or neuroscience-related program; c) integrated curriculum/academic enhancement and research experience activities designed to increase participants' preparation to enter doctoral programs in the neurosciences; and d) well-described plans to provide early communication and interaction between participating students and graduate neuroscience programs across the country.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a "Limited Submission Pre-Proposal" and select the sponsor, "National Institutes of Health (NIH) [F]," and the program, "NIH Blueprint Program for Enhancing Neuroscience through Undergraduate Research Education Experiences (R25)."
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is Monday, October 15, 2018.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by February 15, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu ; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist, at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

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RFA-ES-15-020--Outstanding New Environmental Scientist (ONES) Award (R01)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Internal MSU LOI due: Nov. 9, 2018
Agency LOI due: 30 days before application due date
Full submission due: Feb. 28, 2019

SYNOPSIS: An essential element of the mission of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is the support and career promotion of the next generation of exceptionally talented and creative new scientists who will further the understanding of the impact of environmental exposures on human health. The NIEHS supports a number of training and fellowship programs for pre and postdoctoral training, and mentored career development awards for faculty in the early stages of their career development.  Along with these training and career development programs, NIEHS initiated a program of research grants for Early Stage Investigators, The Outstanding New Environmental Scientist (ONES) Award, that is designed to identify the best new biomedical investigators across the spectrum of science supported by the NIEHS (i.e., including basic mechanistic, clinical and population based researchers) and facilitate their establishing a vibrant, independent research program in the environmental health sciences. NIEHS uses this FOA to support the NIEHS goal of assuring a continuing cadre of productive environmental health science investigators.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The ONES program is designed to identify outstanding scientists at the formative stages of their career and assist them in launching an innovative research program with a defined impact in the environmental health sciences. These R01 research grants are targeted for researchers who are defined by the NIH as Early Stage Investigators (see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/new_investigators/index.htm).

The ONES program is designed to be highly competitive, and only a limited number are awarded per year.

Research programs supported by this announcement seek to promote career advancement of the most highly creative and promising new scientists who intend to make a long-term career commitment to research in the mainstream of the environmental health sciences, and bring innovative, ground-breaking research initiatives and thinking to bear on the problems of how environmental exposures affect human health.

The ONES Program is specifically targeted to Early Stage Investigators and program goals include career promotion as well as the scientific project proposed.  Applications for the ONES program differ from standard R01 applications in that applicants must describe plans for the active participation of an external advisory committee to provide consultation and feedback, commitment by the institution to actively support the research program development of the Program Director/Principal Investigator (PD/PI), and a plan for career enhancement which will provide a strong foundation for future research endeavors.  See Section IV.2 for detailed application instructions.   

Research projects proposed in response to this FOA will be expected to have a defined impact on the environmental health sciences and be responsive to both the mission of the NIH and, specifically, to the mission of the NIEHS and the NIEHS 2012-2017 Strategic plan, Advancing Science, Improving Health: A Plan for Environmental Health Sciences Research. This plan sets out a set of strategic themes and strategic goals that have been identified as priority areas for the field of environmental health sciences.  These reflect both the mission of the NIEHS, which is to discover how the environment affects people in order to promote healthier lives, and the vision of NIEHS to provide global leadership for innovative research that improves public health by preventing disease and disability.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a Limited Submission Pre-Proposal and select the sponsor, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the program, RFA-ES-020-Outstanding New Environmental Scientist (ONES) Award (R01).
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is November 9, 2018.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by February 28, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu, Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist at ebrock@montana.edu, or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

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Silvio O. Conte Digestive Diseases Research Core Centers (P30)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Internal MSU LOI due: Nov. 16, 2018
Agency LOI due: 30 days before application due date
Full submission due: Mar. 7, 2019

SYNOPSIS: This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites applications for Silvio O. Conte Digestive Diseases Research Core Centers (DDRCCs). The DDRCCs are part of an integrated program of digestive and liver diseases research support provided by the NIDDK.  The purpose of this Centers program is to bring together basic and clinical investigators as a means to enhance communication, collaboration, and effectiveness of ongoing research related to digestive and/or liver diseases.  DDRCCs are based on the core concept, whereby shared resources aimed at fostering productivity, synergy, and new research ideas among the funded investigators are supported in a cost-effective manner.  Each proposed DDRCC must be organized around a central theme that reflects the focus of the digestive or liver diseases research of the Center members. The central theme must be within the primary mission of NIDDK, and not thematic areas for which other NIH Institutes or Centers are considered the primary source of NIH funding.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: The objective of the Silvio O. Conte Digestive Diseases Research Core Centers (DDRCCs) is to bring together, on a cooperative basis, basic and clinical investigators to enhance the effectiveness of their research related to digestive and/or liver diseases and their complications. DDRCCs are meant to improve communication among investigators and to integrate, coordinate, and foster interdisciplinary research involving the etiology, treatment, and prevention of digestive and/or liver diseases.  To accomplish this, the DDRCC supports a group of established investigators actively conducting programs of important, high-quality research that relates to a common theme in digestive diseases or liver diseases research. Thus, the purpose of a DDRCC is to provide the capability for accomplishments greater than those that would be possible by individual research project grant support alone.  Applicants should consult NIDDK staff concerning plans for the development of the DDRCC and the organization of the application.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a Limited Submission Pre-Proposal and select the sponsor, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the program, Silvio O. Conte Digestive Diseases Research Core Centers.
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is November 16, 2018.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by March 7, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu, Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist at ebrock@montana.edu, or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

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Library Short-Term Resident Research Fellowships
American Philosophical Society

Application due: Mar. 1, 2019

The American Philosophical Society Library offers short-term residential fellowships for conducting research in its collections. We are a leading international center for research in the history of American science and technology and its European roots, as well as early American history and culture.

The Library houses more than 11 million manuscript items, 350,000 volumes of printed materials, thousands of maps and prints, and more than a thousand hours of audio recordings of Native American languages. Collections are renowned for their depth and interdisciplinary strengths in diverse fields, including Early American History and Culture to 1840; Atlantic History; Intellectual History; Travel, Exploration and Expeditions; History of Science, Technology and Medicine; History of Biochemistry, Physiology and Biophysics including 20th-Century Medical Research; History of Eugenics and Genetics; History of Physics, especially Quantum Physics; History of Natural History in the 18th and 19th Centuries; Anthropology, particularly Native American History, Culture and Languages; and Caribbean and Slavery Studies. The Library does not hold materials on philosophy in the modern sense.

Applicants in any relevant field of scholarship may apply. Candidates who live 75 or more miles from Philadelphia receive some preference. The duration of award is requested by the candidate, but the final decision is made by the Fellowship Committee.

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Phillips Fund for Native American Research
American Philosophical Society

Application due: Mar. 1, 2019

The Phillips Fund of the American Philosophical Society provides grants for research in Native American linguistics, ethnohistory, and the history of studies of Native Americans, in the continental United States and Canada.

The grants are intended for such costs as travel, tapes, films, and consultant fees. Grants are not made for projects in archaeology, ethnography, or psycholinguistics; for the purchase of permanent equipment; or for the preparation of pedagogical materials. The committee distinguishes ethnohistory from contemporary ethnography as the study of cultures and cultural change through time.

The committee prefers to support the work of younger scholars who have received the doctorate. Applications are also accepted from graduate students for research on master theses or doctoral dissertations.

The average award is about $3,000; grants do not exceed $3,500.

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Advanced Computing Systems & Services: Adapting to the Rapid Evolution of Science and Engineering Research
National Science Foundation

Internal MSU Letter of Intent (LOI) due: Dec. 31, 2018
Full Application due to Agency: Mar. 4, 2019

The intent of this solicitation is to request proposals from organizations willing to serve as service providers (SPs) within the NSF Innovative High-Performance Computing (HPC) program to provide advanced cyberinfrastructure (CI) capabilities and/or services in production operations to support the full range of computational- and data-intensive research across all of science and engineering (S&E). The current solicitation is intended to complement previous NSF investments in advanced computational infrastructure by provisioning resources, broadly defined in this solicitation to include systems and/or services, in two categories:

  • Category I, Capacity Systems: production computational resources maximizing the capacity provided to support the broad range of computation and data analytics needs in S&E research; and
  • Category II, Innovative Prototypes/Testbeds: innovative forward-looking capabilities deploying novel technologies, architectures, usage modes, etc., and exploring new target applications, methods, and paradigms for S&E discoveries.

Resources supported through awards from this solicitation will be incorporated into and allocated as part of the NSF Innovative HPC program. This program complements investments in leadership-class computing and funds a federation of nationally-available HPC resources that are technically diverse and intended to enable discoveries at a computational scale beyond the research of individual or regional academic institutions.

NSF anticipates that at least 90 percent of the provisioned system or services will be available to the S&E community through an open peer-reviewed national allocation process and be supported by community and other support services or an NSF-approved alternative that may emerge. If this is not feasible for the proposed system/services, proposers must clearly explain in detail why this is the case and how they intend to make the proposed system/services available to the national S&E community.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a Limited Submission Pre-Proposal and select the sponsor, National Science Foundation (NSF) [F], and the program, Advanced Computing Systems & Services: Adapting to the Rapid Evolution of Science and Engineering Research.
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is Monday, December 31, 2018.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by March 4, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist, at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

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Biomedical Research Facilities (C06)
National Institutes of Health

Internal MSU Letter of Intent (LOI) due: Jan. 11, 2019
Agency LOI due: Feb. 1, 2019
Full Application to Agency: Mar. 4, 2019

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites qualified academic institutions to apply for support to modernize existing or construct new biomedical research facilities. Applications will be accepted from public and nonprofit private institutions of higher education. Applications from both research-intensive institutions and Institutions of Emerging Excellence in biomedical research from all geographic regions in the nation are strongly encouraged.

NIH recognizes the importance of all institutions of higher learning in contributing to the U.S. research capacity. The goal of this FOA is to upgrade or create novel biomedical research infrastructure to strengthen biomedical research programs. The proposed project must serve the applicant-defined institution-wide biomedical research needs. Each project is expected to provide long-term improvements to the institutional research infrastructure. Targeted are the modernization of core facilities and the development of other infrastructure serving an institution-wide research community on a shared basis.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a Limited Submission Pre-Proposal and select the sponsor, National Institutes of Health (NIH) [F], and the program, Biomedical Research Facilities (C06).
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is Friday, January 11, 2019.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by March 4, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist, at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

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EPSCoR Research Infrastructure Improvement Track 4: EPSCoR Research Fellows (RII Track-4)
National Science Foundation

Internal MSU Letter of Intent (LOI) due: Jan. 7, 2019
Full Proposal due to Agency: Mar. 12, 2019

The Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) is designed to fulfill the mandate of the National Science Foundation (NSF) to promote scientific progress nationwide. Through this program, NSF establishes partnerships with government, higher education, and industry that are designed to effect sustainable improvements in a research infrastructure, Research and Development (R&D) capacity, and hence, its R&D competitiveness.

RII Track-4 provides opportunities for non-tenured investigators to further develop their individual research potential through extended collaborative visits to premier private, governmental, or academic research centers. During these visits, the EPSCoR Research Fellows will be able to learn new techniques, develop new collaborations or advance existing partnerships, benefit from access to unique equipment and facilities, and/or shift their research toward potentially transformative new directions.

The experiences gained through the fellowships are intended to have lasting impacts that will enhance the research trajectories of the Fellows well beyond the award period. These benefits to the Fellows are also expected to in turn improve the research capacity of their institutions and jurisdictions more broadly. Those submitting proposals must either hold a non-tenured faculty appointment at an institution of higher education or an early-career career-track appointment at an eligible non-degree-granting institution.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a "Limited Submission Pre-Proposal" and select the sponsor, "National Science Foundation (NSF) [F]," and the program, "EPSCoR Research Infrastructure Improvement Track 4: EPSCoR Research Fellows (RII Track-4)."
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is Monday January 7, 2019.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by March 12, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist, at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

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NSF Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM)
National Science Foundation

Internal MSU LOI due: Oct. 1, 2018
Full Application due: Mar. 27, 2019

SYNOPSIS: A well-educated science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce is a significant contributor to maintaining the competitiveness of the U.S. in the global economy.  The National Science Foundation (NSF) Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) program addresses the need for a high quality STEM workforce in STEM disciplines supported by the program and for the increased success of low-income academically talented students with demonstrated financial need who are pursuing associate, baccalaureate, or graduate degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) [6][16]

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Recognizing that financial aid alone cannot increase retention and graduation in STEM, the program provides awards to Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) to fund scholarships and to advance the adaptation, implementation, and study of effective evidence-based curricular and co-curricular activities that support recruitment, retention, transfer (if appropriate), student success, academic/career pathways, and graduation in STEM. The S-STEM program encourages collaborations among different types of partners: Partnerships among different types of institutions; collaborations of STEM faculty and institutional, educational, and social science researchers; and partnerships among institutions of higher education and local business and industry, if appropriate. 

The program seeks: 1) to increase the number of low-income academically talented students with demonstrated financial need obtaining degrees in STEM and entering the workforce or graduate programs in STEM; 2) to improve the education of future scientists, engineers, and technicians, with a focus on academically talented low-income students; and 3) to generate knowledge to advance understanding of how  factors or evidence-based curricular and co-curricular activities affect  the success, retention, transfer, academic/career pathways, and graduation in STEM of low-income students.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a "Limited Submission Pre-Proposal" and select the sponsor, "National Science Foundation", and the program, "NSF Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (S-STEM)."
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is October 1, 2018. The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by March 27, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu, Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist at ebrock@montana.edu, or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

View Program URL


2019 CTR-IN Pilot Grant Funding Opportunities
Mountain West (MW) Clinical Translational Research Infrastructure Network (CTR-IN)

Internal MSU Applicant Nominations due: Feb. 15, 2019
Nominations due to Agency: Feb. 28, 2019

The mission of the MW CTR-IN Program is to build clinical and translational research capacity and facilitate extramural funding success among investigators with faculty appointments at the 13 MW university partners. Our thematic focus is to address health disparities in our regions. In the past five years, the MW CTR-IN Program has provided over $6M in pilot grant funding to more than 80 investigators at our partner universities.

To achieve this objective, the Mountain West Research Consortium supports two pilot funding mechanisms for 2019:

  1. Health Disparities Pilot Grant (Single Institution). The purpose of this funding opportunity is to provide promising early career investigators with support to capture the key preliminary data that will support and inform a competitive R-level grant application to NIH or other extramural funding sources. Research Emphasis: Pilot projects focused on health disparities (or health inequalities). Health disparities can have different meanings and interpretations depending on the setting and population being studied. In general, health disparities are differences in the incidence, prevalence, mortality, access to care and burden of diseases, and other adverse health conditions that exist among specific population groups.

  2. Multi-Site Pilot Projects (MSPP). The purpose of this funding opportunity is to provide pilot project support for a multi-site CTR project with the expectation that this project will yield the key preliminary data to facilitate a large-scale multi-site extramural grant application. Research Emphasis: Priority will be given to projects focused on health disparities.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a Limited Submission Pre-Proposal and select the sponsor, Mountain West Research Consortium (MOUWES013) [P], and the program, 2019 CTR-IN Pilot Grant Funding Opportunities.
  2. Include your Applicant Nomination as an attachment on the clearance form. The attachment must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format.
  3. The deadline for the Internal MSU Applicant Nominations is Friday, February 15, 2019. The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select nominations to go forward to the Sponsor. MSU may send up to four applicant nominations for the Health Disparities Pilot Grant, and up to one applicant nomination for the Multi-Site Pilot Projects where MSU will serve as the Lead site. All nominations will be due at the Sponsor by February 28, 2019. CTR-IN will notify MSU as to which applicants may submit a full application.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist, at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

View Program URL


High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Internal MSU Letter of Intent (LOI) due: Mar. 8, 2019
Full proposal due: May 31, 2019

NOTE: The Request for Applications does not identify this program as a limited submission but the Office of Research and Economic Development would like to manage it as such to ensure the most competitive proposals are put forward to the funder given the importance of the opportunity. 

SYNOPSIS: The High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems. The minimum award is $600,001 of direct costs. The maximum award is $2,000,000 of direct costs. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffraction systems, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and confocal microscopes, cell-sorters, and biomedical imagers.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this funding opportunity is to continue the High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program administered by ORIP. The objective of the Program is to make available to institutions expensive research instruments that can only be justified on a shared-use basis and that are needed for NIH-supported projects in basic, translational or clinical areas of biomedical/behavioral research. The HEI Program provides funds to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instrument or an integrated instrumentation system. An integrated instrumentation system is one in which the components, when used in conjunction with one another, perform a function that no single component could provide. The components must be dedicated to the system and not used independently.

Types of supported instruments include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffractometers, mass and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and light microscopes, cell sorters, and biomedical imagers. Applications for stand alone computer systems (supercomputers, computer clusters and data storage systems) will only be considered if the instrument is solely dedicated to the research needs of NIH-supported investigators.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp. Prepare a Limited Submission Pre-Proposal and select the sponsor, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the program, High-End Instrumentation Grant Program.
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is March 8, 2019.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by May 31, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

View Program URL


Shared Instrumentation Grant (SIG) Program
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Internal MSU LOI due: Mar. 8, 2019
Full proposal due: May 31, 2019

NOTE: The Request for Applications does not identify this program as a limited submission but the Office of Research and Economic Development would like to manage it as such to ensure the most competitive proposals are put forward to the funder given the importance of the opportunity. 

SYNOPSIS: The Shared Instrument Grant (SIG) Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems. The minimum award is $50,000 of direct costs. There is no maximum price limit for the instrument; however, the maximum award is $600,000 of direct costs. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffractometers, mass spectrometers, nuclear magnetic resonance, spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and light microscopes, cell sorters, and biomedical imagers.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this funding opportunity is to continue the Shared Instrumentation Grant (SIG) Program administered by ORIP. The objective of the Program is to make available to institutions expensive research instruments that can only be justified on a shared-use basis and that are needed for NIH-supported projects in basic, translational or clinical biomedical and bio-behavioral research. The SIG Program provides funds to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, state-of-the-art, specialized, commercially available instrument or an integrated instrumentation system. An integrated instrumentation system is one in which the components, when used in conjunction with one another, perform a function that no single component could provide. The components must be dedicated to the system and not used independently.

Types of supported instruments include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffractometers, mass spectrometers, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and light microscopes, cell sorters, and biomedical imagers. Applications for stand alone computer systems (supercomputers, computer clusters and data storage systems) will only be considered if the system is solely dedicated to biomedical research. All instruments, integrated systems, and computer systems must be dedicated to research only.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a Limited Submission Pre-Proposal and select the sponsor, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the program, Shared Instrumentation Grant (SIG) Program.
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is March 8, 2019.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by May 31, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, micaelayoung@montana.edu; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

View Program URL


Commercialization Initiation Program
MJ Murdock Charitable Trust

Internal MSU LOI due: Nov. 9, 2018
Full submission due: June 1, 2019

SYNOPSIS: Launched in 2015, this program supports the commercialization of bench discoveries at a select group of major research universities in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington -- critical work that helps bring valuable research discoveries to market. We consider only the highest-priority project from each institution from the natural sciences, medicine and engineering, and we look to support projects that create a true inflection point for commercialization. (We will dismiss projects designed only to generate data for a subsequent research grant application.)

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a Limited Submission Pre-Proposal and select the sponsor, MJ Murdock Charitable Trust (MJMUR), and the program, Commercialization Initiation Program.
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is November 9, 2018.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by June 1, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu, Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist at ebrock@montana.edu, or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

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Montana Healthcare Foundation Grants
Montana Healthcare Foundation

Webinar: Feb. 13, 2019, 1:00 p.m. MST
Internal MSU Letter of Intent (LOI) due: Feb. 14, 2019
Full Application due to Agency: May 30, 2019

The Montana Healthcare Foundation (MHCF) awards grants to improve the health and well-being of all Montanans. For 2019, we are pleased to announce this competitive Call for Proposals (CFP).

We will consider proposals in three areas under this CFP:

  • American Indian Health
  • Behavioral Health
  • Partnerships for Better Health

Under the 2019 CFP, MSU (main campus - VPRED) may submit up to three distinct proposals; MSU Alumni Foundation may also submit three distinct proposals. Contact the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP) (Micaela Young, Elizabeth Brock, or Sandy Sward; email addresses below) to discuss your proposal and determine to which entity to apply.

Projects funded through this CFP will address key health and health care challenges and will address the upstream social, economic, and educational challenges that drive health disparities. We place a priority on proposals that have a high potential for becoming financially self-sustaining.

Project Examples

Please note that these are only examples, and we will gladly consider funding other types of projects if they meet our basic selection criteria.

  • Interventions that address upstream risk factors for health disparities/social determinants of health: Projects that address health determinants--such as limited opportunities for youth engagement, poor educational outcomes, inadequate community support for seniors, unemployment, or lack of access to healthful foods--through partnerships with organizations outside the health sector.

  • Direct collaboration among community agencies (for example, sharing personnel or facilities), such as local health departments, rural hospitals, community mental health and substance use disorder treatment organizations, and community health centers to address a major health issue: Initiatives that seek to address an important health challenge--such as serving the needs of the aging population, reducing childhood injuries, or improving diabetes outcomes--through new inter-agency collaborations.

  • Community health teams and other approaches to care coordination, case management, and community outreach: Providers are experimenting with a range of models that improve the quality and effectiveness of care by reaching beyond the walls of the clinic or hospital. Nurse care coordinators, community health workers, and promotoras are examples of such efforts.

An overview webinar will be provided on Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019 at 1:00 p.m. MST. Use the following link to register: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_xuwf5yQxSrGSn_6Hwau_7w

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a Limited Submission Pre-Proposal and select the sponsor, Montana Healthcare Foundation (MONHEA012) [P], and the program, Montana Healthcare Foundation Grants.
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is Thursday, February 14, 2019.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by May 30, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist, at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

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2019 Pathway Program
American Diabetes Program

Internal MSU LOI due: Mar. 8, 2019
Full proposal due: July 1, 2019

SYNOPSIS: Pathway to Stop Diabetes is a bold, innovative initiative designed to radically transform diabetes research. Our Vision is simple yet revolutionary: find a new generation of brilliant scientists at the peak of their creativity, and provide them with freedom, autonomy, and the financial and professional resources to set them on the road to breakthrough discoveries. This initiative enables scientists to advance not only their research, but also their careers. Pathway scientists have access to the Mentor Advisory Group, an annual Pathway symposia, select speaking opportunities, and innovative technologies, all designed to foster interactions and collaboration that will enable them to accelerate their research progress.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: Pathway seeks to bring new investigators and new perspectives to diabetes research. Supporting scientists with different backgrounds and experience is critical to achieving that objective. Pathway accepts nominations for exceptional investigators with medical and scientific backgrounds who propose innovative basic, clinical, translational, behavioral, epidemiological and health services research relevant to any type of diabetes, diabetes-related disease state or complication. Pathway solicits nominations for candidates in all disciplines as applied to diabetes including medicine, biology, chemistry, computing, physics, mathematics and engineering. In addition, nomination of scientists from diverse backgrounds, including minority groups that are underrepresented in biomedical research, is strongly encouraged. 

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a Limited Submission Pre-Proposal and select the sponsor, American Diabetes Association (AMEDIA), and the program, 2019 Pathway Program.
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is March 8, 2019The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by July 1, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, micaelayoung@montana.edu; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist, at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

View Program URL


William T. Grant Scholars Program
William T. Grant Foundation (WTGFOU)

Internal MSU LOI due: Mar. 8, 2019
Full proposal due: July 2, 2019

SYNOPSIS: The William T. Grant Scholars Program supports career development for promising early-career researchers. The program funds five-year research and mentoring plans that significantly expand researchers\\\\\\\' expertise in new disciplines, methods, and content areas. Applicants should have a track record of conducting high-quality research and an interest in pursuing a significant shift in their trajectories as researchers. We recognize that early-career researchers are rarely given incentives or support to take measured risks in their work, so this award includes a mentoring component, as well as a supportive academic community.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a Limited Submission Pre-Proposal and select the sponsor, William T. Grant Foundation (WTGFOU), and the program, William T. Grant Scholars Program.
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is March 8, 2019.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by July 2, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist, at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

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NIH Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Internal MSU LOI due: Mar. 8, 2019
LOI due to Sponsor: June 10, 2019
Full proposal due: July 9, 2019

SYNOPSIS: The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research education activities in the mission areas of the NIH. The over-arching goal of this NIGMS R25 program is to support educational activities that complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the national biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs. To this end, this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) encourages the development of innovative educational activities for pre-kindergarten to grade 12 (P-12), pre-service and in-service teachers (Teachers) and students from underserved communities with a focus on Courses for Skills Development, Research Experiences, Mentoring Activities, Curriculum or Methods Development and Outreach.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research educational activities that complement other formal training programs in the mission areas of the NIH Institutes and Centers. The over-arching goals of the NIH R25 program are to: (1) complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the national biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs; (2) enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce; (3) help recruit individuals with specific specialty or disciplinary backgrounds to research careers in biomedical, behavioral and clinical sciences; and (4) foster a better understanding of biomedical, behavioral and clinical research and its implications.

The over-arching goal of this NIGMS R25 program is to support educational activities that complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the national biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs.  To assure the vitality and continued productivity of the research enterprise, the NIGMS provides leadership in training the next generation of scientists, in enhancing the diversity of the scientific workforce and in developing research capacities throughout the country. The SEPA program supports P-12 and informal science education (ISE) activities that: (1) enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce and (2) foster a better understanding of NIH-funded biomedical, behavioral and clinical research and its public health implications. Applications that target P-12 or ISE topics that may not be addressed by existing school, community or ISE-based activities are encouraged.  Proposed projects may focus on any area of NIH-funded research.  

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a Limited Submission Pre-Proposal and select the sponsor, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the program, NIH Science Education Partnerships Award (SEPA).
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is March 8, 2019.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by July 9, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist, at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

View Program URL


William T. Grant Scholars Program
William T. Grant Foundation

Internal MSU LOI due: Mar. 1, 2019
Full Application due to Agency: July 2, 2019

The William T. Grant Scholars Program supports career development for promising early-career researchers. The program funds five-year research and mentoring plans that significantly expand researcher expertise in new disciplines, methods, and content areas.

Applicants should have a track record of conducting high-quality research and an interest in pursuing a significant shift in their trajectories as researchers. We recognize that early-career researchers are rarely given incentives or support to take measured risks in their work, so this award includes a mentoring component, as well as a supportive academic community.

Awards are based on the potential of applicants to become influential researchers, as well as their plans to expand their expertise in new and significant ways. The application should make a cohesive argument for how the applicant will expand his or her expertise. The research plan should evolve in conjunction with the development of new expertise, and the mentoring plan should describe how the proposed mentors will support applicants in acquiring that expertise. Proposed research plans must address questions that are relevant to policy and practice in the focus areas of the Foundation.

Internal MSU Procedure:

  1. Use the Office of Sponsored Programs electronic proposal clearance form available at http://www.montana.edu/research/osp/. Prepare a Limited Submission Pre-Proposal and select the sponsor, William T. Grant Foundation (WTGFOU) [P], and the program, William T. Grant Scholars Program.
  2. Include your Letter of Intent (LOI, whitepaper) and CV as attachments on the clearance form. The attachments must be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format. The LOI/whitepaper can be two pages long and the maximum length for the CV is also two pages.
  3. The deadline for the internal MSU submission is Friday, March 1, 2019.  The MSU Research Council or subcommittee will review the submissions and select proposals to go forward to the Sponsor. Full proposals will be due at the Sponsor by July 2, 2019.
  4. The OSP Proposal Services office is available for assistance. Contact Micaela Young, Pre-Award Specialist, at micaelayoung@montana.edu; Elizabeth Brock, Pre-Award Specialist, at ebrock@montana.edu; or Sandy Sward, OSP Director, at ssward@montana.edu.

View Program URL

Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

Dear Colleague Letter: NSF/SBE Partnering in Round 4 of the Digging into Data Challenge
National Science Foundation

Dear Colleagues:

The purpose of this Dear Colleague Letter is to announce that the National Science Foundation's Directorate for Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences is partnering in the Trans-Atlantic Platform 2016 Digging into Data Challenge (T-AP DiD). Digging into Data is a grant competition open to international, collaborative projects that address research questions in humanities and/or social science disciplines by using new, large-scale, digital data analysis techniques.

The Digging into Data Challenge has been funding cutting-edge digital research in the humanities and social sciences since 2009. Now under the auspices of T-AP, the program's fourth round of competition will support collaborative research teams from three continents: Europe (Finland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Portugal and the United Kingdom); North America (Canada, Mexico, the United States); and South America (Brazil and Argentina).

T-AP is an unprecedented collaboration among key humanities and social science funders and facilitators from South America, North America and Europe. T-AP aims to enhance the ability of funders, research organizations and researchers to engage in transnational dialogue and collaboration. Among other activities, it works to identify common challenges and emerging priorities in social science and humanities research. T-AP also facilitates the formation of networks within the social sciences and humanities and helps connect them with other disciplines.

Sincerely,

Dr. Fay Lomax Cook
Assistant Director
Directorate for Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences

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Art Works
National Endowment for the Arts

Application due: Feb. 14, 2019

Art Works is the principal grants program of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). Through project-based funding, the NEA supports public engagement with, and access to, various forms of excellent art across the nation, the creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence, learning in the arts at all stages of life, and the integration of the arts into the fabric of community life. Projects may be large or small, existing or new, and may take place in any part of the nation's 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories.

Applications are encouraged for artistically excellent projects that address any of the following activities below:

  • Honor the 2020 centennial of women's voting rights in the United States (aka the Women's Suffrage Centennial)

  • Engage with Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Hispanic or Latino organizations; or the Native American, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian arts

  • Celebrate America's creativity and cultural heritage

  • Invite a dialogue that fosters a mutual respect for the diverse beliefs and values of all persons and groups

  • Enrich our humanity by broadening our understanding of ourselves as individuals and as asociety

Matching grants generally will range from $10,000 to $100,000. No grants will be made below $10,000. Grants of $100,000 or more will be made only in rare instances, and only for projects that we determine demonstrate exceptional national or regional significance and impact. In the past few years, well over half of the agency's grants have been for amounts less than $25,000.

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NEA Art Works 1, FY2020
National Endowment for the Arts

Application due: Feb. 14, 2019

Art Works is the National Endowment for the Arts' principal grants program. Through project-based funding, we support public engagement with, and access to, various forms of excellent art across the nation, the creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence, learning in the arts at all stages of life, and the integration of the arts into the fabric of community life. Projects may be large or small, existing or new, and may take place in any part of the nation's 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories.

We encourage applications for artistically excellent projects that address any of the following activities below:

  • Honor the 2020 centennial of women's voting rights in the United States (aka the Women's Suffrage Centennial).

  • Engage with Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Hispanic or Latino organizations; or the Native American, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian arts.

  • Celebrate America's creativity and cultural heritage.

  • Invite a dialogue that fosters a mutual respect for the diverse beliefs and values of all persons and groups.

  • Enrich our humanity by broadening our understanding of ourselves as individuals and as asociety.

Matching grants generally will range from $10,000 to $100,000. No grants will be made below $10,000. Grants of $100,000 or more will be made only in rare instances, and only for projects that we determine demonstrate exceptional national or regional significance and impact. In the past few years, well over half of the agency's grants have been for amounts less than $25,000.

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Landmarks of American History and Culture: Workshops for School Teachers
National Endowment for the Humanities

Application due: Feb. 21, 2019

The Landmarks of American History and Culture program supports a series of one-week workshops for K-12 educators across the nation that enhance and strengthen humanities teaching at the K-12 level. The program defines a landmark as a site of historic importance within the United States and its territories that offers educators a unique and compelling opportunity to deepen and expand their knowledge of the diverse histories, cultures, traditions, languages, and perspectives of the American people.

Projects employ a place-based approach, teaching historic sites through critical interpretation in order to explore central themes in American history and government, as well as in literature, art, music, and related humanities subjects. Each workshop must accommodate thirty-six participants (NEH Summer Scholars) and must be offered twice during the summer (for a total of seventy-two participants). The content, presenters, site visits, activities, and readings should be substantially the same in each week.

Workshops may be hosted by institutions such as community colleges, universities, four-year colleges, learned societies, libraries or other repositories, centers for advanced study, cultural organizations, professional associations, and schools or school systems. Host institutions provide facilities and arrange for accommodations for participants, who receive a stipend. NEH expects host institutions to furnish facilities conducive to scholarly engagement with topics and sites.

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Summer Seminars and Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
National Endowment for the Humanities

Application due: Feb. 21, 2019 (for Seminars and Institutes in Summer 2020)

NEH Summer Seminars and Institutes for Higher Education Faculty provide higher education faculty across the nation the opportunity to broaden and deepen their engagement with the humanities. The one- to four-week professional development programs allow participants (NEH Summer Scholars) to explore recent developments in scholarship, teaching, and/or curriculum through study of a variety of humanities topics.

NEH Summer Seminars and Institutes:

  • focus on the study and teaching of significant texts and other resources;

  • provide models of excellent scholarship and teaching;

  • contribute to the intellectual growth of the participants; and

  • build lasting communities of intellectual and professional collaboration.

A program may take place at a college, university, learned society, center for advanced study, library or other repository, cultural or professional organization, or school or school system. The host site must provide facilities for collegial interaction and scholarship. The program must be held only in the United States and its territories.

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Summer Seminars and Institutes for K-12 Educators
National Endowment for the Humanities

Application due: Feb. 21, 2019 (for Seminars and Institutes in Summer 2020)

NEH Summer Seminars and Institutes for K-12 Educators provide school teachers across the nation the opportunity to broaden and deepen their engagement with the humanities. One- to four-week residential programs, led by scholars and K-12 professionals, allow participants (NEH Summer Scholars) to study a variety of humanities topics. Seminars and Institutes focus on the intellectual quality of humanities education and address recent developments in scholarship, teaching, and/or curriculum.

NEH Summer Seminars and Institutes:

  • focus on the study and teaching of significant texts and other resources;

  • provide models of excellent scholarship and teaching;

  • contribute to the intellectual growth of the participants; and

  • build lasting communities of inquiry.

A program may take place at a college, university, learned society, center for advanced study, library or other repository, cultural or professional organization, or school or school system. The host site must provide facilities for collegial interaction and scholarship. The program may be held only in the United States and its territories.

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Integrating Biology and Social Science Knowledge (BioSS)
Russell Sage Foundation

Agency LOI due: Nov. 30, 2018
Full Application due (by invitation only): Mar. 4, 2019

Integrating Biology and Social Science Knowledge (BioSS) will support innovative social science research on social and economic outcomes that improves our understanding of the interactive mechanisms by which environmental influences affect biological mechanisms, and vice versa.

This includes research that: (1) estimates how the structured nature of the social environment and intra- and intergenerational social inequalities affect biological processes, (2) identifies which indicators of biological processes interact with the social environment to affect different life domains and how, and (3) yields new conceptual frameworks that holistically characterize the complex relationships among biological, psychological and environmental factors to predict a range of behavioral and social outcomes. We are primarily interested in research that explores and improves our understanding of social and economic predictors and outcomes.

Examples of the kinds of topics and questions that are of interest include, but are not restricted to, those listed below:

  • Perceptions of the Role of Biology in Human Behavior and Social and Economic Outcomes

  • The Hidden Costs of Social Mobility

  • Early and Later Life Adversity

  • Socioeconomic Status, Brain Development, and Academic Outcomes

  • Immigration

  • Neuroscience and Behavioral Economics

  • Risk vs. Resilience to Adversity

  • Biological Aging and Environment

  • Genes and Gene-Environment (GxE) Interactions

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NEA Literature Fellowships: Prose, FY2020
National Endowment for the Arts

Application due: Mar. 6, 2019

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Literature Fellowships program offers $25,000 grants in prose (fiction and creative nonfiction) and poetry to published creative writers that enable recipients to set aside time for writing, research, travel, and general career advancement. Applications are reviewed through an anonymous process in which the only criteria for review are artistic excellence and artistic merit. To review the applications, the National Endowment for the Arts assembles a different advisory panel every year. Panel members represent diverse backgrounds in geography, race and ethnicity, and artistic points of view.

The program operates on a two-year cycle with fellowships in prose and poetry available in alternating years. For FY 2020, which is covered by these guidelines, fellowships in prose (fiction and creative nonfiction) are available. Fellowships in poetry will be offered in FY 2021 and guidelines will be available in December 2019. You may apply only once each year.

Competition for fellowships is extremely rigorous. The NEA typically receives more than 1,500 applications each year in this category and award fellowships to fewer than 3 percent of all applicants. Applicants should consider carefully whether their work will be competitive at the national level.

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2019 Student Research Grant Program
Montana Academy of Sciences

Application due: Mar. 15, 2019

Montana Academy of Sciences (MAS) is pleased to announce the 2019 Student Research Grant Program, designed to award research grants to undergraduate and graduate students in the State of Montana. This year there will be two categories of competitive grants with total funding of $7,500. The first category is for three grants up to $1,500 per award, open to both graduate and undergraduate students. The second category ($3,000 total) is open to undergraduate students only, with award amounts up to $750 per award.

These competitive grants are intended to encourage and assist students with conducting scientific research projects at any of the universities, four-year colleges, or Tribal colleges in the State of Montana. Undergraduate and graduate students from all disciplines are welcome to submit a research proposal application to this program.  Disciplines of students that have been funded in the past include: biology (all sub-disciplines), biochemistry, chemistry, computer science, environmental and climate sciences, geology, physics, mathematics and the social sciences; as well as several interdisciplinary fields.

Awards will be announced at or shortly after the Annual Meeting (April 5-6, 2019). Awards will be disbursed by the end of April or early May for research during the summer and the next academic year.  Students who receive funding are expected to present an oral presentation of the results of their research at the 2020 MAS Annual Meeting.

It is the intent of the MAS Student Research Grant Program to disperse these grants to as many institutions and applicants as possible. Furthermore, because grants are funded in order of ranking, and because the MAS intends to disperse as much money from its grants pool as possible, grants requesting smaller dollar amounts may have a better chance of being funded than larger grants. Awards will be made to the grant office or office of sponsored programs for disbursement of funds through the normal channels for extramural funding at each institution. No indirect costs (IDC) will be paid as part of this program.

All undergraduate and graduate students involved in scientific research at the institutions listed in the previous section are eligible.  Students need not be members of MAS.

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2019 Awards and Grants from the BYU Charles Redd Center for Western Studies
Brigham Young University

Application due: Mar. 15, 2019

The Charles Redd Center for Western Studies is pleased to announce multiple awards for 2019 that are available for scholars, students, or organizations conducting research or producing public programming related to Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, or Wyoming.

The Redd Center offers the following funding opportunities:

  • Faculty Research Awards funded by the John Topham and Susan Redd Butler Research Endowment provide up to $3,000 to faculty members at any academic institution to conduct research on any topic related to Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, or Wyoming.
  • Independent Research and Creative Awards provide up to $1,500 to researchers who are not connected to an academic institution for studying Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, or Wyoming. Both new and on-going projects are eligible.
  • Summer Awards for Upper Division and Graduate Students at any academic institution provide up to $1,500 for research support for any topic related to Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, or Wyoming. Research may be conducted at any location.
  • The Annaley Naegle Redd Student Award in Women's History provides up to $1,500 for research support concerning any aspect of women's history in the American West (not limited to the Intermountain West). Applications not receiving the Redd Award but dealing with Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, or Wyoming will be considered for the Summer Awards for Upper Division and Graduate Student Awards.
  • Public Programming Awards provide up to $3,000 to any private or public organization planning a conference, museum exhibit, lecture series or similar public program on a topic related to Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, or Wyoming.
  • Clarence Dixon Taylor Historical Research Awards provide up to $2,500 for completed works from research regarding Central Utah (Utah, Carbon, and Wasatch Counties). Nominations can include theses, books, papers, monographs, articles, symposia, dramatic presentations, lectures, etc. Students and faculty of Brigham Young University or other institutions are eligible, as are other recognized scholars.
  • The Visiting Scholar Program enables university faculty of all ranks, independent scholars, freelance authors and other public intellectuals to conduct research and write at the Redd Center. It provides a stipend of $2,500 per month for two to four months, office facilities, a networked computer, a research assistant, a limited photocopying budget, and campus library and activity privileges.
  • Publication Grants to Presses provide up to $3,000 to assist in the publication of scholarly studies on Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, or Wyoming. The grants will be given to academic publishers to help offset the costs of publishing books and to lower the books' selling price. At the time of application, the book should already have been accepted for publication by the press.

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Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
National Endowment for the Humanities

Application due: Mar. 26, 2019

The Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities (IATDH) program supports national or regional (multi-state) training programs for scholars, humanities professionals, and advanced graduate students to broaden and extend their knowledge of digital humanities. Through this program NEH seeks to increase the number of humanities scholars and practitioners using digital technology in their research and to broadly disseminate knowledge about advanced technology tools and methodologies relevant to the humanities.

Applicants may apply to create institutes that are a single opportunity or are offered multiple times to different audiences. Institutes may be as short as a few days and held at multiple locations or up to six weeks at a single site; virtual institutes are also permissible. Training opportunities could be offered before or after regularly occurring scholarly meetings, during the summer months, or during appropriate times of the academic year. The duration of a program should allow for full and thorough treatment of the topic; it should also be appropriate for the intended audience. These professional development programs may focus on a specific computational method, such as network or spatial analysis. They may also target the needs of a specific humanities discipline or audience.

Today, digital resources and other complex data--their form, manipulation, and interpretation--are as important to humanities study as more traditional research materials. Datasets, for example, may represent digitized historical records, high-quality image data, or even multimedia collections, all of which are increasing in number due to the availability and affordability of mass data storage devices and international initiatives to create digital content. Moreover, extensive networking capabilities, sophisticated analytical tools, and new collaboration platforms are simultaneously providing and improving interactive access to and analysis of the data as well as a multitude of other resources.

With advances like these in mind, the IATDH program aims:

  • to bring together humanities scholars and digital technology specialists from different disciplines to share ideas and methods that advance humanities research and teaching by using digital technologies;

  • to encourage reflection on, and the interpretation and analysis of, new digital media, multimedia, and text-based computing technologies, as well as the integration of these into humanities scholarship and teaching;

  • to build inclusive communities of inquiry and contribute to the intellectual vitality and professional development of participants;

  • to teach current and future generations of humanities scholars to design, develop, and use digital tools and environments for scholarship; and

  • to devise new and creative uses for technology that offer valuable models that can be applied specifically to research in the humanities and to allow those methodologies and approaches to be shared with humanities scholars and teachers.

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Department of Defense (DOD)

Advance Notice of Solicitation: DOD To Award More Than $100M to Establish an Integrated Photonics Manufacturing Institute
Department of Defense

Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) is anticipated to be released in early November 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

In celebration of National Manufacturing Day, the Obama Administration announced it will release a new competition to award more than $100 million to launch a new Institute for Manufacturing Innovation (IMI) focused on Integrated Photonics. The proposed Integrated Photonics Institute will assist in developing an end-to-end photonics 'ecosystem' in the U.S. and support research and development efforts across the country on domestic foundry access, integrated design tools, automated packaging, assembly and test, and workforce development in the research area related to photonics. Administered by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), the formal request for proposal (RFP) should be released in early November.

Click the related link to read more. 

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CDMRP Funding Opportunities
Department of Defense

Deadlines vary per program

SYNOPSIS: 

All pre-applications must be submitted electronically to the CDMRP eReceipt System https://ebrap.org. Full applications must be submitted electronically to the Grants.gov website http://grants.gov.

Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Breast Cancer Research Program

Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Clinical and Rehabilitative Medicine Research Program

Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Gulf War Illness Research Program

Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Orthotics and Prosthetics Outcomes Research Program

Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Peer Reviewed Alzheimer's Research Program

Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Psychological Health/Traumatic Brain Injury (PH/TBI) Research Program

 

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Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program (CDMRP) Bone Marrow Failure Research Program (BMFRP)

Pre-application Deadline: May 13, 2014 5 p.m., EST
Full Proposal Deadline - by invititation only

 

Applications to the Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Bone Marrow Failure Research Program (BMFRP) are being solicited for the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, Defense Health Program (DHP), by the U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisitions Activity (USAMRAA). The BMFRP was established in FY08 to promote innovative research focused on BMF. Appropriations for the BMFRP from FY08 through FY13 totaled $20.15 million (M). The FY14 appropriation is $3.2M.

 

The vision of the BMFRP is to understand and cure BMF diseases. Toward that end, the program challenges the scientific community to design innovative research approaches based on sound scientific evidence that will advance the understanding of inherited and acquired BMF diseases to improve the health of individuals, with the ultimate goals of prevention and cure.

 

FY14 BMFRP Objective: The objective of the FY14 BMFRP is to fund scientifically meritorious research focused on BMF diseases and their long-term sequelae. Investigator-initiated research is encouraged in the areas of congenital or acquired BMF. Studies focused on BMF diseases and their progression to other malignancies such as leukemia are acceptable. However, research primarily focused on myeloproliferative neoplasms, leukemia, or other malignancies is discouraged. Projects including bone marrow transplantation or stem cell biology should address issues unique to BMF diseases.

 

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Department of Defense / CDMRP
Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs

Deadlines: see program pre-announcements

The Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Defense Appropriations Act provides research funding for the peer reviewed programs managed by the Department of Defense (DOD) office of Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP).

This e-mail is to notify the research community of the recently released funding opportunities from the following programs: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Research Program (DMDRP), Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP), Neurofibromatosis Research Program (NFRP), Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP).

Detailed descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, evaluation criteria, and submission requirements can be found in the respective Program Announcements. Each Program Announcement is available electronically for downloading from the Grants.gov website (http://www.grants.gov), the CDMRP website (http://cdmrp.army.mil/funding/prgdefault.shtml) and the electronic Biomedical Research Application Portal (eBRAP) (https://eBRAP.org).

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Research Program (DMDRP)

Investigator-Initiated Research Award

Therapeutic Idea Award

Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP)

Concept Award

Neurofibromatosis Research Program (NFRP)

Clinical Trial Award

Exploration-Hypothesis Development Award

Investigator-Initiated Research Award

New Investigator Award

Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP)

Exploration Hypothesis Development Award

Idea Development Award

Pilot Clinical Trial Award

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Bone Marrow Failure Research Program (BMFRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Multiple Sclerosis Research Program (MSRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program (PRCRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program (PRMRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Epilepsy Research Program (ERP)
Department of Defense

Letter of Intent due: Sept. 21, 2017
Full Application due: Oct. 5, 2017

The FY17 Epilepsy Research Program (ERP) includes the following two awards:

  • Idea Development Award
  • Epilepsy Risk Factors Award

Click on the link below for details about each award.

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Pre-Announcement / Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP): Era of Hope Scholar Award, Innovator Award and Breakthrough Award
Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP)

Deadline: see program URL

The BCRP is providing the information in this pre-announcement to allow investigators time to plan and develop applications. FY14 BCRP Program Announcements and General Application Instructions are anticipated to be posted on Grants.gov in late March 2014. Pre-application and application deadlines will be available when the Program Announcements are released. This pre-announcement should not be construed as an obligation by the government.

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Joint Warfighter Medical Research Program (JWMRP)
Department of Defense

Agency Letter of Interest due: Feb. 1, 2019
Full Application due (by invitation only): TBA

The Joint Warfighter Medical Research Program (JWMRP) provides an opportunity to advance previously funded DoD or Service medical R&D projects that address the medical requirements of the Services. The JWMRP complements and enhances the Defense Health Program by facilitating the further development of promising industry and academic efforts.

Each year a broad spectrum of R&D initiatives are considered under the JWMRP. The science and technology development efforts are aligned to one of the six Joint Program Committee (JPC) scientific domains. These are: Medical Simulation and Information Sciences (JPC-1), Military Infectious Diseases (JPC-2), Military Operational Medicine (JPC-5), Combat Casualty Care (JPC-6), Radiation Health Effects (JPC-7), and Clinical and Rehabilitative Medicine (JPC-8).

Through research efforts focused in advanced technology development and product demonstration and validation, the JWMRP offers a pathway to transition maturing medical solutions to the Military Health System (MHS) for the benefit of our Service members and other MHS beneficiaries. In accordance with the Congressional language, the funds appropriated for the JWMRP shall be used to augment and accelerate high priority DoD and Service medical requirements and to continue prior year initiatives that are close to achieving their objectives and yield a benefit to military medicine. These funds shall not be used for new projects or for basic research.

Please Note: This Request for Information (RFI) is issued solely for information and planning purposes and does not constitute a solicitation. Neither unsolicited proposals nor any other kind of offers will be considered in response to this RFI. Responses to this notice are not offers and will not be accepted by the Government to form a binding contract. Responders are solely responsible for all expenses associated with responding to this RFI. All information received in response to this RFI that is marked Proprietary will be handled accordingly. Responses to the RFI will not be returned. At this time, questions concerning the composition and requirements for a future RFP will not be entertained.

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Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (Pre-Announcement)
Department of Defense

Application due: TBA

The FY19 Defense Appropriation provides $6 million to the Department of Defense Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP) to support innovative, high-impact TSC research.

TSCRP is providing the information in this pre-announcement to allow investigators time to plan and develop applications. FY19 TSCRP Program Announcements and General Application Instructions for the following award mechanisms are anticipated to be posted on the Grants.gov website in February 2019. Pre-application and application deadlines will be available when the Program Announcements are released. This pre-announcement should not be construed as an obligation by the government.

Focus Areas: The goal of the FY19 TSCRP is to fund exploratory, pioneering, and transformative science that promotes discoveries in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), from mechanistic insights to clinical application, by supporting new ideas and investigators for the benefit of Service members, their beneficiaries, and the American public. Within this context, the FY19 TSCRP encourages applications that address the critical needs of the TSC community in one or more of the following FY19 Focus Areas:

  • Eradicating tumors associated with TSC and TSC-associated lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), including gaining a deeper mechanistic understanding of TSC signaling pathways
  • Preventing epilepsy, improving treatment, and mitigating comorbidities associated with TSC-related seizures
  • Understanding the features of TSC-Associated Neuropsychiatric Disorders (TAND) and reducing their impact through pharmacological or nonpharmacological interventions
  • Advancing clinical trial readiness through development of biomarkers, clinical endpoints, clinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD), patient selection and sample size determination, novel drug delivery, and treatment optimization

The TSCRP includes the following award mechanisms: Exploration-Hypothesis Development Award; Idea Development Award; and Clinical Translational Research Award.

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Research of Technologies Advancing Corrosion Prevention and Control
Department of Defense

Agency White Paper due: Feb. 19, 2019
Full Proposal due (by invitation only): 30 days post-invitation

The U.S. Air Force Academy, Center for Aircraft Structural Life Extension (CAStLE), performs a range of structural integrity research tasks in support of multiple Government, academic, and commercial sponsors. Among these pursuits, CAStLE engages in a wide range of corrosion engineering and material science research efforts, with more emphasis on applied research, and that part of development not related to a specific system or hardware procurement.

Current CAStLE research strengths include: high temperature materials development; advanced barrier coatings; static strength, static stability design, corrosion modeling, prevention and control; validation testing, analysis and methods development; computational structural and fracture mechanics; failure analysis, flight data acquisition system development, installation, maintenance and data analysis; structural risk analysis, and support of the USAF Aircraft Structural Integrity Program (ASIP).

The interaction between corrosion and cracking damage mechanisms and their effect on the structural integrity has been a long-standing interest of CAStLE. There is Department of Defense (DoD) level interest in material degradation in structures--to include corrosion, cracking and other service-related damage mechanisms. The DoD level material degradation interest is the subject of this CALL, while also serving a dual public purpose.

This call for White Papers is focused on fundamental research that can lead to the future development of capabilities to prevent and control corrosion and degradation of materials and the structures of systems and facilities. The goal of these capabilities is reducing costs, improving availability of systems, and increasing the safety of military assets, which serve a dual interest in public structures and facilities. Projects must be new research efforts. Proposals for the continuation of existing research projects funded under previous grant or cooperative agreement awards are not desired. Collaboration among proposing institutions is strongly encouraged.

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Webinar Series: Research and Career Development
Department of Defense

Webinar Dates: Feb.11 - May 6, 2019

The Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP), Department of Defense, presents a webinar series on types of funding opportunities offered and strategies to increase the success of applications submitted to different CDMRP programs.

The first of these webinars scheduled is titled Funding Opportunities and Strategies for Success and will be posted on the CDMRP website. Viewers will learn how to find the latest CDMRP funding opportunities, how to navigate a program announcement (funding opportunity announcement) and use what they learn to create a competitive application. In addition, the webinar will introduce the two-tiered application review process, outline strategies for success, and review pitfalls in grant preparation.

Future webinars will include information on funding opportunities focused on such topics as innovative studies, career development, team science, clinical trials and more.

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AFRL/RXM Manufacturing Technology Open BAA
Department of the Air Force

Whitepaper request
Open until June 2019

A -- AFRL/RXM MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY OPEN BAA - BROAD AGENCY ANNOUNCEMENT (BAA)   SOL BAA-RQKM-2014-0020 POC P. S. Strader, Phone: (937) 713-9895 WE: FBO.gov Permalink https://www.fbo.gov/spg/USAF/AFMC/AFRLWRS/BAA-RQKM-2014-0020/listing.html E-MAIL: pamela.strader@us.af.mil pamela.strader@us.af.mil NAICS: 541712 Contract Data Requirements List (CDRLs) BAA Initial Announcement Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials & Manufacturing Directorate is soliciting whitepapers and potentially technical and cost proposals under this announcement that supports the needs of its Manufacturing and Technology mission. Manufacturing Technologies that focus on strengthening defense manufacturing capabilities and efficiencies and transitioning capability to the factory floor are of interest. Descriptors of Manufacturing Technology interests are presented in two contexts; that of manufacturing technology competencies and that of Air Force application area needs. See BAA for more detailed description. CITE: https://www.fbo.gov/?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=94e2504d133d6f61e67974ab3de4937d&tab=core&_cview=0 Posted 06/24/14 (W-SN03404922). (0175)

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Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP)
Department of Defense

Pre-Application due: Varies by award (Mar. 12 or 14, 2019)
Full Application due: Varies by award (Mar. 28 or June 13, 2019)

The Department of Defense FY19 Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) includes the following award mechanisms:

  • Breakthrough Award Levels 1 and 2
  • Breakthrough Award Level 3
  • Breakthrough Award Level 4
  • Era of Hope Scholar Award
  • Innovator Award
  • Distinguished Investigator Award
  • Breakthrough Fellowship Award

Click on the program link below to access program announcement and application instructions for each award mechanism.

View Program URL


Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program (PRMRP)
Department of Defense

Pre-Application due: Varies by award (Mar. 14 or Mar. 28, 2019)
Full Application due: Varies by award (Apr. 11, July 2, or July 11, 2019)

The Department of Defense FY19 Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program (PRMRP) includes the following award mechanisms:

  • Discovery Award
  • Focused Program Award
  • Investigator-Initiated Research Award
  • Technology/Therapeutic Development Award

Click on the program link below for program announcement and application instructions for each award mechanism.

View Program URL


Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Research Program: Therapeutic Development Award
Department of Defense

Pre-Application due: Mar. 22, 2019
Full Application due (by invitation only): July 25, 2019

The Therapeutic Development Award supports research ranging from validation of therapeutic leads through U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Investigational New Drug (IND)-enabling studies. The proposed studies are expected to be empirical in nature and product-driven. Applicants with limited ALS experience are strongly encouraged to collaborate with those having substantial expertise in ALS research and/or ALS model systems.

Examples of activities that will be supported by this award include:

  • Confirmation of candidate therapeutics obtained from screening or by other means, including optimization of potency and pharmacological properties and testing of derivatives and sister compounds

  • Validation of early pilot studies, including the use of multiple ALS model systems and/or replicating preliminary data with more time points or additional doses

  • Studies on formulation and stability leading to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) production methods

  • IND-enabling studies, to include compound characterization, absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) studies, and dose/response and toxicology studies in relevant model systems

Validation of treatment approaches in appropriately powered and controlled studies using biological correlates of disease activity and progression in pre-existing, de-identified human specimens from well-characterized patient cohorts is encouraged. Examples of acceptable cohorts for study include controlled clinical trials, observational studies, and registries (e.g., Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] National ALS Registry and/or Biorepository). Active duty military and/or Veteran patient populations or resources should be considered. All specimens must exist at the time of application submission; collection of new specimens will not be supported.

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Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Research Program: Therapeutic Idea Award
Department of Defense

Pre-Application due: Mar. 22, 2019
Full Application due (by invitation only): July 25, 2019

The Therapeutic Idea Award is designed to promote new ideas aimed at drug or treatment discovery that are still in the early stages of development. Projects that focus primarily on investigating the pathophysiology of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are not within the scope of this Funding Opportunity. Development and/or modification of preclinical model systems or the application of high-throughput screens to define or assess lead compounds for ALS treatment are of interest.

Development of methods to adequately measure target binding and proximal downstream effects (target engagement) and the potential for undesirable activities at related but unintended targets (selectivity) are also encouraged. While the inclusion of preliminary data is not prohibited, the strength of the application should not rely on preliminary data, but on the innovative approach. All proposed research projects should include a well-formulated, testable hypothesis based on strong scientific rationale that holds translational potential to improve ALS treatment and/or advance a novel treatment modality.

Innovation and impact are important aspects of the Therapeutic Idea Award. Research deemed innovative may introduce a new paradigm, challenge current paradigms, introduce novel concepts or technologies, or exhibit other uniquely creative qualities that may lead to potential therapeutics for ALS. Impact may be near-term or long-term but must be significant and move beyond an incremental advancement.

Identification of treatment approaches using biological correlates of disease activity and progression in pre-existing, de-identified human specimens from well-characterized, adequately controlled, and sufficiently powered patient cohorts is encouraged. Examples of acceptable cohorts for study include controlled clinical trials, observational studies, and registries (e.g., Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] National ALS Registry and/or Biorepository). Active duty military and/or Veteran patient populations or resources should be considered. All specimens must exist at the time of application submission; collection of new specimens will not be supported.

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Department of Education

FY 2019 Education Innovation and Research (EIR) Competitions
U.S. Department of Education / Office of Innovation and Improvement

Notice of Intent to Apply due: Feb. 21, 2019
Full Application due: Apr. 2, 2019

The U.S. Department of Education's Education Innovation and Research (EIR) program provides funding to create or take to scale entrepreneurial, evidence-based, field-initiated innovations to improve the achievement and attainment of high-need K-12 students.

Three types of grants are available: Early-phase, Mid-phase, and Expansion. This unique three-tiered grant structure links the amount of funding that an applicant may receive to the quality of evidence that supports the efficacy of the proposed project. $125 million is available for awards, and 25 percent of these funds will be reserved for rural applicants serving predominantly rural students. In addition, EIR aims to award at least $60 million for STEM education projects. In both cases, this funding will be contingent upon the receipt of an adequate number of applications of sufficient quality.

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Department of Energy (DOE)

Innovative Development in Energy-Related Applied Science (IDEAS) (DE-FOA-0001002)
Department of Energy

LOI due on September 28, 2014
Full submission due dates are TBD

SYNOPSIS: 

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) provides a continuing opportunity for the rapid support of early-stage applied research to explore innovative new concepts with the potential for transformational and disruptive changes in energy technology. IDEAS awards are intended to be flexible and may take the form of analyses or exploratory research that provides the agency with information useful for the subsequent development of focused technology programs. IDEAS awards may also support research to support proof-of-concept projects for a unique technology concept, either in an area not currently supported by the agency or as a potential enhancement to an ongoing focused technology program. This announcement is purposely broad in scope to encourage the submission of the most innovative, out-of-the-box ideas in energy technology.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

ARPA-E (Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy) seeks transformative ideas that enable most efficient, economical, sustainable, and environmentally benign conversion of energy while minimizing energy destruction. The broad objective of this FOA is to identify disruptive concepts in energy-related technologies that challenge the status quo and represent a leap beyond today's technology. An innovative concept alone is not enough; the idea must also have the potential to be impactful--meaning that, if successful, it represents a fundamentally new paradigm in energy technology with the potential to make a significant impact on ARPA-E's Mission Areas. Concepts of particular interest have the potential to achieve percentage-level reductions in U.S. energy consumption, energy-related imports, or greenhouse gas emissions.

Applicants may propose any idea that addresses an ARPA-E Mission Area and falls within one or more Areas of Interest selected from the six forms of energy involved in the conversion or interaction of energy. The six forms of energy are Mechanical, Thermal, Chemical, Electrical, Radiant, and Nuclear energy.

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Collaborative Fusion Energy Research in the DIII-D National Program
Department of Energy

Pre-Application due: Jan. 15, 2019
Full Application due: Mar. 5, 2019

The Department of Energy Office of Science program in Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) announced its interest in receiving grant applications for collaborative research in fusion energy science as part of the DIII-D national research program. The mission of the DIII-D program is to establish the scientific basis for the optimization of the tokamak approach to fusion energy production. The primary means to accomplish this mission is research utilizing the DIII-D tokamak to develop the ultimate potential of the tokamak concept as a magnetic confinement system. The DIII-D program also involves foundational fusion energy science research to make progress on a broad front toward predictive understanding of fusion plasmas. The major strengths of the program are the highly flexible and well-diagnosed DIII-D tokamak and a large collaborative integrated research team from the national and international fusion community.

The DIII-D program helps to build the scientific foundations for fusion energy by contributing to the fundamental understanding of magnetically confined plasmas, and assessing the attractiveness of the advanced tokamak (AT) concept for future fusion applications. The program emphasizes research that aims to prepare the U.S. program for burning plasma operation in ITER, develop the physics basis for high performance, steady-state operation, and develop boundary solutions for future fusion devices. The flexibility and capabilities of the DIII-D actuator and diagnostic set enable a wide range of experiment/theory comparisons that advance the forefront of scientific understanding in these key research areas. Applications for collaborative research must target DIII-D program elements aligned with developing: 1) the scientific basis for the burning plasma core, which includes transient control, research enabling Q=10 on ITER and the path to steady state; and 2) the scientific basis for boundary solutions, which includes detachment control, divertor optimization and investigation of new reactor-relevant wall materials.

The DIII-D program is highly collaborative in nature, where participating scientists provide support to the entire research team in order to deliver all the elements needed for a scientific study on DIII-D (e.g., operating diagnostic systems, providing analyzed data, and supporting facility operations where appropriate). Each DIII-D research study typically will require the engagement and support of a large group of scientists to plan and conduct the experiments, and to collect and analyze the resulting data. Therefore, applicants are encouraged to highlight specific contributions and methodologies that will provide benefit to the wider research program and discuss support that will be provided to (and/or needed from) the DIII-D research team as a whole in order as an effective part of the experimental program.

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Atmospheric System Research (ASR)
Department of Energy

Pre-Application due: Jan. 28, 2019
Full Application due (by invitation only): Mar. 14, 2019

The Atmospheric System Research (ASR) program, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), supports research on key cloud, aerosol, precipitation, and radiative transfer processes that affect the Earth's radiative balance and hydrological cycle, especially processes that limit the predictive ability of regional and global models. ASR announces its interest in research grant applications for observational, data analysis, and/or modeling studies that use observations supported by the Climate and Environmental Sciences Division, including the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) scientific user facility and the ASR program to improve understanding and model representation of aerosol processes at ARM sites; warm boundary-layer processes; convective cloud processes; and Southern Ocean cloud and aerosol processes.

The goal of ASR is to quantify the interactions among aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and radiation to improve understanding of key cloud, aerosol, precipitation, and radiation processes that affect the Earth's radiative balance and hydrological cycle, especially processes that limit the predictive ability of regional and global models. For the most part, ASR investments use ARM's measurements of radiation, aerosols, clouds, precipitation, thermodynamics, turbulence, and state variables. ARM's continuous observational datasets are supplemented with process models, laboratory studies, and shorter-duration ground-based and airborne field campaigns to target specific atmospheric processes in different locations and across a range of spatial and temporal scales.

ASR's four priority research areas correspond to atmospheric regimes with large uncertainties in earth system prediction:

  • aerosol processes;

  • warm boundary-layer processes;

  • convective processes; and

  • high-latitude processes.

Specific topics solicited in ASR funding opportunity announcements vary from year to year to take advantage of new ARM data, respond to ASR-relevant workshop reports, and maintain a balanced research portfolio. Not all ASR priority research areas will be solicited every year.

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Theoretical Research in Magnetic Fusion Energy Science
Department of Energy

Agency LOI due: Feb. 11, 2019
Full Application due: Mar. 26, 2019

The Department of Energy Office of Science program in Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) hereby announces its interest in receiving new or renewal grant applications for fundamental theoretical and computational research for public benefit, relevant to magnetic confinement configurations.

The specific areas of interest of this FOA are:

  1. Macroscopic Stability

  2. Confinement and Transport

  3. Boundary Physics

  4. Plasma Heating & Non-Inductive Current Drive

  5. Energetic Particles

The Magnetic Fusion Energy Science (MFES) theory program focuses on advancing the scientific understanding of the fundamental physical processes governing the behavior of magnetically confined plasmas. An important objective of the MFES theory program is to develop the predictive capability needed for a sustainable fusion energy source. The early-stage research supported by this FOA has the potential of creating significant public good by contributing to American energy dominance.

The efforts supported by this program range from analytical work to the development and application of simulation codes capable of exploiting the potential of next generation high performance computers. In addition to its scientific discovery mission, the MFES theory program provides the scientific grounding for the physics models implemented in the advanced simulation codes developed under the FES Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing portfolio.

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Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (DOE EPSCoR) Implementation Grants
Department of Energy

Pre-Application due: Dec. 20, 2018
Full Application due (by invitation only): Mar. 27, 2019

The U.S. Department of Energy's Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (DOE EPSCoR) is a federal-state partnership program designed to:

  • Enhance the capabilities of designated jurisdictions to conduct sustainable and nationally competitive energy-related research through increased human and technical resources, including training of scientists and engineers.

  • Advance DOE's overarching mission by supporting early stage research and development for a wide range of topical areas across the Department: 1) Office of Science: Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Basic Energy Sciences, Biological and Environmental Research, Fusion Energy Sciences, High Energy Physics, and Nuclear Physics; and 2) Technology Offices: Electricity, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Environmental Management, Fossil Energy, Nuclear Energy, and the National Nuclear Security Administration.

The objectives of the DOE EPSCoR Implementation Grants are to:

  • Jumpstart capability development in the jurisdiction(s) through increased human and technical resources.

  • Support a group of researchers working on a common scientific theme, with mutually supporting goals and objectives.

  • When topically relevant to the subject matter of the application, promote collaborations with other institutions of higher education and industry with strong participation by students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty from EPSCoR eligible institutions. These collaborations may include institutions from other EPSCoR jurisdictions. Collaborations involving more than one institution or more than one EPSCoR jurisdiction, while welcome, are not a requirement.

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Terrestrial Ecosystem Science
Department of Energy

Pre-Application due: Jan. 24, 2019
Full Application due (by invitation only): Mar. 29, 2019

The Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) program in the Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), announces its interest in receiving research applications seeking to improve the understanding and representation of terrestrial ecosystems in ways that advance Earth system model parameterizations and capabilities. This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) will consider applications that utilize and couple measurements, experiments, modeling and/or synthesis of terrestrial ecosystems across a continuum from the subsurface to the top of the vegetated canopy and from molecular to global scales.

The goal of this FOA is to improve the representation of coupled terrestrial ecosystem processes, with a view towards advancing the sophistication and accuracy of Earth system models, thereby improving the quality of Earth, ecosystem, and environmental model projections and providing the scientific foundation needed to support DOE's science and energy missions. Applications to this FOA should take a systems approach to understand ecosystems over the multiple temporal and spatial scales represented in models (e.g., single process models, ecosystem models, regional models, and global models such as DOE's Energy Exascale Earth System Model).

This emphasis on the capture of advanced empirical and theoretical understanding through models has two goals: 1) the improved the representation of integrated processes in coupled models, thereby increasing the sophistication of the projections; and 2) the encouragement for the community to understand and use a diversity of existing models and to compare model results against observations or other data sets to identify knowledge gaps and future research directions. It also seeks to encourage an iterative dialog between the experimental and modeling research communities such that a) experimental research objectives are cooperatively designed to address key model deficiencies; and b) the modeling efforts are designed to inform the experimental/empirical research.

By connecting the modeling and experimental components, this approach maximizes the return on scientific investments by reduced duplication of efforts, encouraging collaboration, and accelerating the adoption of scientific findings into improve predictive capabilities. This approach provides a significant public benefit to both DOE and the scientific community.

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Subsurface Biogeochemical Research
Department of Energy

Pre-Application due: Feb. 14, 2019
Application due (by invitation only): Apr. 11, 2019

The Department of Energy Office of Science program in Biological and Environmental Research announces its interest in receiving applications for research in Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR). The goal of the SBR program is to advance a robust predictive understanding of how watersheds function as integrated hydro-biogeochemical systems and how these systems respond to perturbations caused by changes in water availability and quality, contaminant release, nutrient cycling, land-use, vegetation cover, and snowmelt timing.

This FOA will consider Standard and Exploratory applications (defined in the full announcement) that focus on measurements, experiments, and modeling to provide improved quantitative and predictive understanding of how hydro-biogeochemical processes function in watershed systems. SBR is seeking research applications on topics in the following areas: a) Ecohydrology and Hydro-biogeochemistry; and b) Geochemistry and Biogeochemistry.

Applicants should familiarize themselves with the SBR Science Focus Area (SFA) programs at the DOE National Laboratories (https://doesbr.org/research/sfa/). All projects are required to clearly delineate an integrative, hypothesis-driven approach and clearly describe the existing needs and gaps in state-of-the-art models.

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Early Career Research Program
Department of Energy

Pre-Application due: Feb. 6, 2019
Full Application due (by invitation only): Apr. 29, 2019

The mission of the Office of Science (SC), Department of Energy, is to deliver the scientific discoveries and major scientific tools to transform our understanding of nature and advance the energy, economic, and national security of the United States. SC is the Nation's largest Federal sponsor of basic research in the physical sciences and the lead Federal agency supporting fundamental scientific research for our Nation's energy future.

SC hereby invites grant applications for support under the Early Career Research Program in the following program areas: Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR); Biological and Environmental Research (BER); Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES); High Energy Physics (HEP), and Nuclear Physics (NP). The purpose of this program is to support the development of individual research programs of outstanding scientists early in their careers and to stimulate research careers in the areas supported by SC.

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New Bioimaging Approaches for Bioenergy
Department of Energy

Pre-Application due: Apr. 4, 2019
Full Application due (by invitation only): May 20, 2019

The Department of Energy Office of Science hereby announces its interest in receiving applications to support fundamental research towards enabling new bioimaging approaches to achieve an advanced understanding of plant and microbial systems relevant to bioenergy research.

New quantum dot-based imaging approaches including quantum probes and sensors, and complementary optical imaging instrumentation, are needed to allow the observation and characterization of multiple complex biological processes occurring within living plant and microbial systems, including rhizosphere and soil microbiomes. Processes of interest include, but are not limited to, measuring enzyme function within cells, tracking metabolic pathways in vivo, monitoring the transport of materials within cells or across cellular membranes, monitoring signaling processes between cells within plant-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions.

Development of probes and sensors with desirable optical properties functionalized with specific biologically active molecules to interact and bind with specific cellular targets of interest are encouraged. Proposed approaches should enable dynamic localization and imaging to facilitate testing and validation of hypothesized cellular processes. It is expected that applications will make use of quantum-dot enabled approaches for imaging of biological targets non-destructively and in real time, to dramatically enhance our ability to measure biological processes in and among living cells.

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Department of Health & Human Services

Research Grants for Preventing Violence and Violence Related Injury (R01)
Department of Health and Human Services

Agency LOI due: Jan. 28, 2019
Application due: Mar. 8, 2019

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) is soliciting investigator-initiated research that will help expand and advance our understanding about what works to prevent violence that impacts children and youth, collectively referred to as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), including child abuse and neglect, teen dating violence, sexual violence, youth violence, youth/parent suicidal behavior, and exposure to adult intimate partner violence.

This initiative is intended to support the evaluation of primary prevention programs, practices or policies that target universal or selected high-risk populations (i.e., populations that have one or more risk factors that place them at heightened risk for violence). Funds are available to conduct such studies focused on preventing child abuse and neglect and at least one other form of violence affecting children and youth, including teen dating violence, sexual violence, youth violence, youth/parent suicidal behavior, and exposure to adult intimate partner violence.

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Department of Justice (DOJ)

OVW Grants to Reduce Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking on Campus Program
Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) / U.S. Department of Justice

Application due: Mar. 14, 2019

The OVW Grants to Reduce Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking on Campus Program encourages a comprehensive coordinated community approach that enhances victim safety, provides services and support for victims, and supports efforts to hold offenders accountable. The funding supports activities that develop and strengthen trauma-informed victim services and strategies to prevent, investigate, and respond to sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking on campus.

Funds under this program must be used for one or more of the following purposes:

  1. To provide personnel, training, technical assistance, data collection, and other equipment with respect to the increased apprehension, investigation, and adjudication of persons committing domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking on campus.

  2. To develop, strengthen, and implement campus policies, protocols, and services that more effectively identify and respond to the crimes of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking, including the use of technology to commit these crimes, and to train campus administrators, campus security personnel, and personnel serving on campus disciplinary or judicial boards on such policies, protocols, and services.

  3. To implement and operate education programs for the prevention of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

  4. To develop, enlarge, or strengthen victim services programs and population specific services on the campuses of the institutions involved, including programs providing legal, medical, or psychological counseling for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; and to improve delivery of victim assistance on campus.

  5. To create, disseminate, or otherwise provide assistance and information about victims' options on and off campus to bring disciplinary or other legal action, including assistance to victims in immigration matters.

  6. To develop, install, or expand data collection and communication systems, including computerized systems, linking campus security to the local law enforcement for the purpose of identifying and tracking arrests, protection orders, violations of protection orders, prosecutions, and convictions with respect to the crimes of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking on campus.

  7. To provide capital improvements (including improved lighting and communications facilities but not including the construction of buildings) on campuses to address the crimes of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

  8. To support improved coordination among campus administrators, campus security personnel, and local law enforcement to reduce domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking on campus.

  9. To develop or adapt and provide developmental, culturally appropriate, and linguistically accessible print or electronic materials to address both prevention and intervention in domestic violence, dating violence, sexual violence, and stalking.

  10. To develop or adapt population specific strategies and projects for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking from underserved populations on campus.

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Research and Development in Forensic Science for Criminal Justice Purposes
U.S. Department of Justice

Application due: Apr. 11, 2019

With this solicitation, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) seeks proposals for basic or applied research and development projects. An NIJ forensic science research and development grant supports a discrete, specified, circumscribed project that will: 1) increase the body of knowledge to guide and inform forensic science policy and practice; or 2) lead to the production of useful material(s), device(s), system(s), or method(s) that have the potential for forensic application.

The intent of this program is to direct the findings of basic scientific research; foster research and development in broader scientific fields applicable to forensic science; and support ongoing forensic science research toward the development of highly-discriminating, accurate, reliable, cost-effective, and rapid methods for the identification, analysis, and interpretation of physical evidence for criminal justice purposes.

Projects should address the challenges and needs of the forensic science community, including, but not limited to, the operational needs discussed at NIJ FY19 Forensic Science TWG Meeting (information at NIJ.gov). While the goals and deliverables of proposed projects are not required to result in immediate solutions to the posted challenges and needs, proposals should at a minimum address the foundational work that will lead to eventual solutions.

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Foundations

Changes in Health Care Financing and Organization
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

Changes in Health Care Financing and Organization (HCFO) supports research, policy analysis and evaluation projects that provide policy leaders timely information on health care policy, financing and organization issues. Supported projects include:

  • examining significant issues and interventions related to health care financing and organization and their effects on health care costs, quality and access; and
  • exploring or testing major new ways to finance and organize health care that have the potential to improve access to more affordable and higher quality health services.

Researchers, as well as practitioners and public and private policy-makers working with researchers, are eligible to submit proposals through their organizations. Projects may be initiated from within many disciplines, including health services research, economics, sociology, political science, public policy, public health, public administration, law and business administration. RWJF encourages proposals from organizations on behalf of researchers who are just beginning their careers, who can serve either individually as principal investigators or as part of a project team comprising researchers or other collaborators with more experience.

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Education Reform - Shape Public Policy
Walton Family Foundation, Inc

LOI's accepted in an ongoing basis
Full submissions are by invitation only

SYNOPSIS:

The Walton Family Foundation seeks to build the capacity of organizations to help enact, strengthen and protect programs that empower parents to choose high-performing schools. The idea being that when all families are empowered to choose from among several quality school options, all schools will be fully motivated to provide the best possible education. Better school performance leads, in turn, to higher student achievement, lower dropout rates and greater numbers of students entering and completing college.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Foundation's Shape Public Policy initiative, focuses on advocacy groups promoting: Public charter school choice; Private school choice; District reforms, particularly open enrollment and district school choice; and, Cross-sector parental choice, parents are empowered to choose across school sectors. The need to continue improving the public policy environment is central to this education reform strategy.

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Environment Program
The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

All organizations interested in applying for a grant from the Environment Program should read the Environment Program homepage. Depending on the nature of your organization's work, you may also want to read the Western Conservation page and the Western Conservation grant guidelines; the Energy and Climate page and Energy and Climate grant guidelines; and the Serving Bay Area Communities page before submitting a Letter of Inquiry. 

Our Approach

  • The vast majority of the grants we make are to organizations that work on policy development and advocacy because we think policy change provides the greatest opportunity to reach our goals.
  • We pursue our strategies with a focus on engaging the people and organizations most needed to achieve our goals. An important aspect of this approach is building a broad base of support among those not traditionally involved in environmental protection.
  • We are outcome focused and whenever possible use quantitative metrics to track progress toward goals.
  • Our Western Conservation grantmaking embraces the region west of the Rocky Mountains in the United States and Canada, and includes Alaska, but not Hawaii.
  • Our Energy and Climate grantmaking is global.
  • Our grants for clean transportation mainly support work in China, Mexico, Brazil, and the United States.
  • We fund the vast majority of our Energy and Climate grants though large grants to organizations like the ClimateWorks Foundation and the Energy Foundation, which in turn make smaller grants to a variety of organizations.
  • When there is a high degree of alignment between our goals and those of a grantee, we often will provide general operating support rather than project support.
  • In some cases, we provide support to develop the organizational health and efficiency of our grantees.
  • Our Serving Bay Area Communities grantmaking funds efforts to improve outdoor recreational opportunities, urban parks, and access to transit in the San Francisco Bay Area and to minimize environmental threats in the region's disadvantaged communities.

If you think your project or organization fits within our guidelines, you are invited to submit a Letter of Inquiry for our Western Conservation, Energy and Climate, or Serving Bay Area Communities grantmaking. Please use the online Letter of Inquiry. Letters of Inquiry are accepted at any time. Do not submit full proposals until invited to do so; uninvited proposals will not be read.

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Grants for Organizations
Ford Foundation

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

For grant-seeking organizations, the Ford Foundation grant making focuses on reducing poverty and injustice; promoting democratic values; and advancing human knowledge, creativity and achievement. If your project reflects these priorities, you may submit a grant inquiry using the online form. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The foundation funds projects under the following focal areas: 

  • Democratic and Accountable Government
  • Economic Fairness 
  • Educational Opportunity and Scholarship
  • Freedom of Expression 
  • Gender, Sexuality and Reproductive Justice
  • Human Rights 
  • Metropolitan Opportunity 
  • Sustainable Development 

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Grants Program
National Endowment for Financial Education

LOI due on December 2, 2014
Full submissions are by invitation only

SYNOPSIS: 

The NEFE grants program seeks innovative research that can make a profound contribution to the field of financial literacy. Inquiries are encouraged from disciplines in fields as diverse as: behavior, economics, neuroscience, sociology, psychology, marketing, finance, education, change theory, and decision sciences and others.

NEFE seeks projects whose outcomes can improve the public's ability to achieve personal and household financial well-being. Of particular interest are pro-active research projects initiated from one of a broad spectrum of scholarly disciplines whose findings may cultivate critical thinking in the financial literacy community. Also of interest are development projects that put research recommendations into action. Project outcomes must be capable of achieving traction and measurable impact with audiences such as financial education intermediaries, researchers, practitioners, decision makers, and others who can achieve effective outreach to a target population with an unmet financial literacy need or to the general public.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Project outcomes should be actionable in the field of financial literacy, directly relevant to the financial well-being of the public, and able to be applied broadly. Funding requests are assessed within the parameters of the following three key grant themes:

1. Understand Financial Behavior: A fundamental element in all projects is the necessity to address optimal financial behaviors. Projects should include outcomes relevant to understanding or improving financial behaviors of specific segments of the American public or the public in general. NEFE encourages inquiry within the physical, social, and psychological sciences to facilitate the public's ability to improve personal financial well-being. Findings must be presented in a manner that engages educators, policy makers, segments of the public, and/or individuals to adopt policies, practices, attitudes, and skills that result in positive public and personal outcomes.

2. Advance Innovative Thinking: NEFE encourages projects that spawn rigorous, proactive research initiated from a broad spectrum of scholarly disciplines where potential findings indicate strong possibilities to advance critical thinking, cultivate vigorous debate, challenge the status quo, and/or illuminate trends likely to affect the personal financial well-being of the American public.

3. Assure Significance to Society: Projects should provide evidence that outcomes are likely to produce practical benefit for primary stakeholders such as financial education intermediaries, researchers, practitioners, decision makers, and/or entities who can achieve effective educational outreach to a population segment with an unmet financial literacy need or the public in general. Consideration is paid to research that pertains to solutions with traction and scale sufficient to make a measurable difference in financial responsibility, stability, and/or well-being.

Research findings are expected to result in actionable recommendations or make a profound and credible contribution to the financial literacy body of knowledge.

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Grants Program
Dell (Susan & Michael) Foundation

There is no deadline for grant applications.

SYNOPSIS: 

The Foundation provides grants focus on education, health and family economic stability -- the factors essential to ensuring that underprivileged children escape poverty to become healthy, productive adults.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The sponsor focuses on urban education, childhood health, and family economic stability.

Urban Education: Education-related grants make up about two-thirds of the sponsor's global giving. The sponsor focuses on improving student performance, ensuring consistent quality of education and increasing access to schools.

Childhood Health: The sponsor's global health portfolio improves access to quality healthcare services, promotes healthy nutrition and lifestyle behaviors among families and children, and fosters world-class applied research.

Family Economic Stability: The sponsor's economic stability portfolio gives families opportunities to improve their socioeconomic status and break the cycle of poverty so their children have a chance at stable, productive lives.

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Grants Program
Spencer (W.L.S.) Foundation

LOI's accepted on a rolling basis
Full submissions by invitation only

SYNOPSIS: 

The Foundation funds initiatives that embrace and encourage creativity and risk taking. The Foundation likes the leverage that arises from seed grants, challenge grants, and matching grants.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The program areas are:

ARTS - The Foundation funds educational activities, publications and outreach associated with innovative art and/or contemporary art exhibitions, especially those focusing on contemporary Asian Art. The Foundation is interested in projects that encourage knowledge about art and culture, foster international understanding, and are supported by academic scholarship.

EDUCATION - The Foundation funds programs that are innovative and that motivate children to stay in school, do well academically, and continue on in their education beyond high school (to college or other higher education opportunities). In this area, the Foundation may continue to fund programs that it believes in, and the Foundation may fund the replication of a successful program in a new site. The Foundation tends to fund programs that are national or regional in nature, but which have a chapter in San Francisco.

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Grants Program
RGK Foundation

LOI's accepted on a rolling basis
Full submissions by invitation only

SYNOPSIS: 

RGK Foundation awards grants in the broad areas of Education, Community, and Health/Medicine. While RGK Foundation has no geographic restrictions, funding is limited to projects conducted within the United States.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Foundation's primary interests within Education include programs that focus on formal K-12 education (particularly mathematics, science and reading), teacher development, literacy, and higher education.

Within Community, the Foundation supports a broad range of human services, community improvement, abuse prevention, and youth development programs. Human service programs of particular interest to the Foundation include children and family services, early childhood development, and parenting education. The Foundation supports a variety of Community Improvement programs including those that enhance non-profit management and promote philanthropy and voluntarism. Youth development programs supported by the Foundation typically include after-school educational enrichment programs that supplement and enhance formal education systems to increase the chances for successful outcomes in school and life. The Foundation is also interested in programs that attract female and minority students into the fields of mathematics, science, and technology.

The Foundation's current interests in the area of Health/Medicine include programs that promote the health and well-being of children, programs that promote access to health services, and Foundation-initiated programs focusing on ALS.

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Grants Program
Hearst Foundations

Proposals are accepted year round

SYNOPSIS: 

The Hearst Foundations support well-established nonprofit organizations that address important issues within its major areas of interests - education, health, culture, and social service - and that primarily serve large demographic and/or geographic constituencies. In each area of funding, the Foundations look to identify those organizations achieving truly differentiated results relative to other organizations making similar efforts for similar populations. The Foundations also look for evidence of sustainability beyond their support.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

CULTURE - The Hearst Foundations fund cultural institutions that offer meaningful programs in the arts and sciences, prioritizing those which enable engagement by young people and create a lasting impression. The Foundations also fund select programs nurturing and developing artistic talent.

EDUCATION - The Hearst Foundations fund educational institutions demonstrating uncommon success in preparing students to thrive in a global society. The Foundations' focus is largely on higher education, but they also fund innovative models of early childhood and K-12 education, as well as professional development.

HEALTH - The Hearst Foundations assist leading regional hospitals, medical centers and specialized medical institutions providing access to high-quality healthcare for low-income populations. In response to the shortage of healthcare professionals necessary to meet the country's evolving needs, the Foundations also fund programs designed to enhance skills and increase the number of practitioners and educators across roles in healthcare. Because the Foundations seek to use their funds to create a broad and enduring impact on the nation's health, support for medical research and the development of young investigators is also considered.

SOCIAL SERVICE - The Hearst Foundations fund direct-service organizations that tackle the roots of chronic poverty by applying effective solutions to the most challenging social and economic problems. The Foundations prioritize supporting programs that have proven successful in facilitating economic independence and in strengthening families. Preference is also given to programs with the potential to scale productive practices in order to reach more people in need.

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Grants Program - Human Rights and Social Justice
Blaustein (Morton K and Jane) Foundation

Letters of intent and proposals are accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

The goal of this program is to advance fundamental human rights both in the United States and abroad.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The goal of this program is to advance fundamental human rights both in the United States and abroad. Areas of interest include: Equal justice for US citizens, as well as immigrants and asylum seekers in the United States, through legal strategies, advocacy and policy reform; Responses to urgent human rights crises created by natural disasters, civil strife, or war; and Social justice initiatives particularly around impoverished women and children, and vulnerable youth.

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Learning & Leadership Grants
NEA Foundation for the Improvement of Education

Applications accepted on an ongoing basis. Next deadline is October 15, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The sponsor provides support to public school teachers, public education support professionals, and/or faculty and staff in public institutions of higher education for one of the following two purposes: Grants to individuals fund participation in high-quality professional development experiences; or Grants to groups fund collegial study.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Grants support public school teachers, public education support professionals, and/or faculty and staff in public institutions of higher education for one of the following two purposes: Grants to individuals fund participation in high-quality professional development experiences, such as summer institutes or action research; or Grants to groups fund collegial study, including study groups, action research, lesson study, or mentoring experiences for faculty or staff new to an assignment.

All professional development must improve practice, curriculum, and student achievement. Decisions regarding the content of the professional growth activities must be based upon an assessment of student work undertaken with colleagues, and must be integrated into the institutional planning process. Recipients are expected to exercise professional leadership by sharing their new learning with their colleagues.

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Media Grantmaking
MacArthur (John D. & Catherine T.) Foundation

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

MacArthur's goal in media grantmaking is to provide the public with high-quality, professionally-produced documentary films, deep and analytical journalism, and well-produced news and public affairs programming. In a media environment characterized by proliferating information sources of varying degrees of reliability, the Foundation seeks to support serious, fact-based journalism for television, radio and the web, the type of original reporting that is likely to be blogged about, linked to, tweeted, and otherwise circulated throughout the Internet. Programs supported by the Foundation inform and educate their viewers about important and under-reported topics, provide balance and accurate information, encourage global conversations, and use technology to tell stories in engaging and interactive ways.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

MacArthur supports the production of social-issue documentary films on important contemporary topics, intended for a broad audience, particularly in the U.S. Over the last 30 years, we have supported over 200 films by some of the most critically acclaimed filmmakers in the country. Their documentary work combines exceptional storytelling with in-depth journalism. Many of these films have had a long life beyond festivals and broadcast, and been used in educational, community, and policymaking settings over many years, sparking conversations and activities that contribute to social and policy change.

Through an open call process, the program seeks to fund documentary projects that address the significant social challenges of our time or explore important but under-reported topics. Domestic and international topics are welcome, and preference will be given to projects that align with one of MacArthur's grantmaking areas. Support will be provided primarily for production and post-production activities, and to experienced filmmakers based in the U.S. with track records of completing excellent feature-length films that have been broadcast nationally and internationally and received critical recognition.

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Program Area Funding
The David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Letters of inquiry are required and are accepted on a rolling basis
Full submissions are by invitation only

SYNOPSIS: 

The Foundation supports leaders and institutions working to achieve a biologically rich, sustainable world where all families can plan for their children and all children reach their potential. We work on the issues our founders cared about most. 

Program Areas: 

  • Conservation and Science
  • Population and Reproductive Health 
  • Children, Families, and Communities
  • Organizational Effectiveness and Philanthropy 

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Public Understanding of Science, Technology & Economics
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

The Foundation makes grants year-round.

SYNOPSIS: 

This program seeks to bridge the two cultures--the humanities and the sciences--through support of books, radio, film, television, theatre, and new media to reach a wide, non-specialized audience.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The program's primary aim is to build bridges between the two cultures of science and the humanities and to develop a common language so that they can better understand and speak to one another--and ultimately to grasp that they belong to a single common culture. The Foundation has established a nationwide initiative that works through programs in books, theater, film, television, radio, and new media to commission, develop, produce, and distribute new work and new initiatives that focus on science and technology for the lay public.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES:

Interested grantseekers with a relevant project idea should e-mail a one page letter of inquiry to Program Director Doron Weber.

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Transatlantic Networks of Excellence in Cardiovascular and Neurovascular Research
Fondation Leducq

LOI due: Sept. 5, 2018
Application due (by invitation only): Feb. 14, 2019

Fondation Leducq is a private charitable foundation, based in Paris, France, dedicated to improving human health through international efforts to combat cardiovascular and neurovascular disease. In support of this mission the Fondation Leducq has created the Transatlantic Networks of Excellence in Cardiovascular and Neurovascular Research Program,which promotes internationally collaborative basic, translational, and clinical research in cardiovascular and neurovascular disease.

The principal aim of this program is to foster outstanding and innovative scientific research by bringing together international teams of researchers with complementary expertise and resources to work together on a common thematic problem. Proposals should aim to generate new knowledge with the potential to advance the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of cardiovascular and neurovascular disease. Early career investigators play a vital role in these networks, which provide an excellent context for training and career development in cardiovascular and neurovascular research.

With the Transatlantic Network of Excellence Program,the Fondation Leducq looks to support original and outstanding research in the areas of the foundation's mission, i.e., cardiovascular and neurovascular disease. Applicants are encouraged to think innovatively and to propose bold ideas. Nevertheless, while the foundation will bear the risks inherent in innovative research, submitted proposals should not be merely speculative, and all applicants should provide a clear rationale for the research plan.

Networks should strive to advance knowledge on a defined theme, which may cover a variety of interrelated topics or subjects, by capitalizing on the resources and multidisciplinary expertise available within the network. Their overarching principal aim might be, for example, to test a specific hypothesis, to seek to understand a fundamental mechanistic question, to attempt a breakthrough on a particularly difficult research problem, or to propose a big new idea in cardiovascular or neurovascular research.

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Simons Early Career Investigator in Marine Microbial Ecology and Evolution Awards
Simons Foundation

Reference Letters due: Oct. 30, 2018
Agency LOI due: Nov. 6, 2018 (5:00 p.m. EST)
Full Application due (by invitation only): Feb. 22, 2019

Microbes inhabit and sustain all habitats on Earth. In the oceans, microbes capture solar energy, catalyze biogeochemical transformations of important elements, produce and consume greenhouse gases, and provide the base of the food web. 

The Simons Foundation is now accepting applications for its Simons Early Career Investigator in Marine Microbial Ecology and Evolution Awards. The purpose of these awards is to help launch the careers of outstanding investigators in the field of marine microbial ecology and evolution who will advance our understanding through experiments, modeling or theory. Projects focusing on the microbiomes of invertebrates or vertebrates or on paleontological records will not be considered this year. Investigators with backgrounds in different fields are encouraged to apply.

Grants will be for $180,000 USD per year, including indirect costs (limited to 20 percent of modified total direct costs), for a period of three years, subject to annual reviews and continuation of research in areas relevant to the purpose of this program.

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Clinical Neuroscience Research Grant Program
The Dana Foundation

Preliminary Proposal due: Accepted on a rolling basis
Full Application due (by invitation only): TBA

Research on brain diseases, as on any disease affecting humans, often proceeds from taking promising results produced in studying an animal model of a disease and applying these results to the first studies in human patients who have that disease. These first studies in patients usually determine whether the animal model has accurately portrayed what is occurring in the human disease, and whether the intervention (such as a drug, a device, or a surgical technique) works safely in patients. This first research in humans also tries to determine whether these interventions, which appeared to work in the animal model of the disease, also show promise in treating patients who have the disease.

In 2003, the Dana Foundation began inviting grant proposals for these "first in man" studies involving a few patients with devastating brain disease for which there currently is no effective treatment. Funded researchers set up "controlled clinical studies" in a small number of patients with a specific brain disease, based on promising animal studies suggesting that a specific therapy either treated the condition or prevented it from getting worse. In these controlled clinical studies, the new therapy is tested in some of the patients while the other patients continue to receive currently available treatment. Through this process, clinical researchers determine whether the tested new therapy shows initial promise beyond currently available treatment.

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Bioscience Research Projects
Whitehall Foundation

Agency LOI due: Jan. 15, 2019
Full Application due: June 1, 2019

Through its program of grants and grants-in-aid, the Whitehall Foundation assists scholarly research in the life sciences. It is the Foundation's policy to assist those dynamic areas of basic biological research that are not heavily supported by Federal Agencies or other foundations with specialized missions. In order to respond to the changing environment, the Whitehall Foundation periodically reassesses the need for financial support by the various fields of biological research.

The Foundation emphasizes the support of young scientists at the beginning of their careers and productive senior scientists who wish to move into new fields of interest. Consideration is given, however, to applicants of all ages. The chief criteria for support are the quality and creativity of the research as well as the commitment of the Principal Investigator (a minimum time allocation of 20 percent is required). The principal investigator must hold no less than the position of assistant professor, or the equivalent, in order to participate in the application process. The applicant need not be in a tenure track position but must be an independent researcher and have Principal Investigator status at his/her institution, usually construed as having lab space independent of another Principal Investigator.

The Foundation is currently interested in basic research in neurobiology, defined as follows: Invertebrate and vertebrate (excluding clinical) neurobiology, specifically investigations of neural mechanisms involved in sensory, motor, and other complex functions of the whole organism as these relate to behavior. The overall goal should be to better understand behavioral output or brain mechanisms of behavior.

Research Grants

Research grants are available to established scientists of all ages working at accredited institutions in the United States. Applications will be judged on the scientific merit and the innovative aspects of the proposal as well as on the competence of the applicant. Research grants of up to three years will be provided. A renewal grant with a maximum of two years is possible, but it will be awarded on a competitive basis. Research grants will not be awarded to investigators who have already received, or expect to receive, substantial support from other sources, even if it is for an unrelated purpose. Research grants normally range from $30,000 to $75,000 per year.

Grants-In-Aid

The Grants-in-Aid program is designed for researchers at the assistant professor level who have experienced difficulty in competing for research funds because they have not yet become firmly established. Grants-in-Aid can also be made to senior scientists. All applications will be judged on the scientific merit and innovative aspects of the proposal, as well as on past performance and evidence of the applicant's continued productivity. Grants-in-Aid are awarded for a one-year period and do not exceed $30,000.

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National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Advanced Neural Prosthetics Research and Development (U01)
National Institutes of Health

Letter of Intent Deadline: One month prior to application due date
Full Proposal Deadline: Standard Dates apply, by 5 p.m. local time

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage applications to pursue translational and pilot clinical studies for neural prosthetics. The program will utilize the cooperative agreement mechanism to enable support for milestone-driven projects for the development and demonstration of clinically-useful neural prosthetic devices. Activities supported in this program include implementation of clinical prototype devices, preclinical safety and efficacy testing, design verification and validation activities, pursuit of regulatory approval for clinical study, and proof-of-concept or pilot clinical studies.

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Advancing Interventions to Improve Medication Adherence (R01)
Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR)

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is October 5, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is being issued by the NIH Adherence Network through the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR), with participation from multiple NIH Institutes and Centers. This FOA seeks Research Project Grant (R01) applications that propose interventions to significantly improve medication adherence in individuals. Applications may target medication adherence in the context of treatment for a single illness or chronic condition (e.g., hypertension), to stave off a disease recurrence (e.g., cancer) or for multiple comorbid conditions (e.g., hypertension, diabetes, alcohol use disorders and HIV/AIDS). A well-articulated theoretical or conceptual framework is key for applications encouraged under this announcement. Primary outcomes of the research can include a patient self-report of medication adherence, but must also at least one non-self-report measure of medication adherence (e.g., pharmacy refill records, electronic monitoring, etc.). In addition, applications are encouraged to include a relevant health outcome or biomarker (e.g., blood pressure, viral load in HIV-infected individuals, cholesterol levels, HbA1c) that is expected to be affected by changes in the targeted adherence behavior. For diseases without identified biomarkers, inclusion of a clinical assessment (e.g., a medicine blood level, diagnostic interview or an independent clinician rating of the symptoms and behaviors) may be considered. 

 

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AHRQ Health Services Research Projects (R01)
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality/DHHS

Standard Due Dates

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) invites applications for discrete, specified health services research projects. The projects will be performed by the named investigator and study team. The R01 research plan proposed by the applicant institution/organization must be related to the mission and portfolio priority research interests of AHRQ. This FOA will use the AHRQ Research Project Grant (R01) award mechanism.

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Avenir Award Program for Research on Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS (DP2)
National Institute on Drug Abuse

Avenir means future in French, and this award looks toward the future by supporting early stage investigators proposing highly innovative studies. The award will support those in an early stage of their career who may lack the preliminary data required for an R01 grant, but who propose high impact research and who show promise of being tomorrow's leaders in the field. NIDA has developed two Avenir Award Programs, one for HIV/AIDS research and the other for genetics or epigenetics studies. The Avenir Award Program for Research on Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS will support creative individuals who wish to pursue innovative research at the nexus of substance abuse and HIV/AIDS. The Avenir Award Program for Research on Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS will support research approaches for substance using populations with or at risk for HIV/AIDS that may lead to improved preventive interventions, improved therapies and/or long term retention in care, and ultimately, eradication of HIV.

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Mechanisms, Models, Measurement and Management in Pain Research (R21)(R01)(R03)
National Institutes of Health

The sponsors invite applications to stimulate and foster a wide range of basic, clinical, and translational studies on pain as they relate to the missions of these ICs. New advances are needed in every area of pain research, from the micro perspective of molecular sciences to the macro perspective of behavioral and social sciences. Although great strides have been made in some areas, such as the identification of neural pathways of pain, the experience of pain and the challenge of treatment have remained uniquely individual and unsolved. Furthermore, our understanding of how and why individuals transition to a chronic pain state after an acute insult is limited. Research to address these issues conducted by interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research teams is strongly encouraged, as is research from underrepresented, minority, disabled, or women investigators.

http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-13-119.html (R21)

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/PA-files/PA-13-118.html (RO1)

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/PA-files/PA-13-117.html (R03)


Mentored Quantitative Research Development Award (Parent K25)
National Institutes of Health/DHHS

January 7, 2015, February 12, 2015, May 7, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

National Institutes of Health (NIH) and its participating Institutes and Centers invite applications for the Mentored Quantitative Research Development Award. The award is designed to attract to NIH-relevant research those investigators whose quantitative science and engineering research has thus far not been focused primarily on questions of health and disease. The K25 award will provide support and "protected time" for a period of supervised study and research for productive professionals with quantitative (e.g., mathematics, statistics, economics, computer science, imaging science, informatics, physics, chemistry) and engineering backgrounds to integrate their expertise with NIH-relevant research. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The overall goal of the NIH Research Career Development program is to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists are available in appropriate scientific disciplines to address the Nation's biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs. Examples of quantitative scientific and technical backgrounds considered appropriate for this award include, but are not limited to: mathematics, statistics, economics, computer science, imaging science, informatics, physics, chemistry, and engineering. The specific objectives of the K25 award are to:

--Encourage research-oriented quantitative scientists and engineers with little or no experience in biomedicine, bioengineering, bioimaging, or behavioral research to gain fundamental knowledge in these areas and develop relevant research skills, and to gain experience in current concepts, advanced methods, and experimental approaches that will allow them to conduct basic or clinical biomedical, behavioral, bioimaging, or bioengineering research, and to become independent investigators or play leading roles in multi-disciplinary research teams.

--Increase the pool of quantitative researchers who can conduct biomedical, behavioral, or bioengineering studies, capitalizing on the quantitative backgrounds of these investigators to inform new directions in biomedical, behavior and bioengineering research.

--Provide a unique opportunity for candidates holding degrees in quantitative science or engineering to embark on three to five years of special study, including course work, seminars, meetings, and mentored research, to achieve the career enhancement goals outlined above.

Because of the focus on a progression toward independence as a quantitative biomedical, behavioral, bioimaging, or bioengineering researcher, the prospective candidate for the Mentored Quantitative Research Career Development Award will require enhanced skills in the experimental, theoretical and conceptual approaches used in biomedicine, behavioral science, bioimaging or bioengineering. To satisfy this requirement, the candidate should propose a period of study and career development that is complementary to his or her previous research and experience. 

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NIAID Career Transition Award (K22)

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is October 12, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

The purpose of the NIAID Career Transition Award (CTA) program is to increase and maintain a strong cohort of new and talented NIH-supported independent investigators that will address the health needs of the Nation. The NIAID CTA is specifically designed to facilitate the transition from a postdoctoral research position to an independent research position.

The overall goal of the NIH Research Career Development program is to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists is available in appropriate scientific disciplines to address the Nation's biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs. In addition to this opportunity, NIH Institutes and Centers (ICs) support a variety of other mentored career development programs designed to foster the transition of new investigators to research independence. These other programs may be more suitable for particular candidates.  NIH also supports non-mentored career development programs for independent investigators. More information about Career programs may be found at the NIH Extramural Training Mechanisms website.

The objective of the of the NIAID Career Transition Award is to support postdoctoral fellows transitioning to positions of assistant professor or equivalent, and initiate a successful biomedical career as an independent research scientist.

NIH believes that the creativity and innovation of new independent investigators in their early career stages play an integral role in addressing our Nation's biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs. However, the average age of first-time (new) Principal Investigators obtaining R01 research funding from the NIH has risen to 42 years for Ph.D. degree holders and 44 years for M.D./Ph.D. degree holders in 2013. The intent of the NIAID K22 program is to help alleviate this trend and to assist new investigators in transitioning to stable independent research positions at an earlier age and with an enhanced probability of success in obtaining independent NIH or other independent research support.

Nature of the career/research transition opportunity

The K22 award will provide two years of support to conduct biomedical research as an independent scientist at an extramural sponsoring institution/organization to which the individual has been recruited, been offered and has accepted a tenure-track full-time assistant professor position (or equivalent). This support is to allow the individual to continue to work toward establishing his/her own independent research program and prepare an application for regular research grant support (R01).

The postdoctoral fellow, also referred to as a candidate, submits a K22 application from the institution where s/he currently pursues his/her postdoctoral research training.  The application will be peer reviewed and assigned an overall impact score.  Successful candidates (i.e. whose application has received a fundable overall impact score) will receive an approval letter from NIAID that will include the terms and conditions to activate the K22 award. In order to activate the K22 award, the candidate will need to secure a tenure-track full-time assistant professor position within a year of the receipt of the approval letter.  Once the assistant professor position has been secured, the candidate will submit updated information about the K22 application with the support of the sponsoring institution.  The sponsoring institution can be the same as the post-doctoral institution, though it is most likely a different institution from the original submission of the K22 application.  The updated information of the transition to an assistant professor position at the sponsoring institution will be evaluated by senior NIAID staff to ensure that all programmatic requirements are met prior to the activation of the K22 award. The details of the requirements for the activation of the K22 award are described in Section VI of this announcement.

 

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NIAID Research Education Program (R25)
National Institutes of Health

Letter of Intent due: Nov. 6, 2017
Full Application due: Dec. 6, 2017

The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research education activities in the mission areas of the NIH. The over-arching goal of this National Institute of Allergy and infectious Diseases (NIAID) R25 program is to support educational activities that complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation's biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs in NIAID mission areas.

To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on Courses for Skills Development, Research Experiences and Mentoring Activities related to NIAID's mission areas.

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NIAMS Small Grant Program For New Investigators (R03)
National Institute of Arthritis & Musculoskeletal & Skin Diseases/NIH/DHHS

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is November 20, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) invites applications to stimulate and facilitate the entry of promising new investigators into research on arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases and injuries. This FOA will provide support for pilot research that is likely to lead to a subsequent individual research project grant (R01). Clinical trials of any phase will not be supported by this FOA. This program will use the NIH Small Research Grant (R03) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The NIAMS Small Grant program (R03) is designed to facilitate the entry of promising new investigators into research on arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases and injuries by providing support for pilot research that is likely to lead to a subsequent individual research project grant (R01).

Division of Musculoskeletal Diseases--supports fundamental research in bone, muscle and connective tissue biology as well as research aimed at improving the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases and injuries of the musculoskeletal system and its component tissues. Key public health problems addressed by this research include osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, orthopaedic disorders and injuries, including sports medicine and regenerative medicine and the muscular dystrophies.

Division of Skin and Rheumatic Diseases--promotes and supports basic, translational and clinical studies of skin biology; wound healing; autoimmune, inflammatory, and genetic skin disorders; adult as well as pediatric rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, lupus, scleroderma, Sjögren's syndrome, and autoimmune myositis. Approaches that could be utilized by this program may include, but are not limited to genetics and genomics research, identification of risk factors, autoimmunity and inflammation research, biopsychosocial/behavioral research, outcomes and health services research, and research leading to prevention, diagnosis and cure of these disorders.

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NIDA Avant-Garde Award Program for HIV/AIDS and Drug Use Research (DP1)
National Institute on Drug Abuse

The NIDA Avant-Garde Award Program for HIV/AIDS Research supports individual scientists of exceptional creativity who propose high-impact research that will open new areas of HIV/AIDS research and/or lead to new avenues for prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS among drug abusers. The term avant-garde is used to describe highly innovative approaches that have the potential to be transformative. The proposed research should reflect approaches and ideas that are substantially different from those already being pursued by the investigator or others. The NIDA Avant-Garde award supports innovative, basic research that may lead to improved preventive interventions or therapies; creative, new strategies to prevent disease transmission; novel approaches to improve disease outcomes; and creative approaches to eradicating HIV or improving the lives of those living with HIV.

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NIDA Avenir Award Program for Genetics or Epigenetics of Substance Abuse (DP2)
National Institute on Drug Abuse

Avenir means future in French, and this award looks toward the future by supporting early stage investigators proposing highly innovative studies. The award will support those in an early stage of their career who may lack the preliminary data required for an R01 grant, but who propose high impact research and who show promise of being tomorrow's leaders in the field. NIDA has developed two Avenir Award Programs, one for HIV/AIDS research and the other for genetics or epigenetics studies.

The Genetic Avenir Award program supports early stage investigators proposing highly innovative studies that open new areas of research for the genetics or epigenetics of addiction. The award will support those in an early stage of their career who may lack the preliminary data required for an R01 grant, but who propose high impact research and who show promise of being tomorrow's leaders in the field of genetics or epigenetics of substance abuse.

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NIH Director's New Innovator Award Program (DP2) SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
National Institutes of Health

Special Announcement $1.5M DP2 Award
See Program Annoucement

The NIH Director's New Innovator (DP2) Award initiative supports a small number of early stage investigators of exceptional creativity who propose bold and highly innovative new research approaches that have the potential to produce a major impact on broad, important problems in biomedical and behavioral research. The New Innovator Award initiative complements ongoing efforts by NIH and its Institutes and Centers to fund early stage investigators through R01 grants, which continue to be the major sources of NIH support for early stage investigators. The NIH Director's New Innovator Award initiative is a component of the High Risk - High Reward Research Program of the NIH Common Fund.

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NIH Director's Pioneer Award (DP1) SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
National Institutes of Health

Special Announcement $2.5M DPI Award
See Program Announcement

The NIH Pioneer Award initiative complements NIH's traditional, investigator-initiated grant programs by supporting individual scientists of exceptional creativity who propose pioneering and possibly transforming approaches to addressing major biomedical or behavioral challenges that have the potential to produce an unusually high impact on a broad area of biomedical or behavioral research. To be considered pioneering, the proposed research must reflect substantially different scientific directions from those already being pursued in the investigator's research program or elsewhere.

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NINDS Requirements for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Development and Resource Sharing

The purpose of this Notice is to alert the research community to the current NINDS best practices guidelines for development and distribution of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) through the NINDS Repository, also known as the NINDS Human Genetics Resource Center. The iPSC lines available through the NINDS Repository were primarily developed through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and collaborations with government (California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM)) and non-government organizations (the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Association, the Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration, CHDI, the Hereditary Disease Foundation, the Huntington's Disease Society of America, the Michael J. Fox Foundation, and the Parkinson's Disease Foundation).

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NLM Express Research Grants in Biomedical Informatics (R01)
National Library of Medicine (NLM)

Standard dates apply. Next deadline is October 5, 2014

SYNOPSIS: 

National Library of Medicine (NLM) offers support for innovative research in biomedical informatics. The scope of NLM's interest in the research domain of informatics is interdisciplinary, encompassing informatics problem areas in the application domains of health care, public health, basic biomedical research, bioinformatics, biological modeling, translational research and health information management in disasters. NLM defines biomedical informatics as the science of optimal organization, management, presentation and utilization of information relevant to human health and biology. Informatics research produces concepts, tools and approaches that advance what is known in the field and have the capacity to improve human health. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) offers support for innovative research in biomedical informatics. The scope of NLM's interest in the research domain of informatics is interdisciplinary, encompassing informatics problem areas in the application domains of health care, public health, basic biomedical research, bioinformatics, biological modeling, translational research and health information management in disasters. NLM defines biomedical informatics as the science of optimal organization, management, presentation and utilization of information relevant to human health and biology. Informatics research produces concepts, tools and approaches that advance what is known in the field and have the capacity to improve human health. Informatics projects of interest to NLM involve the application of computer and information sciences concepts to information problems in a biomedical domain. NLM also supports research projects focused on biomedical (rather than informatics) research questions, but approached exclusively by novel or advanced informatics techniques applied to information and data produced by others.

The following basic informatics problem areas demonstrate the scope of NLM's research interests:

--Information & knowledge processing, including understanding, translation or summarization of natural language in real-time or near real-time, integration of heterogeneous data types.

--Advanced information retrieval, knowledge discovery in databases, discovery mining, and other techniques for in silico discovery and research including approaches for accelerating the linkage of phenomic and genomic information.

--Incorporation of machine intelligence into decision tools and resources for health care providers, scientists and consumers.

--Modeling complex data, simulations, information visualization and presentation approaches to enhance decisions, learning or understanding.

--Innovative approaches for ensuring privacy and security of clinical and biomedical research data.

Examples of application domains for these informatics problem areas include, but are not limited to:

--Health Care; Public Health; Disaster Information Management;

--Biological, Social and Behavioral Research relating to human health;

--Multi-level computational models of biological and clinical processes;

--Translational Research that supports (1) uses of data in electronic health records to support biomedical research and (2) translation of biomedical research outcomes through application to problems in clinical care;

--Information Sciences; Simulation; User customization; Virtual environments; Innovative information techniques.

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Program Announcements

  • Advancing Research in      Voice Disorders (R21), (R01)
         (PA-14-235) , (PA-14-236)
         National Institute on Deafness and Other      Communication Disorders
         Application      Receipt/Submission Date(s): Multiple      dates, see announcement.  

  • NIOSH Support for      Conferences and Scientific Meetings (U13)
         (PAR-14-229) 
         National Institute for Occupational Safety and      Health
         Application      Receipt/Submission Date(s): Multiple      dates, see announcement.

Program Notices

  • Notice of Clarification      Regarding the Additional Educational Information Required for PA-14-147,      148, and 149 "Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award      (NRSA) Individual Predoctoral Fellowship (Parent F31, F31 - Div, and F32)"
         (NOT-OD-14-094)  (NOT-OD-14-095) (NOT-OD-14-096) National      Institutes of Health

  • Notice of NEI      Participation in Administrative Supplements for Research on Dietary      Supplements (Admin Supp)
         (NOT-EY-14-001)
         National Eye Institute

  • Notice of Clarification      and Correction to PAR-14-207 "Center for Inherited Disease Research      (CIDR) High Throughput Sequencing and Genotyping Resource Access      (X01)"
         (NOT-HG-14-028)
         National Human Genome Research Institute

  • Notice of NHLBI      Participation in PAR-14-201 "Administrative Supplements for Research      on Dietary Supplements (Admin Supp)"
         (NOT-HL-14-224)
         National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Notice to Correct      NOT-NS-13-040 "Notice of Intent to Publish a Funding Opportunity      Announcement for the NINDS Exploratory Grant Program in Parkinson's      Disease Research (P20)" 
         (NOT-NS-14-033)
         National Institute of Neurological Disorders and      Stroke

Request for Applications

  • Nutrition Obesity      Research Centers (NORCs) (P30) 
         (RFA-DK-14-002)
         National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and      Kidney Diseases
         Application Receipt Date(s): November 25, 2014 and June 18, 2015

  • Development of an      Integrated Mathematical Model for Comparative Characterization of Complex      Molecules (U01)
         (RFA-FD-14-082)
         Food and Drug Administration
         Application Receipt Date(s): June 30, 2014

Weekly NIH Funding Opportunities and Notices
National Institutes of Health

Click on the link below to view a weekly update of NIH funding opportunities.

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HEAL Initiative: Pragmatic and Implementation Studies for the Management of Pain to Reduce Opioid Prescribing (PRISM) (UG3/UH3)
National Institutes of Health

Agency LOI due: Jan. 8, 2019
Full Application due: Feb. 8, 2019

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages UG3/UH3 phased cooperative research applications to conduct efficient, large-scale pragmatic or implementation trials to improve pain management and reduce the unnecessary use of opioid medications. Awards made under this FOA will initially support a one-year milestone-driven planning phase (UG3), with possible transition to an implementation phase (UH3) of up to four years duration (five years total for the two phases). UG3 projects that have met the scientific milestone and feasibility requirements may transition to the UH3 phase. The UG3/UH3 application must be submitted as a single application, following the instructions described in this FOA.

The overall goal of this initiative is to support the real world assessment of health care strategies and clinical practices and procedures in health care systems that may lead to improved pain management along with a reduction in unnecessary opioid prescribing. This FOA requires that the intervention under study be embedded into health care delivery system, real world settings.  Studies can propose to integrate interventions that have demonstrated efficacy into health care systems; or implement health care system changes to improve adherence to evidence-based guidelines. Trials should be conducted across three or more health care systems (HCS) and will become part of and work with the NIH HCS Research Collaboratory supported through the NIH Common Fund.

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Mechanism for Time-Sensitive Drug Abuse Research (R21)
National Institutes of Health

Agency LOI due: Jan. 8, 2019
Full Application due: Feb. 8, 2019

This funding opportunity announcement will support pilot, feasibility or exploratory research in five priority areas in substance use epidemiology and health services, including: 1) responses to sudden and severe emerging drug issues (e.g., the ability to look into a large and sudden spike in opioid or synthetic cannabinoid use/overdoses in a particular community); 2) responses to emerging marijuana trends and topics related to the shifting policy landscape; 3) responses to unexpected and time-sensitive prescription drug abuse research opportunities (e.g., new state or local efforts); 4) responses to unexpected and time-sensitive medical system issues (e.g., opportunities to understand addiction services in the evolving health care system); and 5) responses to unexpected and time-sensitive criminal or juvenile justice opportunities (e.g., new system and/or structural level changes) that relate to drug abuse and access and provision of health care service.

It should be clear that the knowledge gained from the proposed study is time-sensitive and that an expedited rapid review and funding are required in order for the scientific question to be answered (i.e., an imminent policy change will not allow for standard review and funding timeline).

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Lymphatics in Health and Disease in the Digestive System (R01)
National Institutes of Health

Agency LOI due: Jan. 21, 2019
Full Application due: Feb. 21, 2019

The purpose of this FOA is to invite applications that investigate aspects of lymphatic vessel physiology, development and pathophysiology related to health and diseases of the digestive system. Studies to understand the factors that control local lymphatic vessel functional anatomy and physiology and development during health or disease in this system and its organs, and the mechanisms by which alterations of lymphatic vessel function affect organ function, are of interest. However, studies with the major focus on immune mechanisms, role of lymphatics in cancer metastasis and study of lymphatic vessels in organs other than those from the digestive system will not be considered responsive.

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U.S.-China Program for Biomedical Collaborative Research (R01)
National Institutes of Health

Agency LOI due: Jan. 21, 2019
Full Application due: Feb. 21, 2019

The purpose of the U.S.-China Program for Biomedical Collaborative Research is to stimulate collaborative basic, translational, and clinical research between United States-based researchers and Chinese researchers in the areas of cancer, environmental health, heart disease, blood disorders, diseases of the eye and visual system, mental health, and neurological disorders. Partnering U.S. and Chinese investigators must work jointly to submit identical applications to NIH and National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), respectively. U.S. investigators must respond to the announcement from NIH, including the Chinese application as an attachment, and Chinese investigators must respond to a separate funding announcement from NSFC, including the NIH application as an attachment.  

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Weekly NIH Funding Opportunities and Notices
National Institutes of Health

Posted Feb. 22, 2019

Click on the Program URL below for the latest in NIH funding opportunities and notices.

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NLM Grants for Scholarly Works in Biomedicine and Health (G13)
National Institutes of Health

Agency LOI due: Jan. 26, 2019
Full Application due: Feb. 26, 2019

National Library of Medicine (NLM) Grants for Scholarly Works in Biomedicine and Health are awarded for the preparation of book-length manuscripts and other works of academic and/or public health policy value to U.S. health professionals, public health officials, biomedical researchers and historians of the health sciences.

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ImmuneChip: Engineering Microphysiological Immune Tissue Platforms (U01)
National Institutes of Health

Agency LOI due: Jan. 28, 2019
Full Application due: Feb. 27, 2019

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to promote the development of in vitro platforms that recapitulate components of the human immune system. Applications that qualify for this funding will focus on engineering 3-D in vitro microphysiological immune system tissues, adding immune system responsiveness to existing in vitro platforms, and/or in vitro modeling of autoimmune diseases and inflammation.

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Promoting Research on Music and Health: Fundamentals and Applications (R01)
National Institutes of Health

Agency LOI due: Jan. 15, 2019
Full Application due: Feb. 28, 2019

This broad spectrum funding opportunity announcement is intended to: (1) increase our understanding of how music affects the brain, body, and behavior and (2) use that knowledge to develop evidence-based music interventions to enhance health or treat specific diseases and disorders.

Proposed R01 projects can investigate how music is processed by or modifies the brain, or how it affects specific biological functions during childhood development and learning, adulthood, and aging. Projects can also include preliminary interventions that provide a basis for therapeutic interventions. When appropriate, collaborations among basic researchers, technology developers, music intervention experts, or other clinical researchers are highly encouraged.

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Exploring Molecular Links Between Dietary Interventions and Circadian Rhythm (R01)
National Institutes of Health

Agency LOI due: Feb. 6, 2019
Full Application due: Mar. 6, 2019

This funding opportunity announcement encourages innovative experimental approaches to explore how dietary intervention entrains peripheral or central clocks to maintain tissue homeostasis and how circadian regulation integrates with various dietary strategies to achieve optimal health benefits.

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Innovative Molecular and Cellular Analysis Technologies for Basic and Clinical Cancer Research (R21)
National Institutes of Health

Agency LOI due: Feb. 7, 2019
Full Application due: Mar. 7, 2019

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicits grant applications proposing exploratory research projects focused on the early-stage development of highly innovative technologies offering novel molecular or cellular analysis capabilities for basic or clinical cancer research. The emphasis of this FOA is on supporting the development of novel capabilities involving a high degree of technical innovation for targeting, probing, or assessing molecular and cellular features of cancer biology.

Well-suited applications must offer the potential to accelerate and/or enhance research in the areas of cancer biology, early detection and screening, clinical diagnosis, treatment, control, epidemiology, and/or address issues associated with cancer health disparities. Technologies proposed for development may be intended to have widespread applicability but must be focused on improving molecular and/or cellular characterizations of cancer biology.

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A Census of Cells and Circuits in the Aging Brain (R01)
National Institutes of Health

Agency LOI due: Feb. 8, 2019
Full Application due: Mar. 8, 2019

This funding opportunity announcement intends to support pilot studies aimed to establish molecular, anatomical, and functional cell and circuit census data from selected brain regions of young and old C57BL/6J mice. This will complement and build on current BRAIN Initiative efforts while informing a design for a comprehensive characterization of cells and circuits in the brain across the lifespan, including the generation of a comprehensive 3D brain cell reference atlas of the aging mouse brain.

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U.S.-Brazil Collaborative Biomedical Research Program (R01)
National Institutes of Health

Agency LOI due: Feb. 8, 2019
Full Application due: Mar. 8, 2019

The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement is to promote collaborative biomedical research between the United States and Brazil under the U.S.-Brazil Collaborative Biomedical Research Program. Research areas supported under this program include allergy, immunology, and infectious diseases, including HIV/AIDS and its co-morbidities; neurological disorders and stroke; and environmental health sciences. This program represents an outstanding opportunity for U.S. and Brazil scientists to pursue collaborative research partnerships that address public health topics of mutual benefit to both nations.

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Research on Current Topics in Alzheimer's Disease and Its Related Dementias (R01)
National Institutes of Health

Application due: Mar. 11, 2019

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to invite applications proposing research on current topics in Alzheimer's disease and its related dementias. Further information on the high-priority topics of interest will be announced through a series of Notices published subsequent to this FOA.

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Human Three-Dimensional Cell Model Systems for Alzheimers Disease-Related Dementias (ADRDs) (UG3/UH3)
National Institutes of Health

Agency LOI due: Feb. 14, 2019
Full Application due: Mar. 14, 2019

This FOA invites applications that propose to develop, characterize and validate innovative human cellular model systems that recapitulate phenotypic, mechanistic and neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimers Disease-Related Dementias (ADRDs). Model systems will be expected to capture the complex, multi-faceted proteinopathies and/or vascular pathology observed in ADRDs, with multiple cell types represented in each model.

Years three to five will focus on the extensive characterization and perturbation of the cellular model systems. The overall goal of this FOA is to establish next generation human cellular model systems for ADRDs to serve as tools to interrogate molecular disease mechanisms and identify potential therapeutic targets.

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Research and Development for Genome Reference Representations (GRR) (U01)
National Institutes of Health

Agency Letter of Intent (LOI) due: Mar. 4, 2019
Full Application due: Apr. 2, 2019

The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) seeks to support research and development for a next-generation genome reference representation. This pan-genome model will be able to capture all human genome variation and support scalable analysis in a software framework that will set a robust foundation for open science. Projects will develop improved representations for computing on the information contained within the increasing numbers of diverse genome assemblies that will make up the human reference sequence going forwards.

Further research and development is needed to refine and implement a practical and robust representation with software to demonstrate the ability of the reference to enable active use of population-scale variation. The pan-genome representation will need to demonstrate efficiency, scalability, computational speed, ease of use, foster adoption of the reference, and support analysis tool development by other contributors for a wide range of purposes. The FOA will fund multiple projects that will together help set benchmarks and standards in this domain.

A primary requirement is to adhere to a high level of open science including open-source tools, standards, specifications, and robust software engineering to enable this core resource to be sustainable, widely integrated in the larger community and encourage outside contributions. Robust design is also expected to provide a foundation for independent efforts that may have enhanced privacy and security requirements.

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Mechanistic Studies on Chronic Alcohol Use and Sleep Homeostasis (R01)
National Institutes of Health

Agency LOI due: Mar. 17, 2019
Full Application due: Apr. 17, 2019

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), issued by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), encourages Research Project Grant (R01) applications proposing to conduct mechanistic studies on the relationships between sleep problems and alcohol dependence. A major impediment for recovery from alcohol use disorder (AUD) is the persistent sleep problems during abstinence promoting relapse.

The objective of this FOA is to promote research in animal models and human subjects on the reciprocal relationships between chronic alcohol use and sleep disruptions. The major goal is to understand the underlying mechanisms that will lead to improved treatments for alcohol dependence. NIAAA strongly encourages collaborative efforts between experts in sleep research and established alcohol investigators to facilitate the development of applications incorporating both areas of research. Projects measuring acute effects of alcohol, circadian changes and observational studies will not be considered responsive to this FOA.

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Summer Research Education Experience Program (R25)
National Institutes of Health

Agency LOI due: Apr. 25, 2019
Full Application due: May 28, 2019

The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research education activities in the mission areas of the NIH. The over-arching goal of this R25 program is to support educational activities that foster a better understanding of biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research and its implications.

To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on    research experiences for high school or undergraduate students or science teachers during the summer academic break.  The proposed program needs to fit within the mission of the participating IC that the application is being submitted to and should not have a general STEM focus.

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Achieving Tissue Robustness Through Harnessing Immune System Plasticity (R01)
National Institutes of Health

Application due: June 5, 2019

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) encourages state-of-the-art, systematic research approaches to elucidate the role of immune system plasticity in health and in the pathogenesis of dental, oral, and craniofacial (DOC) diseases. This FOA encourages applications that will seek to determine mechanisms underlying the ability or inability of the immune system to dynamically maintain its functional role against internal and external perturbations.

The expectation is that new knowledge derived from this research will facilitate development of novel, personalized immunomodulatory-based therapies that shift the balance between degenerative and regenerative processes toward regeneration disease management in a patient-specific manner across the lifespan.

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Computational Models of Immunity (U01)
National Institutes of Health

Agency LOI due: May 10, 2019
Full Application due: June 10, 2019

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicits applications developing computational models of immunity that advance understanding of the mechanisms required to induce and/or maintain protective immunity to infectious pathogens, other than HIV, and/or vaccines against such pathogens.

The main goal of this FOA is to advance development and application of computational models of immunity that are refined through iterative immunological experimentation to validate and improve the utility and robustness of the computational models. Another goal of this FOA is to make the computational models and data developed under this initiative readily available to the broader research community for further refinement or direct use in biological experimentation.

This program will also support workshops and symposia to foster the use of computational models of immunity by the broader research community.

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Shared Instrumentation Grant (SIG) Program (S10)
National Institutes of Health

Application due: May 31, 2019

The Shared Instrument Grant (SIG) Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems. The minimum award is $50,000 of direct costs. There is no maximum price limit for the instrument; however, the maximum award is $600,000 of direct costs.

Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffractometers, mass spectrometers, nuclear magnetic resonance, spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and light microscopes, cell sorters, and biomedical imagers.

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National Science Foundation (NSF)

Computational and Data-Enabled Science and Engineering (CDS&E)
National Science Foundation (multiple directorates)

Deadlines vary per directorate

SYNOPSIS: 

Advanced computational infrastructure and the ability to perform large-scale simulations and accumulate massive amounts of data have revolutionized scientific and engineering disciplines.  The goal of the CDS&E program is to identify and capitalize on opportunities for major scientific and engineering breakthroughs through new computational and data analysis approaches.  The intellectual drivers may be in an individual discipline or they may cut across more than one discipline in various Directorates.  The key identifying factor is that the outcome relies on the development, adaptation, and utilization of one or more of the capabilities offered by advancement of both research and infrastructure in computation and data, either through cross-cutting or disciplinary programs. 

The CDS&E program welcomes proposals in any area of research supported through the participating divisions that:

·         Promote the creation, development, and application of the next generation of mathematical, computational and statistical theories and tools that are essential for addressing the challenges presented to the scientific and engineering communities by the ever-expanding role of computational modeling and simulation and the explosion and production of digital experimental and observational data.

·         Promote and encourage integrated research projects that create, develop and apply novel computational, mathematical and statistical methods, algorithms, software, data curation, analysis, visualization and mining tools to address major, heretofore intractable questions in core science and engineering disciplines, including large-scale simulations and analysis of large and heterogeneous collections of data.

·         Encourage adventurous ideas that generate new paradigms and that create and apply novel techniques, generating and utilizing digital data in innovative ways to complement or dramatically enhance traditional computational, experimental, observational, and theoretical tools for scientific discovery and application.

·         Encourage ideas at the interface between scientific frameworks, computing capability, measurements and physical systems that enable advances well beyond the expected natural progression of individual activities, including development of science-driven algorithms to address pivotal problems in science and engineering and efficient methods to access, mine, and utilize large data sets.

Supplement requests to existing awards within a program that address one of the points above will also be considered. 

The CDS&E program in MPS explicitly addresses the distinct intellectual and technological discipline lying at the intersection of applied mathematics, statistics, computer science, and the core science disciplines of astronomy, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and materials research.  Proposals are expected to be relevant to mathematical and physical sciences.  The CDS&E program in ENG recognizes the importance of complex and heterogeneous data as well as high fidelity simulations over disparate scales that can be interrogated, analyzed, modeled, optimized or controlled, and even integrated with experiments or physical facilities representing engineering systems.  Proposals are expected to be relevant to engineering and to have cross-cutting and integrative themes.  The Engineering Directorate encourages the effective leveraging of NSF centers and public-private partnerships to realize CDS&E program objectives and accelerate innovation.  The CDS&E program in ACI encourages the development and use of new cyberinfrastructure capabilities that advance complex applications in science and engineering and further the integration of modeling, experiment and observation.  Proposals are expected to be relevant to ACI and are encouraged to leveraging existing or upcoming cyberinfrastructure investments.

Astronomy:  CDS&E encompasses those areas of inquiry where significant progress is critically dependent upon the application of new computational hardware, software, or algorithms, or upon the use of massive data sets. CDS&E encompasses fundamentally new approaches to large-scale simulation and to the analysis of large and heterogeneous collections of data, as well as research into the nature of algorithms and techniques that can be both enabled by data and enable more data-intensive research.

Chemistry: CDS&E encourages innovative and adventurous ideas that generate new paradigms at the algorithmic, software design and data acquisition levels in computational chemistry, simulations, chemical data analysis and cheminformatics, producing new approaches to gaining fundamental chemical knowledge and understanding. 

Materials Research:  CDS&E includes the creation, development, and application of computational tools, or the creation and application of novel techniques that utilize digital data in innovative ways to complement or dramatically enhance traditional computational, experimental, and theoretical methods to discover new materials, new materials-related phenomena, or advance fundamental understanding of materials.

Mathematical Sciences: CDS&E includes the creation, development, and application of the next generation of mathematical and statistical theories and tools that will be essential for addressing the challenges presented to the scientific and engineering communities by the ever expanding role of computational modeling and simulation on the one hand, and the explosion and production of digital and observational data on the other.

Physics:   CDS&E includes ideas at the interface between scientific frameworks and computing capability that enable advances well beyond the expected natural progress of either activity, including development of science-driven algorithms to address pivotal problems in physics and efficient methods to access and mine large data sets.

Directorate of Engineering: The CDS&E program in engineering recognizes the importance of engineering in CDS&E and vice-versa. Many natural and built engineering processes, devices and/or systems require high fidelity simulations over disparate scales that can be interrogated, analyzed, modeled, optimized or controlled, and even integrated with experiments or physical facilities. This program accepts proposals that confront and embrace the host of research challenges presented to the science and engineering communities by the ever-expanding role of computational modeling and simulation on the one hand, and experimental and/or observational data on the other.  The goal of the program is to promote the creation, development, and utilization of the next generation of theories, algorithms, methods, tools, and cyberinfrastructure in science and engineering applications.

Successful research supported by CDS&E in engineering will encompass all engineering and related disciplines that are potentially transformative and multidisciplinary and that address computational and/or data challenges.  Proposals submitted to this program should draw on productive intellectual partnerships that synergistically capitalize upon knowledge and expertise in multiple fields or sub-fields in science or engineering and/or in multiple types of organizations.  Proposals submitted to this program announcement should address the relevance of the proposed project to engineering.

Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport (CBET): CDS&E in CBET includes the use of high performance and emerging computational tools and environments in advancing mathematical modeling, simulation and analysis to describe and analyze with greater fidelity, complexity and scale, engineering processes in chemical, biochemical and biotechnology systems, bioengineering and living systems, sustainable energy and environmental systems, and transport and thermal-fluids systems.

Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation (CMMI): CDS&E in CMMI encourages the submission of proposals that meet the expectations of the Directorate of Engineering and include advancing mathematic modeling and simulation to describe and analyze, with greater fidelity, complexity and scale, as well as create and apply novel techniques that utilize digital data in innovative ways to complement or dramatically enhance traditional computational, experimental, and theoretical methods. Proposals should advance the frontiers in advanced manufacturing, mechanics and materials, tools for dynamics, monitoring and control of complex systems, resilient and sustainable infrastructures and novel theories, or algorithms and methods in systems engineering and design.

Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure (ACI):  CDS&E in ACI addresses research in cyberinfrastructure with the clear potential to impact multiple research disciplines through the development of the paradigms, algorithms and processes needed to provide general CDS&E solutions as part of comprehensive, integrated, sustainable and secure cyberinfrastructure.

The CDS&E program is not intended to replace existing programs that make awards that involve computation and the analysis of large data sets.  Rather, the CDS&E program is meant to fund awards that have a significant component of cyber development or cyber science that goes well beyond what would normally be included in these programs.  PIs should ask for consideration and review as a CDS&E proposal only if the proposal addresses at least one of these additional cyber components.  Any proposal submitted to the CDS&E program that does not satisfy at least one of these additional criteria will be reviewed within the context of the individual program.  A proposal that is requesting consideration within the context of CDS&E should begin the title with the identifying acronym "CDS&E:". 

 

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Cyberlearning and Future Learning Technologies (Cyberlearning)

Deadline: Various, see program announcement

The purpose of the Cyberlearning and Future Learning Technologies program is to integrate opportunities offered by emerging technologies with advances in what is known about how people learn to advance three interconnected thrusts:

  • Innovation: inventing and improving next-generation genres (types) of learning technologies, identifying new means of using technology for fostering and assessing learning, and proposing new ways of integrating learning technologies with each other and into learning environments to foster and assess learning;

  • Advancing understanding of how people learn in technology-rich learning environments: enhancing understanding of how people learn and how to better foster and assess learning, especially in technology-rich learning environments that offer new opportunities for learning and through data collection and computational modeling of learners and groups of learners that can be done only in such environments; and

  • Promoting broad use and transferability of new genres: extracting lessons from experiences with these technologies that can inform design and use of new genres across disciplines, populations, and learning environments; advancing understanding of how to foster learning through effective use these new technologies and the environments they are integrated into. 

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Cybermanufacturing Systems (CM)
National Science Foundation

Proposals accepted anytime

The Cybermanufacturing Systems (CM) Program supports fundamental research to enable the evolution of a wide range of network-accessed manufacturing services that:

  • employ applications (or "apps") that reside in the "cloud" and plug into an expansible, interactive architecture;
  • are broadly accessible, guarantee reliable execution and have capabilities that are transparent to users; and
  • are accessible at low cost to innovators and entrepreneurs, including both users and providers.

Current manufacturing software applications are predominantly large, manufacturer-centric, general-purpose programs with the universal applicability needed to justify their development, marketing and acquisition costs.  They usually have broad capabilities, but are cumbersome to learn and often require expert intervention.

There is an opportunity for researchers to pursue research and educational efforts to accelerate the creation of an interoperating, cross-process manufacturing service layer that enables the rapid, bottom-up transformation of access to manufacturing services.  Such a service layer can allow creative entrepreneurs and companies to both furnish and access manufacturing apps that span the full spectrum from ideation to physical realization, giving rise to an era of "cybermanufacturing." 

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Dear Colleague Letter - Support for Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure and Research during FY 2015-FY 2019
NSF - Advance Notice

90 Days after publication date

The purpose of this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) is to inform the natural hazards engineering research community of two forthcoming program solicitations anticipated to be issued by the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Directorate for Engineering, Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation, between April and June 2014, for the following: (1) operations of natural hazards engineering research infrastructure for FY 2015-FY 2019 and (2) research on multi-hazard resilient and sustainable civil infrastructure. NSF does not intend to provide additional information beyond this DCL until the program solicitations and any accompanying Frequently Asked Questions are issued, as those will be the official issuances for these competitions and take precedence over the information in this DCL. The anticipated due dates for full proposals submitted to these solicitations will be 90 days following the publication date.

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Dear Colleague Letter: BRAIN EAGERs to Enable Innovation Neurotechnologies to Reveal the Functional and Emergent Properties of Neural Circuits Underlying Behavior and Cognition

Deadline: This notice does not constitute a solicitation; therefore, no award of any kind will result from this notice.

This Dear Colleague Letter is aimed at identifying opportunities to leverage and synthesize technological and conceptual innovation across disciplines and scales to accelerate progress toward an integrated understanding of neural circuits in behavior and cognition, or more simply "catching circuits in action". The neuroscience research community and specialists in other areas including, but not limited to genetics, physiology, synthetic biology, engineering, physics, mathematics, statistics, behavior and cognition are encouraged to work across disciplines to develop new approaches and neurotechnology focused at understanding the properties of circuits that underlie behavior and/or cognition in any organism. Projects that take advantage of existing DBI investments in informatics, computing and other infrastructure, such as the Neuroscience Gateway, in novel ways are also eligible.

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Dear Colleague Letter: Commercialization Assistance Program (CAP): Supplemental Funding to Current SBIR/STTR Phase II Awards

Commercialization Assistance Program (CAP) supplements to Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program Phase II grants are intended to assist the small businesses in their technology commercialization efforts. Specifically, this supplemental funding is aimed at enabling the grantee to secure the services of a third-party service provider that will assist with one or more of the following commercialization activities:

  1. the identification and development of customers for the NSF-funded technology;
  2. providing advice on financing strategy and fundraising from private sector;
  3. establishing strategic partnerships with relevant stakeholders; and/or
  4. the evaluation and protection of intellectual property.

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Dear Colleague Letter: Computing About the Ebola Virus
Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure (ACI) (National Science Foundation)

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

November 13, 2014

Dear Colleague:

This Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) follows a recent National Science Foundation (NSF) DCL (NSF 15-006,http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf15006) that referred to the emergence of the lethal Ebola virus in the US and expressed NSF's interest in proposals to conduct non-medical, non-clinical care research that can be used immediately to better understand how to model and understand the spread of Ebola; educate about prophylactic behaviors; and encourage the development of products, processes, and learning that can address this global challenge.

In that DCL, NSF invited researchers to use the Rapid Response Research (RAPID) funding mechanism, which allows NSF to receive and review proposals having a severe urgency with regard to availability of, or access to, data, facilities or specialized equipment, as well as quick-response research on natural or anthropogenic disasters and similar unanticipated events.

The NSF Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure (ACI) is particularly interested in proposals that include software development activities, such as those that would be funded by the Computational and Data-Enabled Science and Engineering (CDS&E, http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=504813) or Software Structure for Sustained Innovation (SI2, http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf14520) programs, along with the use of petascale computing on Blue Waters, such as that which would be funded by the Petascale Computing Resource Allocations (PRAC, http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf14518) program. ACI encourages such submissions through this DCL.

Complete guidance on submitting a RAPID proposal may be found in the NSF Grant Proposal Guide (GPG):http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/policydocs/pappguide/nsf14001/gpg_2.jsp#IID1.

Questions about this specific DCL should be addressed to:

Daniel S. Katz, dkatz@nsf.gov or Rudolf Eigenmann, reigenma@nsf.gov.

Sincerely,

C. Suzanne Iacono
Acting Assistant Director
Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering

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Dear Colleague Letter: Integrated NSF Support Promoting Interdisciplinary Research and Education (INSPIRE)
National Science Foundation

Applications accepted on an ongoing basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

The Integrated NSF Support Promoting Interdisciplinary Research and Education (INSPIRE) pilot seeks to support bold interdisciplinary projects in all NSF-supported areas of science, engineering, and education research. INSPIRE has no targeted themes and serves as a funding mechanism for proposals that are required both to be interdisciplinary and to exhibit potentially transformative research (IDR and PTR, respectively). Complementing existing NSF efforts, INSPIRE was created to handle proposals whose: scientific advances lie outside the scope of a single program or discipline, such that substantial funding support from more than one program or discipline is necessary; lines of research promise transformational advances; and prospective discoveries reside at the interfaces of disciplinary boundaries that may not be recognized through traditional review or co-review.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The implementation of the INSPIRE pilot is based on two overarching goals:

Goal 1: To emphasize to the science, mathematics, engineering and education research community that NSF is welcoming to bold, unconventional ideas incorporating creative interdisciplinary approaches. INSPIRE seeks to attract unusually creative high-risk/high-reward "out of the box" interdisciplinary proposals.

Goal 2: To provide NSF Program Officers (POs) with additional tools and support to engage in cross-cutting collaboration and risk-taking in managing their awards portfolios.

INSPIRE supports projects that lie at the intersection of traditional disciplines, and is intended to 1) attract unusually creative high-risk / high-reward interdisciplinary proposals; 2) provide substantial funding, not limited to the exploratory stage of the pursuit of novel ideas (unlike NSF's EArly-concept Grants for Exploratory Research, or EAGER); and 3) be open to all NSF-supported areas of science, mathematics, engineering, and education research. NSF will initiate an external formative assessment to test whether the INSPIRE pilot is achieving program and portfolio-level goals.

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Dear Colleague Letter: Joint NSF/NOAA Agreement regarding the National Centers for Environmental Prediction and related AGS

Deadline: Not Specified

This letter announces opportunities in FY2014 and FY2015 to support the translation of research supported by the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS) to operations at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). AGS will provide support to enable the AGS research community to transition the basic research in which they are engaged to use in national operational activities at NCEP. This opportunity would support extended visits by AGS-supported investigators and research groups, including students and post-doctoral researchers to NOAA's NCEP. Support would be awarded in the form of a supplement to an existing NSF award. This opportunity provides AGS PIs an opportunity to advance their NSF-supported research by working closely with environmental scientists at NOAA's NCEP and having access to a wealth of real-time and archived datasets and computational facilities.

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Division of Materials Research: Topical Materials Research Programs (DMR-TMRP)
National Science Foundation

Application Window Date: Oct. 1-Nov. 1, 2017

Research supported by the Division of Materials Research (DMR) focuses on advancing fundamental understanding of materials, materials discovery, design, synthesis, characterization, properties, and materials-related phenomena. DMR awards enable understanding of the electronic, atomic, and molecular structures, mechanisms, and processes that govern nanoscale to macroscale morphology and properties; manipulation and control of these properties; discovery of emerging phenomena of matter and materials; and creation of novel design, synthesis, and processing strategies that lead to new materials with unique characteristics.

These discoveries and advancements transcend traditional scientific and engineering disciplines. The Division supports research and education activities in the United States through funding of individual investigators, teams, centers, facilities, and instrumentation. Projects supported by DMR are essential for the development of future technologies and industries that meet societal needs, as well preparation of the next generation of materials researchers.

This solicitation applies to the following six DMR Topical Materials Research Programs that fund research and educational projects by individual investigators or small groups: Biomaterials (BMAT), Condensed Matter Physics (CMP), Electronic and Photonic Materials (EPM), Metals and Metallic Nanostructures (MMN), Polymers (POL), and Solid-State and Materials Chemistry (SSMC). It does not apply to the following two DMR Topical Materials Research Programs, which have their own solicitations: Ceramics (CER) (NSF 16-597) and Condensed Matter and Materials Theory (CMMT) (NSF 16-596).

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Earth Sciences: Instrumentation and Facilities (EAR/IF)
Directorate for Geosciences and Division of Earth Sciences (National Science Foundation)

Proposals accepted on a rolling basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

The Instrumentation and Facilities Program in the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR/IF) supports meritorious requests for infrastructure that promotes research and education in areas supported by the Division (see http://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=EAR). EAR/IF will consider proposals for:

    1. Acquisition or Upgrade of Research Equipment that will advance laboratory and field investigations and student research training opportunities in the Earth sciences. The maximum request is $750,000. The maximum request for upgrade of research group computing facilities is $75,000.
    2. Development of New Instrumentation, Techniques or Software that will extend current research and research training capabilities in the Earth sciences. The maximum request is $750,000.
    3. Support of National or Regional Multi-User Facilities that will make complex and expensive instruments, systems of instruments or services broadly available to the Earth science research and student communities.
    4. Support for Early Career Investigators to facilitate expedient development and operation of new research infrastructure proposed by the next generation of leaders in the Earth Sciences. The Early Career opportunity specifically allows for submission of a proposal for Acquisition or Upgrade of Research Equipment or Development of New Instrumentation, Techniques or Software which may include additional budget line items associated with support of a new full-time technician who will be dedicated to manage, operate and maintain the instrument(s) being requested. Any request for technical support under this opportunity is limited to three years duration. The maximum total request is $1,000,000.

Planned research uses of requested instruments, software, and facilities must include basic research on Earth processes SUPPORTED BY CORE PROGRAMS OR SPECIAL PROGRAMS OF THE DIVISION OF EARTH SCIENCES (see http://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=EAR for a current list of programs funded by the Division of Earth Sciences).

Support is available through grants or cooperative agreements awarded in response to investigator-initiated proposals.

Human resource development and education are expected to be an integral part of all proposals submitted to EAR/IF.

Efforts to support participation of underrepresented groups in laboratory and/or field instrument use and training are encouraged.

All proposers to EAR/IF are encouraged to consider Support of Outreach and/or Broadening Participation Activities. Proposals submitted to the EAR/IF Program may request up to $20,000 for such activities (please refer to Sections V.A Proposal Preparation Instructions and V.B Budgetary Information). Proposals for Support of National or Regional Multi-User Facilities are excluded from the $20,000 maximum for outreach and broadening participation activities.

Proposals requesting equipment, infrastructure or personnel that will also serve disciplines outside the Earth sciences may be jointly reviewed with other programs within the Foundation. EAR/IF will consider co-funding of projects with other NSF programs and other agencies. Potential applications who consider joint review a possibility for their proposal are encouraged to contact the relevant program officer to discuss this possibility.

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Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program Directorate for Biological Sciences/NSF

Deadlines: July 21, 2014 (CISE) (BIO) (EHR) July 22, 2014 (ENG) July 23, 2014 (GEO) (MPS) (SBE)

CAREER: The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. Such activities should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from junior faculty members at all CAREER-eligible organizations and especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply.

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Recompetition of the Management of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory

Deadline: TBD

Deadline:  This notice does not constitute a solicitation; therefore, no award of any kind will result from this notice. Although the competition is still in the planning stage, NSF anticipates that a program solicitation will be issued in the second quarter of calendar year 2014.

Consistent with the National Science Board Resolution on Competition and Recompetition of NSF Awards (NSB-08-12), NSF will carry out a competition for the next cooperative agreement to manage and operate the IceCube Neutrino Observatory through an open, merit-based external peer-review process. The Division of Polar Programs (PLR) of the Directorate for Geosciences and the Division of Physics of the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences are currently preparing the program solicitation. This solicitation is expected to lead to the award of a five- to ten-year cooperative agreement for the management and operation of ICNO following the end of the current cooperative agreement on September 30, 2015.

This letter provides general information regarding the upcoming competition and invites potential proposing organizations to contact NSF representatives to identify information they believe is needed for proposal preparation.

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Enabling Discovery through GEnomic Tools (EDGE)
National Science Foundation

Application due: Feb. 12, 2019

The Division of Integrative Organismal Systems (IOS) recognizes that a lack of methods for analysis of gene function represents an obstacle to progress in a range of diverse non-model organisms. These organisms are important for understanding numerous basic science questions in organismal biology as funded through the Division's core programs. Enabling Discovery through Genomic Tools (EDGE) is designed to provide support for development of tools, approaches and infrastructure necessary for direct tests of cause and effect hypotheses between gene function and phenotypes in diverse plants, animals, microbes, viruses and fungi for which these methods are presently unavailable.

To meet the goal of catalyzing communities to enable direct tests of cause-and-effect hypotheses about genes and phenotypes in organisms for which such tools and infrastructure are presently lacking, EDGE proposals must include training and rapid dissemination plans enabling larger communities of investigators to utilize the newly-developed tools quickly, thereby catalyzing an increase in the capacity of research communities to test cause-and-effect hypotheses about genes and phenotypes in organisms for which such tools and infrastructure are presently lacking.

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Spectrum Efficiency, Energy Efficiency, and Security (SpecEES): Enabling Spectrum for All
National Science Foundation

Application due: Feb. 13, 2019

The National Science Foundation's Directorates for Engineering (ENG) and Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) are coordinating efforts to identify bold new concepts to significantly improve the efficiency of radio spectrum utilization while addressing new challenges in energy efficiency and security, thus enabling spectrum access for all users and devices, and allowing traditionally underserved Americans to benefit from wireless-enabled goods and services. The SpecEES program solicitation (pronounced "SpecEase") seeks to fund innovative collaborative team research that transcends the traditional boundaries of existing programs.

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Navigating the New Arctic (NNA)
National Science Foundation

Application due: Feb. 14, 2019

In 2016, the National Science Foundation (NSF) unveiled a set of Big Ideas, 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering. The Big Ideas represent unique opportunities to position our Nation at the cutting edge of global science and engineering leadership by bringing together diverse disciplinary perspectives to support convergence research. As such, when responding to this solicitation, even though proposals must be submitted to the Directorate for Geosciences, once received, the proposals will be managed by a cross-disciplinary team of NSF Program Directors.

Arctic temperatures are warming faster than nearly everywhere else on Earth, with some models predicting that continued warming could produce an ice-free Arctic Ocean by mid-century. The rapid and wide-scale changes occurring in response to this warming portend new opportunities and unprecedented risks to natural systems; social and cultural systems; economic, political and legal systems; and built environments of the Arctic and across the globe. The lack of scientific observations and the prevalence of interdependent social, natural, and built systems in the Arctic make it challenging to predict the region's future. Understanding and adapting to a changing Arctic will require creative new directions for Arctic-specific research, education, workforce development, and leveraging of science, engineering, and technology advances from outside the Arctic.

Navigating the New Arctic (NNA), one of the 10 Big Ideas, embodies the NSF forward-looking response to these profound challenges. NNA seeks innovations in Arctic observational networks and fundamental convergence research across the social, natural, environmental, and computing and information sciences, and engineering that address the intersection of natural, social, and built systems. NNA promotes initiatives that empower new research communities, diversifies the next generation of Arctic researchers, integrates the co-production of knowledge, and engages partnerships, particularly among international stakeholders. NNA also strongly encourages projects that include or focus on advancing STEM education and workforce development objectives on the scientific themes described below.

Major goals of the NSF NNA Big Idea include:

  • Improved understanding of Arctic change and its local and global effects that capitalize on innovative and optimized observation infrastructure, advances in understanding of fundamental processes, and new approaches to modeling interactions among the natural environment, built environment, and social systems.

  • New enhanced research communities that are diverse, integrative, and well-positioned to carry out productive research at the intersections of Arctic natural and built environments and social systems.

  • Research outcomes that inform U.S. national security and economic development needs and enable resilient, sustainable Arctic communities.

This solicitation requests proposals that fall within two tracks. Track 1 supports research activities, while Track 2 is dedicated to planning grants to develop convergence research teams to tackle projects of larger scope in the future. This solicitation is the first of what is envisioned to be at least a five-year agency-wide program to support the research needed to inform decisions about the economy, security, and resilience of the Nation, the larger region, and the globe with respect to Arctic change. NSF anticipates that future calls will further define larger scope, with the potential to include projects up to the scale of centers and/or consortia.

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Important Notice: Resumption of Operations at the National Science Foundation
National Science Foundation

Jan. 28, 2019

A Resumption of Operations at NSF page has been developed that includes Important Notice No. 145, Resumption of Operations at the National Science Foundation, dated January 28, 2019, as well as supplemental guidance that addresses grant and cooperative agreement-related policy and systems issues. This page will continue to be updated as new information becomes available.

Click on the program link below to access the webpage.

Policy-related questions regarding resumption of operations at NSF may be addressed to policy@nsf.gov.

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NSF Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) Program
National Science Foundation

White Paper due to Department Head or Dean: Aug. 20, 2018
Full Application due to Agency: Jan. 22, 2019 (NSF grant); Jan. 1, 2019 (Murdock grant for possible matching funds)

This announcement is to alert PIs that only one submission slot remains for the NSF MRI Program Track 1 (proposals requesting NSF funds from $100,000 to $999,999).  This MRI proposal may request support for either the acquisition or the development of a research instrument.

Interested PIs should submit a white paper outlining their equipment/instrumentation needs to their department head or dean by Monday, August 20, 2018 (extended deadline). Please note that equipment purchased with these grant funds is intended to be an institutional piece of equipment and should advance the research mission of MSU.

Note:  MSU has traditionally paired the NSF MRI with the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Equipment grant due to the matching funds requirement for each opportunity. Due to several factors, this pairing is a possibility, not a guarantee. Also, the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust supports only the acquisition of equipment, not development.

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NSF/CASIS Collaboration on Tissue Engineering and Mechanobiology on the International Space Station (ISS) to Benefit Life on Earth
National Science Foundation

Application due: Feb. 15, 2019

The Divisions of Chemical, Bioengineering and Environmental Transport (CBET) and Civil, Mechanical, and Manufacturing Infrastructure (CMMI) in the Engineering Directorate of the National Science Foundation (NSF) are partnering with The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) to solicit research projects in the general fields of tissue engineering and mechanobiology that can utilize the International Space Station (ISS) National Lab to conduct research that will benefit life on Earth. U.S. entities including academic investigators, non-profit independent research laboratories and academic-commercial teams are eligible to apply.

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Algorithms for Threat Detection (ATD)
National Science Foundation

Application due: Feb. 19, 2019

The Algorithms for Threat Detection (ATD) program will support research projects to develop the next generation of mathematical and statistical algorithms for analysis of large spatiotemporal datasets with application to quantitative models of human dynamics. The program is a partnership between the Division of Mathematical Sciences (DMS) at the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGA).

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National Robotics Initiative 2.0: Ubiquitous Collaborative Robots (NRI-2.0)
National Science Foundation

Application due: Feb. 19, 2019

The NRI-2.0 program builds upon the original National Robotics Initiative (NRI) program to support fundamental research in the United States that will accelerate the development and use of collaborative robots (co-robots) that work beside or cooperatively with people. The focus of the NRI-2.0 program is on ubiquity, which in this context means seamless integration of co-robots to assist humans in every aspect of life.

The program supports four main research thrusts that are envisioned to advance the goal of ubiquitous co-robots: scalability, customizability, lowering barriers to entry, and societal impact.

Topics addressing scalability include how robots can collaborate effectively with multiple humans or other robots; how robots can perceive, plan, act, and learn in uncertain, real-world environments, especially in a distributed fashion; and how to facilitate large-scale, safe, robust and reliable operation of robots in complex environments. Customizability includes how to enable co-robots to adapt to specific tasks, environments, or people, with minimal modification to hardware and software; how robots can personalize their interactions with people; and how robots can communicate naturally with humans, both verbally and non-verbally.

Topics in lowering barriers to entry should focus on lowering the barriers for conducting fundamental robotics research and research on integrated robotics application. This may include development of open-source co-robot hardware and software, as well as widely-accessible testbeds. Outreach or using robots in educational programs do not, by themselves, lower the barriers to entry for robotics research. Topics in societal impact include fundamental research to establish and infuse robotics into educational curricula, advance the robotics workforce through education pathways, and explore the social, economic, ethical, and legal implications of our future with ubiquitous collaborative robots.

Collaboration between academic, industry, non-profit, and other organizations is encouraged to establish better linkages between fundamental science and engineering and technology development, deployment, and use.

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Centers for Chemical Innovation (CCI): Phase I Awards
National Science Foundation

Preliminary Proposal due: Aug. 14, 2018
Full Proposal due (by invitation only): Feb. 20, 2019

The Centers for Chemical Innovation (CCI) Program supports research centers focused on major, long-term fundamental chemical research challenges. CCIs that address these challenges will produce transformative research, lead to innovation, and attract broad scientific and public interest. CCIs are agile structures that can respond rapidly to emerging opportunities through enhanced collaborations. CCIs integrate research, innovation, education, broadening participation, and informal science communication.

The FY 2019 Phase I CCI competition is open to projects in all fields supported by the Division of Chemistry, and must have scientific focus and the potential for transformative impact in chemistry. NSF Chemistry particularly encourages fundamental chemistry projects related to one or more of NSF's 10 Big Ideas.

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CISE Community Research Infrastructure (CCRI)
National Science Foundation

Agency LOI due: Jan. 8, 2019
Full Application due: Feb. 20, 2019

The Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) Community Research Infrastructure (CCRI) program drives discovery and learning in the core CISE disciplines of the three participating divisions [(Computing and Communication Foundations (CCF), Computer and Network Systems (CNS), and Information and Intelligent Systems (IIS)] by funding the creation and enhancement of world-class research infrastructure. This research infrastructure will specifically support diverse communities of CISE researchers pursuing focused research agendas in computer and information science and engineering.

This support involves developing the accompanying user services and engagement needed to attract, nurture, and grow a robust research community that is actively involved in determining directions for the infrastructure as well as management of the infrastructure. This should lead to infrastructure that can be sustained through community involvement and community leadership, and that will enable advances not possible with existing research infrastructure. Further, through the CCRI program, CISE seeks to ensure that researchers from a diverse range of academic institutions, including minority-serving and predominantly undergraduate institutions, as well as researchers from non-profit, non-academic organizations, have access to such infrastructure.

The CCRI program supports two classes of awards:

  • New awards support the creation of new CISE community research infrastructure with integrated tools, resources, user services, and community outreach to enable innovative CISE research opportunities to advance the frontiers of the CISE core research areas. The New award class includes Grand Ensemble (Grand), Medium Ensemble (Medium), and Planning awards.
  • Enhance/sustain (ENS) awards support the enhancement and sustainment of an existing CISE community infrastructure to enable world-class CISE research opportunities for broad-based communities of CISE researchers that extend well beyond the awardee organization(s).

Each CCRI New or ENS award may support the operation of such infrastructure, ensuring that the awardee organization(s) is (are) well positioned to provide a high quality of service to CISE community researchers expected to use the infrastructure to realize their research goals.

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Frontier Research in Earth Sciences (FRES)
National Science Foundation

Application due: Feb. 20, 2019

The FRES program will support research in Earth systems from its core through the critical zone. The project may focus on all or part of the surface, continental lithospheric, and deeper Earth systems over the entire range of temporal and spatial scales. FRES projects will typically have a larger scientific scope and budget than those considered for funding by core programs in the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR).

FRES projects may be interdisciplinary studies that do not fit well within the core programs or cannot be routinely managed by sharing between core programs. Innovative proposals within a single area with results that will have broad relevance to Earth Science research are also encouraged. Investigations may employ any combination of field, laboratory, and computational studies with observational, theoretical, or experimental approaches. Projects should be focused on topics that meet the guidelines for research funded by the Division of Earth Sciences.

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Macrosystems Biology and NEON-Enabled Science (MSB-NES): Research on Biological Systems at Regional to Continental Scales
National Science Foundation

Application due: Feb. 25, 2019

The Macrosystems Biology and NEON-Enabled Science (MSB-NES): Research on Biological Systems at Regional to Continental Scales program will support quantitative, interdisciplinary, systems-oriented research on biosphere processes and their complex interactions with climate, land use, and invasive species at regional to continental scales as well as training activities to enable groups to conduct Macrosystems Biology and NEON-Enabled Science research.

Proposers are encouraged to use NEON resources, and proposals for substantive and innovative NEON-enabled research will be prioritized for funding. Substantive NEON-enabled projects rely on data and/or samples collected by NEON, co-locate research activities at NEON sites, and/or develop tools that will explicitly enhance the processing, use, and/or analysis of NEON data or collections within the context of Macrosystems Biology research questions.

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Resource Implementations for Data Intensive Research in the Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (RIDIR)
National Science Foundation

Application due: Feb. 25, 2019

As part of NSF's Harnessing the Data Revolution (HDR), the Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE) seeks to develop user-friendly large-scale next-generation data resources and relevant analytic techniques to advance fundamental research in SBE areas of study. Successful proposals will, within the financial resources provided by the award, construct such databases and/or relevant analytic techniques and produce a finished product that will enable new types of data-intensive research. The databases or techniques should have significant impacts, either across multiple fields or within broad disciplinary areas, by enabling new types of data-intensive research in the SBE sciences.

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Integrative Strategies for Understanding Neural and Cognitive Systems (NCS): Foundations
National Science Foundation

Agency LOI due: Jan. 8, 2019
Full Proposal due: Feb. 26, 2019

The complexities of brain and behavior pose fundamental questions in many areas of science and engineering, drawing intense interest across a broad spectrum of disciplinary perspectives while eluding explanation by any one of them. Rapid advances within and across disciplines are leading to an increasingly interwoven fabric of theories, models, empirical methods and findings, and educational approaches, opening new opportunities to understand complex aspects of neural and cognitive systems through integrative multidisciplinary approaches.

This program calls for innovative, convergent, boundary-crossing proposals that can best capture those opportunities and map out new research frontiers. NSF seeks proposals that are bold and risky, and transcend the perspectives and approaches typical of disciplinary research efforts. This cross-directorate program is one element of NSF's broader effort directed at Understanding the Brain, a multi-year activity that includes NSF's participation in the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative (https://www.nsf.gov/brain/). NSF envisions a connected portfolio of transformative, integrative projects that create synergistic links across investigators and communities, yielding novel ways of tackling the challenges of understanding the brain in action and in context.

The program focuses on four aspects of neural and cognitive systems that are current targets of converging interdisciplinary interests. NCS projects must advance the foundations of one or more of these focus areas, as described further within the solicitation:

  1. Neuroengineering and Brain-Inspired Concepts and Designs
  2. Individuality and Variation
  3. Cognitive and Neural Processes in Realistic, Complex Environments
  4. Data-Intensive Neuroscience and Cognitive Science

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Accelerating Research through International Network-to-Network Collaborations (AccelNet)
National Science Foundation

Agency LOI due: Dec. 21, 2018
Full Proposal due: Feb. 28, 2019

The goals of the Accelerating Research through International Network-to-Network Collaborations (AccelNet) program are to accelerate the process of scientific discovery and prepare the next generation of U.S. researchers for multiteam international collaborations. The AccelNet program supports strategic linkages among U.S. research networks and complementary networks abroad that will leverage research and educational resources to tackle grand scientific challenges that require significant coordinated international efforts. The program seeks to foster high-impact science and engineering by providing opportunities to create new collaborations and new combinations of resources and ideas among linked global networks.

This solicitation invites proposals for the creation of international networks of networks in research areas aligned either with one of the NSF Big Ideas or a community-identified scientific challenge with international dimensions. AccelNet awards are meant to support the connections among research networks, rather than supporting fundamental research as the primary activity. Each network of networks is expected to engage in innovative collaborative activities that promote synergy of efforts across the networks and provide professional development for students, postdoctoral scholars, and early-career researchers. There are two proposal categories covered by this solicitation: Catalytic and Full-Scale Implementation.

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Dimensions of Biodiversity FY2019
National Science Foundation

Application due: Feb. 28, 2019

Despite centuries of discovery, most of our planet's biodiversity remains unknown. The scale of Earth's unknown diversity is especially troubling given the rapid and permanent loss of biodiversity across the globe. The goal of the Dimensions of Biodiversity campaign is to transform how we describe and understand the scope and role of life on Earth.

This campaign promotes novel integrative approaches to fill the most substantial gaps in our understanding of the diversity of life on Earth. It takes a broad view of biodiversity, and focuses on the intersection of genetic, phylogenetic, and functional dimensions of biodiversity. Successful proposals must integrate these three dimensions to understand interactions among them. While this focus complements several core programs in BIO, it differs by requiring that multiple dimensions of biodiversity be addressed simultaneously, in novel ways, to understand their synergistic roles in critical ecological and evolutionary processes, especially pertaining to the mechanisms driving the origin, maintenance, and functional roles of biodiversity.

The 2019 Dimensions of Biodiversity program is restricted to projects supported by international partnerships with the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), the São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) of Brazil, and the National Research Foundation (NRF) of South Africa. Proposals are to be submitted jointly, with the US PIs submitting to NSF and the collaborating Chinese, Brazilian, or South African PIs submitting to their appropriate national funding agencies.

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PFE: Research Initiation in Engineering Formation (PFE: RIEF)
National Science Foundation

Application due: Feb. 28, 2019

The PFE: Research Initiation in Engineering Formation (PFE: RIEF) program has two goals: 1) Support research in the Professional Formation of Engineers (PFE), and 2) Increase the community of researchers conducting PFE research. PIs are expected to have little or no experience conducting social science research. PFE: RIEF is not intended for established researchers in engineering education or other social science fields to initiate new projects.

The NSF Engineering (ENG) Directorate has launched a multi-year initiative, the Professional Formation of Engineers, to create and support an innovative and inclusive engineering profession for the 21st Century. Professional Formation of Engineers (PFE) refers to the formal and informal education and value systems by which people become engineers. It also includes the ethical responsibility of practicing engineers to sustain and grow the profession. The engineering profession must be responsive to national priorities, grand challenges, and dynamic workforce needs; it must be equally open and accessible to all.

Engineering faculty possess both deep technical expertise in their engineering discipline and the primary responsibility for the process of professional formation of future engineers. As such, engineering faculty are in a unique position to help address critical challenges in engineering formation. The Professional Formation of Engineers: Research Initiation in Engineering Formation (PFE: RIEF) program enables engineering faculty who are renowned for teaching, mentoring, or leading educational reform efforts on their campus to develop expertise in conducting engineering education research.

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Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier: Core Research (FW-HTF)
National Science Foundation

Application due: Mar. 6, 2019

In 2016, the National Science Foundation (NSF) unveiled a set of "Big Ideas," 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering. The Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier (FW-HTF), one of the Big Ideas, is one mechanism by which NSF is responding to the challenges and opportunities for the future of jobs and work. The overarching vision is to support convergent research to understand and develop the human-technology partnership, design new technologies to augment human performance, illuminate the emerging socio-technological landscape, understand the risks and benefits of new technologies, understand and influence the impact of artificial intelligence on workers and work, and foster lifelong and pervasive learning.

The specific objectives of the Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier program are (1) to facilitate convergent research that employs the joint perspectives, methods, and knowledge of computer science, engineering, learning sciences, research on education and workforce training, and social, behavioral, and economic sciences; (2) to encourage the development of a research community dedicated to designing intelligent technologies and work organization and modes inspired by their positive impact on individual workers, the work at hand, the way people learn and adapt to technological change, creative and supportive workplaces (including remote locations, homes, classrooms, or virtual spaces), and benefits for social, economic, and environmental systems at different scales; (3) to promote deeper basic understanding of the interdependent human-technology partnership to advance societal needs by advancing design of intelligent work technologies that operate in harmony with human workers, including consideration of how adults learn the new skills needed to interact with these technologies in the workplace, and by enabling broad workforce participation, including improving accessibility for those challenged by physical or cognitive impairment; and (4) to understand, anticipate, and explore ways of mitigating potential risks arising from future work at the human-technology frontier.

A proposal for a research grant in this program must focus on advancing fundamental understanding of future work, and potential improvements to work, workplaces, workforce preparation, or work outcomes for workers and society. It must be convergent research that addresses the technological as well as the human and societal dimensions and potential impact of future work, and in doing so, make significant contributions to both intellectual merit and broader impact. Achieving this goal requires integration and convergence of disciplines across computer science, engineering, learning sciences, research on education and workforce training, and social, behavioral, and economic sciences. A convergent perspective is essential to understand and shape long-term social and economic drivers, so that advanced intelligent technology will strengthen the social fabric. A convergent perspective also provides insights into education and re-skilling, so that the benefits of emerging technology can be conferred upon all citizens.

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Mathematical Sciences Research Institutes
National Science Foundation

Agency LOI due: Dec. 14, 2018
Full Application due: Mar. 14, 2019

Mathematical Sciences Research Institutes are national resources that aim to advance research in the mathematical sciences through programs supporting discovery and dissemination of knowledge in mathematics and statistics and enhancing connections to related fields in which the mathematical sciences can play important roles. Institute activities help focus the attention of some of the best mathematical minds on problems of particular importance and timeliness. Institutes are also community resources that involve a broad segment of U.S.-based mathematical sciences researchers in their activities.

The goals of the Mathematical Sciences Research Institutes program include advancing research in the mathematical sciences, increasing the impact of the mathematical sciences in other disciplines, and expanding the talent base engaged in mathematical research in the United States.

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Distributed Array of Small Instruments (DASI)
National Science Foundation

Application due: Apr. 19, 2019

The Distributed Arrays of Small Instruments (DASI) solicitation is designed to address the increasing need for high spatial and temporal resolution measurements to determine the local, regional, and global scale processes that are essential for addressing the fundamental questions in solar and space physics.

This solicitation will be formally divided into two tracks: 1) development of instrumentation for future deployment in arrays and 2) deployment and operation of existing instruments in distributed arrays. This DASI solicitation emphasizes both strong scientific merit and a well-developed plan for student training and involvement of a diverse workforce.

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Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation 2019 (EFRI-2019)
National Science Foundation

Agency LOI due: Nov. 29, 2018
Preliminary Proposal due: Jan. 7, 2019
Full Proposal due: Apr. 25, 2019

The Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI) program of the NSF Directorate for Engineering (ENG) serves a critical role in helping ENG focus on important emerging areas in a timely manner. This solicitation is a funding opportunity for interdisciplinary teams of researchers to embark on rapidly advancing frontiers of fundamental engineering research. For this solicitation, we will consider proposals that aim to investigate emerging frontiers in one of the following two research areas:

  • Chromatin and Epigenetic Engineering (CEE)
  • Continuum, Compliant, and Configurable Soft Robotics Engineering (C3 SoRo)

This solicitation will be coordinated with the Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO) and the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE).

EFRI seeks proposals with transformative ideas that represent an opportunity for a significant shift in fundamental engineering knowledge with a strong potential for long term impact on national needs or a grand challenge. The proposals must also meet the detailed requirements delineated in this solicitation.

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Harnessing the Data Revolution: Transdisciplinary Research in Principles of Data Science Phase I
National Science Foundation

Agency LOI due: Mar. 25, 2019
Full Application due: May 8, 2019

In 2016, the National Science Foundation (NSF) unveiled a set of Big Ideas, 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering. The Big Ideas represent unique opportunities to position our Nation at the cutting edge of global science and engineering leadership by bringing together diverse disciplinary perspectives to support convergence research.

NSF\'s Harnessing the Data Revolution (HDR) Big Idea is a national-scale activity to enable new modes of data-driven discovery that will allow fundamental questions to be asked and answered at the frontiers of science and engineering. Through this NSF-wide activity, HDR will generate new knowledge and understanding, and accelerate discovery and innovation.

The HDR vision is realized through an interrelated set of efforts in:

  • Foundations of data science;

  • Algorithms and systems for data science;

  • Data-intensive science and engineering;

  • Data cyberinfrastructure; and

  • Education and workforce development.

Each of these efforts is designed to amplify the intrinsically multidisciplinary nature of the emerging field of data science. The HDR Big Idea will establish theoretical, technical, and ethical frameworks that will be applied to tackle data-intensive problems in science and engineering, contributing to data-driven decision-making that impacts society.

Harnessing the Data Revolution: Transdisciplinary Research in Principles of Data Science (HDR TRIPODS) aims to bring together the electrical engineering, mathematics, statistics, and theoretical computer science communities to develop the theoretical foundations of data science through integrated research and training activities. Phase I, described in this solicitation, will support the development of small collaborative Institutes. Phase II (to be described in an anticipated future solicitation, subject to availability of funds) will support a smaller number of larger Institutes, selected from the Phase I Institutes via a second competitive proposal process.

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Understanding the Rules of Life: Building a Synthetic Cell
National Science Foundation

Preliminary Proposal due: Dec. 28, 2018
Full Proposal due: May 13, 2019

In 2016, the National Science Foundation (NSF) unveiled a set of "Big Ideas," 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering (see https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/big_ideas/index.jsp). The Big Ideas represent unique opportunities to position our Nation at the cutting edge of global science and engineering leadership by bringing together diverse disciplinary perspectives to support convergence research. As such, when responding to this solicitation, even though proposals must be submitted to the Division of Emerging Frontiers in the Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO/EF) , once received, the proposals will be managed by a cross-disciplinary team of NSF Program Directors.

This solicitation describes an Ideas Lab on "Building a Synthetic Cell." Ideas Labs are intensive workshops focused on finding innovative solutions to grand challenge problems. The ultimate aim of this Ideas Lab organized by the National Science Foundation is to facilitate the generation and execution of innovative research projects aimed at designing, fabricating, and validating synthetic cells that express specified phenotypes. The aspiration is that mixing researchers who have diverse scientific backgrounds will engender original thinking and innovative approaches that will transform our understanding of cellular processes, the molecular mechanisms that underscore the building and function of systems that reproduce life traits, the self-assembly of life-like systems, soft condensed matter, and the physics and chemistry of life that are needed to design and build cellular components, cells and multicell systems.

The ability to design and manufacture synthetic cells has significant implications for the scientific and economic enterprise of the United States. The synthesis of viable cells from non-living molecules and materials can open the door to the production of functional biomaterials and improved biofuels, large scale chemical synthesis, non-silicon-based computing, novel soil engineering, and medical and pharmaceutical advances, to name just a few possibilities. The study of synthetic cells, and of the processes used in their creation, can also provide a window on the origin and evolution of life on Earth and, potentially, provide insight into extraterrestrial life.

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Mid-Scale Research Infrastructure-1 (Mid-Scale RI-1)
National Science Foundation

Preliminary Proposal due: Feb. 19, 2019
Full Proposal due (by invitation only): May 20, 2019

NSF-supported science and engineering research increasingly relies on cutting-edge infrastructure. With its Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) program and Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction (MREFC) projects, NSF supports infrastructure projects at the lower and higher ends of infrastructure scales across science and engineering research disciplines. The Mid-Scale Research Infrastructure Big Idea is intended to provide NSF with an agile, Foundation-wide process to fund experimental research capabilities in the mid-scale range between the MRI and MREFC thresholds.

Within Mid-Scale RI-1, proposers may submit two types of projects, Implementation and Design. Design and Implementation projects may comprise any combination of equipment, infrastructure, computational hardware and software, and necessary commissioning. Design includes planning (preliminary and final design) of research infrastructure with an anticipated total project cost that is appropriate for future Mid-Scale RI-1, Mid-Scale RI-2 or MREFC-class investments. Mid-Scale RI-1 uses an inclusive definition of implementation, which can include traditional stand-alone construction or acquisition and can include a degree of advanced development leading immediately to final system acquisition and/or construction.

Mid-Scale RI-1 Implementation projects may have a total project cost ranging from $6 million up to below $20 million. Projects must directly enable advances in fundamental science, engineering or science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education research in one or more of the research domains supported by NSF Implementation projects may support new or upgraded research infrastructure. Only Mid-Scale RI-1 Design projects may request less than $6 million, with a minimum request of $600,000 and a maximum request below $20 million as needed to prepare for a future mid-scale or larger infrastructure implementation project. (Successful award of a Mid-Scale RI-1 design project does not imply NSF commitment to future implementation of that project.)

Note: Mid-Scale research infrastructure projects beyond the Mid-Scale RI-1 program limit are anticipated to be separately solicited by a Mid-Scale RI-2 program.

Mid-Scale RI-1 emphasizes strong scientific merit and response to an identified need of the research community. Demonstrated technical and managerial experience is required for both design and implementation projects, as are well-developed plans for student training and the involvement of a diverse workforce in all aspects of mid-scale activities.

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Enabling Quantum Leap: Quantum Idea Incubator for Transformational Advances in Quantum Systems
National Science Foundation

Agency LOI due: Jan. 7, 2019
Preliminary Proposal due: Feb. 21, 2019
Full Proposal due: May 24, 2019

In 2016, the National Science Foundation (NSF) unveiled a set of "Big Ideas," 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering.

The Quantum Idea Incubator for Transformational Advances in Quantum Systems (QII - TAQS) program is designed to support interdisciplinary teams that will explore highly innovative, original, and potentially transformative ideas for developing and applying quantum science, quantum computing, and quantum engineering. Proposals with the potential to deliver new concepts, new platforms, and/or new approaches that will accelerate the science, computing, and engineering of quantum technologies are encouraged. Breakthroughs in quantum sensing, quantum communications, quantum simulations, or quantum computing systems are anticipated. This Quantum Idea Incubator solicitation aims to support the process of translating such ideas into reality.

This solicitation calls for proposals focused on interdisciplinary research that includes elements from the following thrust areas: (i) fundamental science such as, but not limited to, physics, chemistry, materials science, mathematics, biology, or geoscience, as well as foundational concepts and techniques in quantum information science and engineering; (ii) communication, computation, and modeling; and (iii) devices and engineered systems. Proposals must articulate how the project leverages and/or promotes advances in knowledge in the selected thrust areas. Proposals should be innovative and must focus on quantum functionality and must result in experimental demonstrations and/or transformative advances towards quantum systems and/or proof-of-concept validations.

Competitive proposals will come from an interdisciplinary research team led by at least three investigators who collectively contribute synergistic expertise from one or more engineering domains, from mathematics, computational and/or computer and information science, and from one or more physical, chemical, biological, or materials science domains. Proposals will be judged on how likely the integrated effort is to lead to transformative advances in quantum systems. Both fundamental and applied topics are encouraged.

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Harnessing the Data Revolution (HDR): Institutes for Data-Intensive Research in Science and Engineering - Ideas Labs (I-DIRSE-IL)
National Science Foundation

Preliminary Proposal due: Jan. 28, 2019
Full Proposal due: June 19, 2019

In 2016, the National Science Foundation (NSF) unveiled a set of "Big Ideas," 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering. The Big Ideas represent unique opportunities to position our Nation at the cutting edge of global science and engineering leadership by bringing together diverse disciplinary perspectives to support convergence research.

NSF's Harnessing the Data Revolution (HDR) Big Idea is a national-scale activity to enable new modes of data-driven discovery that will allow fundamental questions to be asked and answered at the frontiers of science and engineering. Through this NSF-wide activity, HDR will generate new knowledge and understanding, and accelerate discovery and innovation. The HDR vision is realized through an interrelated set of efforts in:

  • Foundations of data science;
  • Algorithms and systems for data science;
  • Data-intensive science and engineering;
  • Data cyberinfrastructure; and
  • Education and workforce development.

Each of these efforts is designed to amplify the intrinsically multidisciplinary nature of the emerging field of data science. The HDR Big Idea will establish theoretical, technical, and ethical frameworks that will be applied to tackle data-intensive problems in science and engineering, contributing to data-driven decision-making that impacts society.

This solicitation describes one or more Ideas Lab(s) on Data-Intensive Research in Science and Engineering (DIRSE) as part of the HDR Institutes activity.These Ideas Labs represent one path of a conceptualization phase aimed at developing Institutes as part of the NSF investment in the HDR Big Idea.

The HDR Institutes activity seeks to create an integrated fabric of interrelated institutes that can accelerate discovery and innovation in multiple areas of data-intensive science and engineering. The HDR Institutes will achieve this by harnessing diverse data sources and developing and applying new methodologies, technologies, and infrastructure for data management and analysis. The HDR Institutes will support convergence between science and engineering research communities as well as expertise in data science foundations, systems, applications, and cyberinfrastructure. In addition, the HDR Institutes will enable breakthroughs in science and engineering through collaborative, co-designed programs to formulate innovative data-intensive approaches to address critical national challenges.

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Mid-Scale Research Infrastructure-2 (Mid-Scale RI-2)
National Science Foundation

Agency LOI due: Feb. 8, 2019
Preliminary Proposal due: Mar. 11, 2019
Full Proposal due (by invitation only): Aug. 2, 2019

In 2016, the National Science Foundation (NSF) unveiled a set of "Big Ideas," 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering. The Big Ideas represent unique opportunities to position our Nation at the cutting edge of global science and engineering leadership by bringing together diverse disciplinary perspectives to support convergence research. As such, when responding to this solicitation, even though proposals must be submitted to the Office of Integrative Activities, once received, the proposals will be managed by a cross-disciplinary team of NSF Program Directors.

The need for a well-defined NSF mid-scale funding program has been recognized by stakeholders in the scientific community and by Congress in the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act (AICA) of 2017. As one of four "process ideas" in the NSF suite of 10 Big Ideas, the Mid-scale Research Infrastructure Program is aimed at transforming scientific and engineering research fields as well as science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education research fields by making available new capabilities, while simultaneously training early-career researchers in the development, design, and construction of cutting-edge infrastructure.

The NSF Mid-scale Research Infrastructure-2 Program (Mid-scale RI-2) supports implementation of projects that comprise any combination of equipment, instrumentation, computational hardware and software, and the necessary commissioning and human capital in support of implementation of the same. The total cost for Mid-scale RI-2 projects ranges from $20 million to below the minimum award funded by the Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction (MREFC) Program, currently $70 million. Mid-scale RI-2 projects will directly enable advances in any of the research domains supported by NSF, including STEM education. Projects may also include upgrades to existing research infrastructure.

The Mid-scale RI-2 Program emphasizes strong scientific merit and response to an identified need of the research community, technical and managerial readiness for implementation, and a well-developed plan for student training and involvement of a diverse workforce in mid-scale facility development, and/or associated data management.

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Research on Integrated Photonics Utilizing AIM Photonics Capabilities
National Science Foundation

AIM Photonics Proposal due: Accepted anytime
CAREER Proposal due: July 2019

The purpose of this funding opportunity is to encourage innovative exploratory and translational research by academic researchers in all aspects of integrated photonics that utilize the current silicon photonics capabilities resident in AIM Photonics.

The American Institute of Manufacturing of Integrated Photonics (AIM) was established in July 2015 by the U.S. government under Department of Defense (DoD) leadership as a manufacturing innovation institute to advance integrated photonics. The Institute's goal is to emulate the dramatic successes experienced by the semiconductor industry over the past 40 years and transition key lessons, processes, and approaches to the photonic integrated circuit (PIC) industry.

Research projects utilizing the AIM Photonics fabrication process technologies via multi-project wafer runs should have an objective to bring a specific innovation to integrated photonics circuits and components or to demonstrate a new approach that uses integrated photonics as its differentiator. Examples of such challenges may include:

  • Research into new applications of PICs that have promise of breakthrough performance due to the use of an integrated photonic component;
  • New devices that are realizable within AIM Photonics standardized integrated silicon photonics processes;
  • PIC implementations that have innovative contributions to advancements of photonics circuits (i.e., low power, greater bandwidths and dynamic ranges, better tolerances, new topologies, etc.);
  • Innovative design approaches and new models of integrated photonics devices/circuits; and
  • Materials and attachment technologies for incorporating integrated photonics into novel packages.

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U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)

Biotechnology Risk Assessment Research Grants Program (BRAG)
U.S. Department of Agriculture

Agency LOI due: Dec. 12, 2018
Full Application due: Feb. 20, 2019

The purpose of the BRAG program is to support the generation of new information that will assist Federal regulatory agencies in making science-based decisions about the effects of introducing into the environment genetically engineered organisms (GE), including plants, microorganisms (such as fungi, bacteria, and viruses), arthropods, fish, birds, mammals, and other animals excluding humans. Investigations of effects on both managed and natural environments are relevant. The BRAG program accomplishes its purpose by providing federal regulatory agencies with scientific information relevant to regulatory issues.

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Secondary Education, Two-Year Postsecondary Education, and Agriculture in the K-12 Classroom Challenge Grants Program (SPECA)
U.S. Department of Agriculture

Application due: Apr. 16, 2019

The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) requests applications for the Secondary Education, Two-Year Postsecondary Education, and Agriculture in the K-12 Classroom Challenge Grants Program (SPECA) for FY2019 to promote and strengthen food, agriculture, natural resource, and human (FANH) science education. The anticipated amount available for grants in FY 2019 is approximately $800,000. This RFA is being released prior to the passage of an appropriations act for FY 2019. Enactment of additional continuing resolutions or an appropriations act may affect the availability or level of funding for this program.

The purpose of the SPECA program is to award grants to:

  • Enhance the quality of K-14 instruction in order to help meet current and future national food, agricultural, natural resources, and human (FANH) sciences workplace needs; and

  • Increase the number and diversity of students who will pursue and complete a 2 or 4-year degree in the food, agricultural, natural resources and human (FANH) sciences.

SPECA-funded projects encourage academic institutions, in partnership with organizations and employers to identify and address challenges facing the FANH sciences education and workforce community. The talent pipeline for the agriculture workforce begins well before college admission and a focus on secondary programs holds tremendous potential to increase not only the number, but the diversity of students entering baccalaureate programs, a requisite for the innovation needed in the FANH sciences.

Accordingly, SPECA-funded project activities shall support the creation, adaptation, and adoption of learning materials and teaching strategies to operationalize what we know about how students learn. SPECA-funded projects shall also focus on imparting both technical knowledge as well as soft skills such as communication, team work, and problem solving, as these are abilities expected by employers.

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Miscellaneous Programs and Announcements

American Heart Association: New Topics and Open Science Policies
American Heart Association

LOI due October 30, 2014
Full submission deadline TBA

REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS/NEW TOPICS: 

Network Topic Announcement

The Strategically Focused Research Network will focus on Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease.

The AHA is interested in the science community exploring all aspects of disparities in cardiovascular disease, which can assist the AHA in reaching its 2020 Goals and overall mission of building healthier lives free of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

A Network is comprised of three to four institutions, or Centers, working on three projects each that are focused on one strategic area.

To that end, the AHA pursues research from the basic, clinical and population sciences. This RFA will require that each submission have an overall application from the Center Director, as well as three proposals from project Principal Investigators in this specific area:

  • One proposal addressing basic science discovery in Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease
  • One proposal addressing clinical science discovery in Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease
  • One proposal addressing population science discovery in Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease 
A Center application can comprise projects from more than one institution. The sponsoring institution will be determined by where the Center Director is located and will be charged with oversight and financial responsibilities of the Center as a whole. Applications should convey how these different areas of science will be integrated, both in their scientific discoveries and through joint team communication and integration. 

Institutions are limited to one Center application per location, however individuals at said institution who are not participating in said institution's Center application, may indeed participate in another Center's application.

Offered by:
 AHA National Research Program 

More information will be announced with specific deadlines. For now, use this high level timeline as a guide:  
  • March 2014 - Topics announced to the community via AHA Research Website with timelines
  • Jan/Feb 2015 - Applications for Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease SFRN due
  • June 2015 -  Awardees for Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease SFRN Announced
Please come back and visit this page in mid-September for the full Request for Applications for the Strategically Focused Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease Research Network.
 

POLICY UPDATES: 

AHA OPEN SCIENCE POLICIES ARE NOW IN EFFECT
New AHA Open Science policies will go into effect with applications due in July 2014 and new awards beginning January 2015. 

AHA's public access policy
The AHA requires that all journal articles resulting from AHA funding should be made freely available in PubMed Central within 12 months of publication.

AHA's open data policy
The AHA requires grant applicants to include a data sharing plan as part of the application process. Any data that is needed for independent verification of research results must be made freely and publically available within 12 months of the end of the funding period (and any no-cost extension).

Specific early career awards are currently exempt from this requirement (Undergraduate Fellowships, Medical Student Research Fellowships, Predoctoral Fellowships, Mentor/AHA Mentee Awards, Postdoctoral Fellowships, and Mentored Clinical & Population Research Awards).

View more information about AHA Open Science policies and answers to Frequently Asked Questions.  

 

 

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Autism Speaks: Suzanne and Bob Wright Trailblazer Award

Letter of intent Deadline: accepted anytime

The Trailblazer Award mechanism supports highly novel "out of the box" autism-relevant research that open new avenues to understanding the causes, diagnosis, subtyping, prevention, treatments, and cure of autism spectrum disorders. The Trailblazer Award mechanism is designed to fund small investigator-initiated high risk/high impact projects that are potentially transformative, paradigm shifting, and/or will overcome significant roadblocks in autism research within a 12 month period.

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Charitable Giving Program
Community Works

Ongoing

The charitable programs are among the ways that NorthWestern Energy participates as an active participant in the communities where they do business. Donations will generally be made to those non-profit groups that have the greatest opportunity for positively affecting the communities served by NorthWestern Energy and are focused in one of the following categories: 

- Education: Education remains a primary focus of the company. Donations to education will primarily be made through university system foundations, scholarship programs, and employee matching gifts. Donations will also be made in support of local colleges, and special primary and secondary education programs in the fields of math, science and youth leadership. 

- Health and Human Services: Donations will be considered for organizations serving human needs such as the United Way, youth homes and special community health and safety needs. Donations will generally not be made to national health organizations or for medical equipment or research funds. 

- Civic & Community: Donations will be considered for civic improvment, special events, and youth and senior citizen organizations. 

- Culture & The Arts: Donations will be considered for local museums, libraries, cultural centers, and the performing arts. 

- Resource Conservation: Donations will be considered in the areas of habitat preservation, and fish and wildlife protection. 

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Conferences and Workshops in the Mathematical Sciences
National Science Foundation

Proposals accepted anytime

IMPORTANT INFORMATION AND REVISION NOTES

Proposals must be submitted to the appropriate DMS disciplinary program subject to the lead-time requirements specified by that program. For more information about the required lead time, refer to the particular disciplinary program web page listed on the DMS home page.

This revision clarifies the expectations for DMS support of international group travel.

Any proposal submitted in response to this solicitation should be submitted in accordance with the revised NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) (NSF 16-1), which is effective for proposals submitted, or due, on or after January 25, 2016.

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Department of Defense / CDMRP
Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs

Deadlines: see program pre-announcements

The Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) Defense Appropriations Act provides research funding for the peer reviewed programs managed by the Department of Defense (DOD) office of Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP).

This e-mail is to notify the research community of the recently released funding opportunities from the following programs: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Research Program (DMDRP), Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP), Neurofibromatosis Research Program (NFRP), Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP).

Detailed descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, evaluation criteria, and submission requirements can be found in the respective Program Announcements. Each Program Announcement is available electronically for downloading from the Grants.gov website (http://www.grants.gov), the CDMRP website (http://cdmrp.army.mil/funding/prgdefault.shtml) and the electronic Biomedical Research Application Portal (eBRAP) (https://eBRAP.org).

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Research Program (DMDRP)

Investigator-Initiated Research Award

Therapeutic Idea Award

Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP)

Concept Award

Neurofibromatosis Research Program (NFRP)

Clinical Trial Award

Exploration-Hypothesis Development Award

Investigator-Initiated Research Award

New Investigator Award

Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP)

Exploration Hypothesis Development Award

Idea Development Award

Pilot Clinical Trial Award

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Bone Marrow Failure Research Program (BMFRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Multiple Sclerosis Research Program (MSRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program (PRCRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program (PRMRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program (TSCRP)

Descriptions of each of the funding opportunities, eligibility, key mechanism elements, and funding can be found in the respective Program pre-announcement.  FY14 pre-announcements can be found in the CDMRP home page features at http://cdmrp.army.mil

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Ecological Services Program Fiscal Year 2014 Recovery Implementation Fund
Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Ecological Services Program

July 31, 2014

SYNOPSIS:

The FWS Endangered Species Program provides Federal financial assistance on a competitive basis to States, other Federal agencies, landowners, educators, non-profit organizations, researchers, and other partners to secure information about endangered, threatened or candidate species, to aid in the recovery of these species, to avert listing of species pursuant to the Endangered Species Act, and to help conserve the ecosystems upon which these species depend. The FWS and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), which is part of the Department of Commerce's NOAA Fisheries office, share Endangered Species Act responsibilities for several species such as sea turtles. Projects for NMFS-managed species are not included in this funding opportunity.

OBJECTIVES: 

This Recovery Implementation funding opportunity is intended for projects that will contribute to the recovery of FWS-managed endangered and threatened species in the United States, and is limited to projects carrying out actions described in a species approved recovery plan, in the implementation schedule of a species approved recovery plan, actions recommended in a completed 5-year status review of the species or in a spotlight species action plan, or projects documenting species response to climate change. For example: securing scientific information about endangered or threatened species, implementing restoration actions that will lead to delisting of a species, help prevent extinction of a species, or aid in the recovery of a species. Projects that address species response to climate change will receive additional consideration.

Special Instructions: Applicants must contact their regional FWS office to coordinate the letter of intent and application. 

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General Grants
MJ Murdock Charitable Trust

Applications accepted on an ongoing basis.

SYNOPSIS: 

General Grants

The Trust awards grants for projects that are of strategic importance to the organization and consistent with its mission. Awards are made in the following four areas:

Arts and Culture

Performance and visual arts projects that enrich the cultural environment of the region are of interest to the Trust. There is a high value placed on educational outreach efforts.

Education

The Trust considers educational projects offered in both formal and informal settings. Special interest is afforded to private higher education.

Health and Human Services

The Trust is interested in a diverse range of projects to enhance the quality of life in the region. Preventive efforts that address physical, spiritual, social, and psychological needs, especially those focused on youth, are preferred.

Research

Most of the Trust's funding for scientific research is limited to specific organizations and projects. However, the Trust does consider other science-based initiatives.

The Trust makes grants for building the capacity of non-profit groups in these primary ways for the following three types of projects:

Capital

The Trust regularly funds projects that involve construction, renovation, land purchase, and more. Requests for capital projects are preferred once a portion of the funds needed have been secured.

Program

Both new programs and the expansion of existing programs are considered. Requests may be for start-up costs and/or related additional staff members. The Trust prefers to fund these grants on a declining basis over three years (100/67/33 percent).

Equipment

Scientific research instrumentation, technology, and other essential equipment items are often funded. In every case, the Trust requires a cost share of 50 percent or more.

Before proceeding, interested parties should review the Guidelines for Grantseekers to learn more and determine the organization's eligibility and the appropriate nature of the project to the Trust.

 

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MCubed Diamond Program
University of Michigan

SYNOPSIS: 

The MCubed Diamond Program provides an unprecedented opportunity for donors to invest in research projects that align exactly with their interests, from global health to education, and sustainability to social justice.  Funders set the parameters for each project, interact with the University of Michigan to identify faculty experts to lead their project, and receive compelling updates about the work of the team through the MCubed website.

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Media Grantmaking
MacArthur Foundation

Deadline: No fixed deadlines

MacArthur's goal in media grantmaking is to provide the public with high-quality, professionally-produced documentary films, deep and analytical journalism, and well-produced news and public affairs programming. In a media environment characterized by proliferating information sources of varying degrees of reliability, the Foundation seeks to support serious, fact-based journalism for television, radio and the web, the type of original reporting that is likely to be blogged about, linked to, tweeted, and otherwise circulated throughout the Internet. Programs supported by the Foundation inform and educate their viewers about important and under-reported topics, provide balance and accurate information, encourage global conversations, and use technology to tell stories in engaging and interactive ways.

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Michelson Grants in Reproductive Biology
Found Animals Foundation

Deadline: Letters of intent are accepted and reviewed on an ongoing basis and, if approved, researchers are invited to submit grant proposals for a March, July, or November deadline

Funding for promising proposals in pursuit of non-surgical sterilization products or technologies for use in dogs and cats. The foundation encourages scientists from any and all fields to compete for the Michelson Grants, including but not limited to researchers in disciplines such as biology, biotechnology,cell biology, endocrinology, gene silencing, immunology, materials science, nanotechnology, neuroscience, pharmacology, reproductive biology, theriogenology, and more.

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Michelson Prize in Reproductive Biology

Deadline: none specific

The $25 million Michelson Prize will be offered to the first entity to provide Found Animals Foundation with a single dose, safe and effective non-surgical sterilant for male and female cats and dogs.

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Pioneering Ideas Unsolicited Proposals
Johnson (Robert Wood) Foundation

Deadline: There are no specific submission deadlines for unsolicited proposals

The Pioneer Portfolio is uniquely suited to invest in innovation at many different stages. The sponsor seeks to: Identify and explore new issues and approaches; Accelerate progress on issues and approaches that have significant potential to create breakthroughs in health and health care; and Support projects that use original, unconventional, or cross-sectoral approaches to create transformative change.

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Priority Grantmaking Program
United States Institute of Peace

Deadline is on a rolling basis

The Grant Initiative will focus on the following regions:

Afghanistan--Grantmaking in Afghanistan will support projects designed to promote public understanding of peaceful alternatives to the violent resolution of conflict, the rule of law, transitional justice, and to improve local capacities for dialogue and peacebuilding.

Pakistan--Grantmaking in Pakistan will strengthen civil society capacities for conflict prevention and promote greater understanding of issues related to identity, tolerance, diversity, and sectarian extremism in Pakistan through education, training, research, and the media.

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Promoting International Arts Engagement
Clark (Robert Sterling) Foundation

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

The Foundation's aim is to strengthen cultural organizations of the highest artistic quality by enabling them to participate in the global marketplace. The Foundation hopes that the Promoting International Arts Engagement program will help leverage new support in this area and introduce American culture to communities around the world, as well as bring diverse world cultures to American audiences.

While the Foundation considers support for projects that bring international artists to the U.S., preference is given to projects that send American arts abroad. While there are no restrictions on countries or regions, the Foundation is more inclined to support activities that involve underserved or underrepresented parts of the world. Favor is given to projects having lasting impact and value, including international tours that lead to new engagements, programs that broaden audiences and attract new sources of income, documentation of work that is disseminated widely, and arts engagement activities that benefit the community.

The objectives of Promoting International Arts Engagement are to: strengthen performing and visual arts organizations by helping to make possible international touring and collaborations that offer broad audience outreach and build lasting partnerships; provide presenting organizations with the opportunity to showcase important international artists from underrepresented regions, and introduce audiences to new artistic perspectives from world cultures; assist organizations that organize significant exchanges or forums bringing together U.S. artists and their international counterparts to inform the creative process; and sustain arts service organizations that advance global arts engagement, through new Internet technologies, program documentation and dissemination, translations, and technical assistance for artists, among other activities. 

Other Information: The Foundation receives and reviews proposals year-round.  The Board of Directors meets four times per year: January, April, July, and October to review submissions. 

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Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Proposal Deadline: Open

Changes in Health Care Financing and Organization (HCFO) supports investigator-initiated research, policy analysis and evaluation projects that provide policy leaders timely information on health care policy, financing and organization issues. Supported projects include: examining significant issues and interventions related to health care financing and organization and their effects on health care costs, quality and access; and exploring or testing major new ways to finance and organize health care that have the potential to improve access to more affordable and higher quality health services.

This call for proposals is intended to stimulate projects that: examine significant issues and interventions related to health care financing and organization and their effects on health care costs, quality and access; and explore or test major new ways to finance and organize health care that have the potential to improve access to more affordable and higher quality health services.

Grants will be awarded in two categories: Small grants for projects requiring $100,000 or less and projected to take up to 12 months or less; and Large grants for projects requiring more than $100,000 and/or projected to take longer than 12 months. 

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Saudi American Educational and Cultural Initiative Grant
Department of State

June 30, 2015

SYNOPSIS: 

Saudi-American Educational and Cultural Initiative Grants support innovative forms of collaboration between Saudi and U.S. non-governmental and community organizations, universities, entrepreneurs, cultural organizations and qualified individuals to expand the diversity of activities in the U.S.-Saudi partnership and develop the next generation of leaders, especially among youth, young professionals and women, to promote mutual understanding and respect through long-term partnership and cooperation between our two countries. The Public Affairs Section of the U.S. Embassy to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is now accepting proposals from Saudi and U.S. non-governmental and community organizations, universities, entrepreneurs, cultural organizations or qualified individuals who propose to work together to develop or expand educational, professional and cultural exchange activities and promote dialogue and partnership between the people of the United States and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The Embassy is especially interested in identifying and supporting U.S-Saudi partnerships that include a focus on the development of exchanges, projects and partnerships between U.S. and Saudi youth or women; or that involve the development of professional linkages in business, healthcare or media, including social media; or that build on Saudi efforts to modernize and build a knowledge-based economy; or that expand Saudi-U.S. educational partnerships; or that are submitted by or involve alumni of exchange programs sponsored by the U.S. or Saudi governments. Projects may include, but are not limited to:

& Academic and professional lectures, seminars and speaker programs;

& Artistic and cultural workshops, joint performances and exhibitions;

& Cultural heritage conservation and preservation projects;

& Cultural, professional and academic exchanges and projects;

& Professional development workshops and training.

Requests for funding provided by the U.S. Embassy should be at least $3000 and not more than $25,000; the most competitive proposals will include significant funding from other sources as cost-share in the project budget. Proposals are accepted on a rolling basis from qualified U.S. or Saudi individuals and organizations. Proposals must include a letter of support from the proposed U.S. or Saudi partner, whether a qualified individual or organization. The proposal or letter of support from the Saudi partner must confirm the ability and willingness of the Saudi partner to sponsor the visa(s) for the U.S. partner, if necessary, and to assume responsibility for all travel and logistics within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The U.S. Embassy in Saudi Arabia is not able to assist with visas or travel arrangements funded through the grant. Proposals will be evaluated for funding by an Embassy committee on a monthly basis. The committee will identify projects with outstanding educational, artistic, or cultural merits for funding. In deciding which projects to support, the committee will give consideration to the full range and diversity of American and Saudi educational and cultural traditions and seek to target geographically and demographically diverse audiences. Projects that involve direct, in-depth professional interaction, with the potential for sustained collaboration and that show evidence of professional accomplishment and innovation will receive priority. The proposals will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

& The proposal demonstrates that the Saudi and U.S. individuals and/or organizations have sufficient expertise, skills and capacity to implement the project.

& The project will make a substantive contribution to the expanding types of partnerships between Saudi and U.S. individuals, organizations and institutions.

& The individuals and/or organizations demonstrate that they have a clear understanding of the topic or issue that the project is aiming to address.

& The individuals and/or organizations have identified appropriate beneficiaries or target groups to maximize project outputs and outcomes and the project has a clear focus and manageable scope.

& The project idea and approach is innovative yet proposed project activities are concrete and detailed and supported by a work plan.

& The project budget is well-organized, detailed and reasonable. There are no budget lines labeled "miscellaneous expenses." The budget demonstrates that the individual or organization has devoted time to plan for and assess actual expenses associated with the project instead of providing rough estimates. No grant funds are proposed for the purchase of food, drink, or entertainment.

& The proposal clearly articulates how the partners will assess and measure performance throughout the project implementation phase using quantitative and qualitative assessment tools.

& The proposal describes clearly the approach that will be used to ensure the sustainability of the project or partnership. The following types of projects are not eligible for funding:

& Requests by organizations and individuals who are neither Saudi nor American;

& those relating to partisan political activity;

& humanitarian or charitable activities;

& conferences and individual trips abroad;

& trade activities;

& fund-raising campaigns;

& commercial projects;

& scientific research;

& projects aiming only at primary institutional development of the organization; or

& projects that duplicate existing projects.

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Simons Foundation for Autism Research Initiative (SFARI)

Deadline: Accepted on a rolling basis

Explorer Awards are intended to provide resources to support exploratory experiments that will strengthen hypotheses and lead to the formulation of competitive applications for subsequent larger-scale funding by SFARI or other organizations. Innovative, high-risk/high-impact proposals are encouraged. We especially encourage applications from investigators who are new to the field of autism, but who have expertise that could be brought to bear on this complex disorder.

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Statistical Consulting Services - Assistance with study design and statistical analysis
MSU

Available Fall 2014

In Fall 2014 formal statistical consulting services will be available to all researchers on campus.  This includes assistance in study design, statistical analysis, and interpretation of results.  The inaugural statistical consultant will serve as the director of statistical consulting services on campus and help guide the future direction and growth of the service.  This position is funded for the first five years through an NIH-INBRE grant.

We encourage researchers to think about the future availability of this service as they are preparing research proposals.  Many funding agencies highly value demonstrated collaboration with statistical consultants in research design, data analysis, and dissemination of results.   The success of the service will depend on demonstrated need and use of its resources.  Therefore, we encourage researchers who anticipate using the service to assist in their research to consider including a budget item for MSU Statistical Consulting Services in their proposals.  A great place to start is with proposals submitted under the recent call from the VPR due May 9.  If you have questions about what to include please contact Megan Higgs (higgs@math.montana.edu) or any other Statistics faculty member (http://www.math.montana.edu/faculty/index.html#statistics).

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Sustainable Development Program
Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Inc.

Ongoing

SYNOPSIS: 

The Sustainable Development program advances global stewardship that is ecologically based, economically sound, socially just, culturally appropriate, and consistent with intergenerational equity. Human activity is causing global warming, rapid loss of biodiversity, and accelerating degradation of Earth's life support systems. With the recognition that the impact of unchecked climate change threatens all other conservation efforts, the program focuses its grantmaking on advancing solutions to climate change.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: 

Human activity is causing climate change, rapid loss of biodiversity, and accelerating degradation of Earth's life support systems. These developments threaten the livelihoods, health, and security of people in all nations and cultures as well as the well-being of the greater community of life. The RBF's sustainable development grantmaking endeavors to address these challenges by supporting development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The program supports global stewardship that is ecologically based, economically sound, socially just, culturally appropriate, and consistent with intergenerational equity. The Fund encourages government, business, and civil society to work collaboratively on climate change, to acknowledge the moral and ethical consequences of inaction, and to make it an integral part of all development planning and activity. Recognizing the global nature of many environmental problems, the Fund also promotes international cooperation in addressing these challenges.

The Sustainable Development program maintains a significant focus on the United States in light of its disproportionate impact on the global economy, politics, and the environment. The program's work is also advanced in collaboration with the Fund's "pivotal place" programs--New York City, Southern China, and the Western Balkans--and with the Democratic Practice program's Global Governance portfolio. Pivotal place programs support work in specific countries or regions to build the knowledge, policies, organizational capacity, and leadership needed to advance sustainable development in locally appropriate ways. The Fund's Global Governance portfolio supports broad participation in forging the international agreements and institutional arrangements needed to encourage investment in sustainable development. Fund staff work to ensure that global developments inform work in specific places and that locally grounded efforts generate lessons and innovations needed for global impact.

With the recognition that the impact of unchecked climate change threatens all other conservation efforts, the Sustainable Development program focuses its U.S. grantmaking on building a green economy at the federal, state, and local levels.

Grant Inquiries are accepted throughout the year.

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Toyota Motor North America, Inc. (TMA)

Deadline: Applications are accepted on a rolling basis

Nationally, Toyota focuses in three areas: environment, safety and education. National programs in these areas must have a broad reach by impacting several major U.S. cities, communities or groups.

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Improving Methods for Conducting Patient-Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR)
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

Town Hall (Applicant Training): Oct. 17, 2018
Agency LOI due: Nov. 6, 2018
Full Application due (by invitation only): Feb. 12, 2019

In this Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) Funding Announcement (PFA) for Improving Methods for Conducting Patient-Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR), also referred to as the \"Methods PFA,\" PCORI aims to fund studies that address high-priority methodological gaps in PCOR and comparative effectiveness research (CER).

The availability of multiple options for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment in health care presents a significant challenge to patients and clinicians trying to make informed care decisions. Deciding between alternative options in health care requires an understanding of how to balance the benefits and risks of each treatment option and an understanding of how each option might apply differently to different patients, given their unique personal characteristics. However, limitations in the design, implementation, and analysis of clinical research may produce biased study results that can have serious consequences for patients.

The PCORI Methodology Standards address some of the challenges related to the planning, conduct, and reporting of PCOR/CER, but these standards are not exhaustive. PCORI and its Methodology Committee recognize the need to better understand and advance the appropriate use of these methods for PCOR/CER. PCORI seeks to fund projects that address important methodological gaps and lead to improvements in the strength and quality of evidence generated by PCOR/CER studies.

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Lewis and Clark Fund for Exploration and Field Research in Astrobiology
American Philosophical Society

Application due: Feb. 15, 2019

Astrobiology is the study of the origin, evolution, distribution, and future of life on Earth and in the universe. It encompasses research in, among others, the fields of astronomy, chemistry, evolutionary biology, field and population biology, geology, microbiology, molecular biology, oceanography, paleontology, and planetary science. Astrobiology includes investigations of the geologic and fossil record to understand the conditions of the early Earth when life arose. Its scope also includes research of contemporary locations on Earth that might be similar to early earth and to environments elsewhere in our Solar System (such as on Mars, Europa, and Titan), which may be, or have been in the past, suitable for life. Astrobiology is also about understanding the characteristics of life, which requires investigations into extreme natural environments on Earth and, eventually, elsewhere.

The Lewis and Clark Fund for Exploration and Field Research in Astrobiology is open to field studies in any area of interest to astrobiology. Applications will be reviewed by a committee that includes members of the NASA Astrobiology Institute, the APS, and the wider science community as needed. Recipients will be designated as Lewis and Clark Field Scholars in Astrobiology.

Grants will be available to graduate students and postdoctoral and junior scientists who wish to participate in field studies for their theses or for other purposes. Eligibility for applicants with doctorates is limited to those five years or fewer beyond their Ph.D. or equivalent degree, although, rarely, exceptions may be made. A graduate student applicant should ask his or her academic supervisor or field trip leader to write one of the two letters of recommendation, specifying the role of the student in the field trip and the educational contribution of the trip.

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Wildlife Acoustics Scientific Product Grant
Wildlife Acoustics, Inc.

Application due: Feb. 15, 2019

Wildlife Acoustics' mission is to support efforts in conservation and environmental stewardship. We want to enable those involved in animal biology, research and conservation to do their best work easily and quickly. To that end, Wildlife Acoustics has established a grant program to support bioacoustics research efforts from chiropteran, avian, terrestrial, amphibious and marine wildlife, to everything else in between.

Every quarter, Wildlife Acoustics will be giving away up to $5,000 of product to grant recipients worldwide. If they choose to make the results public, recipients will also have their work featured on our website and social media channels.

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Watershed Approach to Mitigating Hydrologic Impacts of Transportation Projects
Transportation Research Board

Application due: Feb. 27, 2019

State departments of transportation (DOTs) are facing increasingly stringent requirements for treating not only the quality but also the quantity of stormwater runoff. State DOTs are required to address project-related hydrologic volume impacts under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and the Clean Water Act, and in some cases, state and local regulations.

Research is needed to develop a fuller array of effective strategies and techniques for managing increased stormwater runoff volumes and mitigating hydrologic impacts associated with transportation projects. As regulatory requirements increasingly address stormwater runoff quantity, state DOTs need information on a range of techniques that can support effective watershed-based strategies. The research and resulting guidance will support the efforts of engineers, environmental staff, and planners at state DOTs and their regulatory and other partners with flexible approaches to regulatory compliance and improved environmental outcomes.

The objective of this research is to develop guidance for state DOTs for developing and implementing watershed-based strategies and techniques for mitigating hydrologic impacts of transportation facilities. The results of the research will be guidance on how to:

  • Identify opportunities in a watershed to conserve, restore, enhance, or create landscape features for hydrologic mitigation;
  • Plan, site, and design features for hydrologic mitigation;
  • Quantify the hydrologic outcomes from selected features; and
  • Develop strategies for implementing a watershed-based approach to hydrologic mitigation.

The National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) is seeking the insights of proposers on how best to achieve the research objective. Proposers are expected to describe research plans that can realistically be accomplished within the constraints of available funds and contract time. Proposals must present the proposers' current thinking in enough detail to demonstrate their understanding of the issues and the soundness of their approach to meeting the research objective. The work proposed must be divided into tasks and phases, with appropriate checkpoints with the NCHRP project panel including panel review and/or NCHRP approval of interim deliverables.

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Lloyd J. Old STAR Program
Cancer Research Institute

Application due: Mar. 1, 2019

The Cancer Research Institute (CRI) is embarking on a new initiative that supports world-class academic investigators who have made notable contributions to immunotherapy and have the greatest potential to propel the field forward. CRI's newest program, the CRI Lloyd J. Old STAR Program--Scientists Taking Risks--will provide long-term funding to mid-career scientists providing them the freedom and flexibility to pursue high-risk, high-reward research at the forefront of discovery and innovation.

Rooted in CRI's exceptional track record of identifying and supporting people who have had a major impact on the cancer immunology enterprise, these new grants will not be tied to a specific research project, but rather would support outstanding researchers based on the quality and promise of their overall work. The Lloyd J. Old STAR program will provide up to $1.25 million over a five-year period to support mid-career scientists: tenure-track assistant professors (minimum three years) and associate professors (maximum three years). Named for CRI's founding scientific and medical director, whose vision and expertise guided CRI's programs for 40 years earning him the title Father of Modern Tumor Immunology, the CRI Lloyd J. Old STAR Program supports today's scientific visionaries.

Candidates selected for this award are expected to be the future leaders in the field of cancer immunotherapy, and this sustained funding will enable them to carry out transformational research. Because the funds are not restricted to a specific project, the award allows the recipients to follow new and promising lines of investigation, which often lead to unanticipated scientific breakthroughs. This long-term funding provides a degree of flexibility and freedom to explore out-of-the-box and disruptive avenues of research.

The profile of a recipient investigator would be a scientist who takes risks with the expectation of high rewards, even in the face of potential failure. They will use their expertise, scientific acumen, and visionary curiosity to ask important, significant, and often non-obvious immunological questions. They will be the rare researcher who connects disparate pieces of discoveries, often from multiple disciplines, to develop and test new hypotheses that lead to step changes in our understanding and innovation to the field of cancer immunotherapy.

It is expected that their discoveries in basic or translational research will ultimately influence the development of new immune-based therapies that will be effective for more cancer patients. CRI Lloyd J. Old STARs will be at the forefront of discovery and innovation and will be viewed as the leaders in scientific thought and invention.

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Technology Impact Award
Cancer Research Institute

Agency LOI due: Nov. 15, 2018
Full Application due (by invitation only): Mar. 15, 2019

The Cancer Research Institute Technology Impact Award provides seed funding of up to $200,000 to be used over 12 to 24 months to address the gap between technology development and clinical application of cancer immunotherapies. These grants aim to encourage collaboration between technology developers and clinical cancer immunologists and to generate the proof-of-principle of a novel platform technology in bioinformatics, ex vivo or in silico modeling systems, immunological or tumor profiling instrumentation, methods, reagents and assays, or other relevant technologies that can enable clinician scientists to generate deeper insights into the mechanisms of action of effective or ineffective cancer immunotherapies.

Award winners will be selected based on the novelty, creativity, technical sophistication, and transformative potential of the technology to impact cancer immunotherapy research around the world. The aim of this program is to advance technologies that can accelerate the entire field's efforts in addressing one of the most defining challenges of our time: developing immunotherapies that are effective for all cancer patients.

The most competitive applicants will address areas where technological innovation stands to benefit the field and cancer patients most, and that will ultimately lead to effective next generation personalized cancer immunotherapies. These technologies may include but are not limited to:

  • New bioinformatics methods or technologies that speed collection and analysis of large sets of patient-derived biological data
  • Computer simulations for modeling biological systems and responses to immunotherapy
  • Tools and methods that improve profiling of tumors to inform therapeutic strategies
  • Real-time visualizations of molecular and cellular activity to improve tracking of responses to immunotherapy
  • In vitro tissue culture systems that recapitulate the interactions between primary tumor cells and the immune system

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Aquatic Invasive Species Grants
Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC)

Application due: Mar. 28, 2019

The Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) Reclamation and Development Grants Program (RDGP) is offering grants to local governments for projects that address the prevention, management, and control of aquatic invasive species (AIS). The goal of the grants is to protect the natural resources of Montana from severe and unacceptable damage from AIS. Funding will be available as appropriated by the state legislature each biennium.

The proposed project must be critical and urgent and contribute to the protection of the aquatic environment of Montana from severe and unacceptable damage to natural resources from AIS. Public benefit from implementation of the project must directly relate to the prevention, early detection, rapid response, or control of AIS. Activities include, but are not limited to, aquatic invasive species: (1) outreach and education; (2) prevention; (3) surveying and monitoring; (4) control; (5) treatment demonstration, research or design; or (6) other related actions.

The project must align with state AIS priorities, must show local support, and must be coordinated with related AIS efforts in the area and at a statewide level. The project must commit to using statewide AIS protocols and reporting methods. While a letter of support from the state is not necessary, a letter of coordination is recommended.

Preference will be given to: AIS species on the Montana Noxious Weed List and AIS under the authority of Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (FWP); and to locally-led on-the-ground projects that result in measurable prevention and control of AIS. On-the-ground control projects are eligible for funding but require a management plan that includes: description of the problem, impacts to natural resources, alternatives analysis, and management actions supported by scientific research, funding strategy, monitoring plan, and metrics to meet management goals, stakeholder collaboration, and local support for project.

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Faculty / Post-Doctoral Research Grant Program (behavioral or psychological research studies)
Fahs-Beck Fund for Research and Experimentation

Application due: Apr. 1, 2019

The Fahs-Beck Fund for Research and Experimentation is accepting applications for behavioral or psychological research studies. The Fund will award grants of up to $20,000 to help support the research of faculty members or post-doctoral researchers affiliated with non-profit human service organizations in the United States.

Areas of interest to the Fund are studies to develop, refine, evaluate, or disseminate innovative interventions designed to prevent or ameliorate major social, psychological, behavioral or public health problems affecting children, adults, couples, families, or communities; or studies that have the potential for adding significantly to knowledge about such problems.

The principal investigator (PI) must have an earned doctorate in a relevant discipline and relevant experience. The PI must be in full control of the research and be the principal author of the final report.

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Treatment of Anxiety Disorders in Children, Adolescents, and/or Young Adults
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

Agency LOI due: Jan. 31, 2019
Full Application due (by invitation only): Apr. 24, 2019

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) has had an ongoing interest in funding high-quality clinical studies that compare the effectiveness of evidence-based clinical strategies to treat anxiety disorders in children, adolescents, and/or young adults. Clinical strategies to be studied may include pharmacological interventions, psychological interventions, or a combination of both. Each proposed comparator must be clearly defined, evidence-based, widely available, and appropriate for the age range and clinical severity of the study population.

The proposed study population should include patients with a confirmed clinical diagnosis of a primary anxiety disorder and who are between seven and 25 years of age. Applicants must clearly define the specific age range to be studied and provide a scientific rationale for the proposed study population and interventions.

Applicants should consider several factors when defining their study population, including but not limited to: anxiety severity, type(s) of anxiety disorder(s), exposure to previous treatment(s)/treatment failure, recurrent or relapsed illness, patient co-morbidities and/or subpopulations. Studies should be conducted in well-defined, primary, specialty and/or integrated clinical care settings. If psychological services constitute all or part of the delivered intervention(s), they must be well defined and characterized.

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Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Adults
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

Agency LOI due: Jan. 31, 2019
Application due (by invitation only): Apr. 24, 2019

Through this funding initiative, PCORI seeks to support patient-centered comparative clinical effectiveness research to generate important findings about which specific treatments for adults with PTSD are most effective, and for whom.

For this PCORI funding announcement, the proposed comparators may include psychological interventions, pharmacological interventions, or a combination of the two. All proposed comparators must have demonstrated evidence of efficacy (from systematic reviews, prior empirical investigations, or other scientific documentation). Study endpoints should include patient-centered outcomes such as symptom frequency and severity, functional endpoints, and quality of life.

Studies must include a minimum of six months of follow-up. PCORI is especially interested in studies that are inclusive of a broad patient population, including those with co-morbidities, and in studies that are powered to assess the effectiveness of treatments in subgroups of interest.

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Treatment Options for Age-Related Hearing Loss
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

Agency LOI due: Jan. 31, 2019
Full Application due (by invitation only): Apr. 24, 2019

This PCORI funding announcement (PFA) seeks to fund rigorous, impactful comparative effectiveness research (CER) projects that focus on treatment options for adults 50 years or older with mild to moderate age-related hearing loss.

For this PFA, investigators should address important decisional dilemmas by comparing treatment options that may include hearing devices and/or the support services for hearing loss. Hearing devices may encompass, but are not limited to, hearing aids or personal sound amplification products. Examples of support services include audiologist or licensed technician fitting of hearing aids, patient self-selection and -fitting of hearing aids, and counseling or education interventions. Proposed comparators must have documented evidence of efficacy for hearing-related outcomes or of widespread use.

Studies should evaluate important patient-centered outcomes for up to six months, although studies with well justified design and analysis plans that may be completed in a shorter time frame are encouraged.

Please note that PCORI does not fund intervention costs and investigators will be required to document how they plan to cover these costs.

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Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program
U.S. Geological Survey / Montana Water Center

Pre-Proposal due: Feb. 15, 2019
Full Proposal due (by invitation only): May 31, 2019

The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the National Institutes for Water Resources requests proposals for matching grants to support research on the topic of improving and enhancing the nation's water supply, including evaluation of innovative approaches to water treatment, infrastructure design, retrofitting, maintenance, management, and replacement; exploration and advancement of our understanding of changes in the quantity and quality of water resources in response to a changing climate, population shifts, and land use changes; development of methods for better estimation of water supply, both surface and groundwater, including estimation of the physical supply and of the economic supply of water; development and evaluation of processes and governance mechanisms for integrated surface/ground water management; and the evaluation and assessment of conservation practices.

Any investigator at an accredited institution of higher learning in the United States is eligible to apply for a grant through a Water Research Institute or Center. Proposals involving substantial collaboration between the USGS and university scientists are encouraged. Proposals may be for projects of from one to three years in duration and may request up to $250,000 in federal funds. Successful applicants must match each dollar of the federal grant with one dollar from non-federal sources.

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Pew Biomedical Programs: Informational Webinar
Pew Biomedical Programs

Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019, 12:00 p.m. MST

The Pew Scholars Program and Pew-Stewart Scholars for Cancer Research are national funding initiatives designed to support assistant professors of outstanding promise in science relevant to the advancement of human health. Each award provides $300,000 in flexible support--$75,000 per year for a four-year period.

This year, Pew Biomedical Programs staff will host an informational webinar for institutional nomination committees and potential applicants from the list of participating institutions for each program so that they may learn more about both programs in advance of our summer 2019 call for nominations. We highly encourage you to register for this event, even if your institution has nominated a candidate in the past.

Topics covered will include:

  • Overview of the Pew Charitable Trusts Mission and Current Work

  • Biomedical Funding Opportunities

  • Program Eligibility Criteria for both the Pew Scholars and Pew-Stewart Programs

  • Similarities and differences between the Scholars and Pew-Stewart programs

  • Keys to Selecting a Competitive Candidate

  • Application Process Overview and Timeline

There will also be a Q&A session for clarification of any additional questions.

For complete program information visit:

Pew Scholars Program Site (https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/projects/pew-biomedical-scholars)

Pew-Stewart Scholars for Cancer Research Site (

https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/projects/pew-stewart-scholars-for-cancer-research)

The webinar will take place on Tuesday, January 15, 2019 at 12:00 p.m. MST. To join the program, please complete the registration form using the program link below.

Questions should be directed to scholarsapp@pewtrusts.org.

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